Tag Archives: Sue Polanka

April episode of AL Live tackles the present and future of ebooks

Mark your calendars. April 18th episode of American Libraries Live will focus on the present and future of ebooks and what their continued popularity means for libraries and librarians everywhere. The interactive (and free) discussion will be moderated by No Shelf Required blogger and ebook expert Sue Polanka and will include contributions from:

• Jamie LaRue, Director of the Douglas County (CO) Libraries and an innovator in making e-books available to patrons.

• Scott Wasinger, Vice President of Sales for eBooks and Audiobooks at EBSCO Publishing, who has been involved with eContent since the early days of commercial e-readers.

The episode will take place on April 18th between 2 and 3 p.m. (Eastern). More information is available here: http://americanlibrarieslive.org/blog/month-al-live-present-and-future-e-books. If you’re unable to attend live, this event will be recorded and available at www.americanlibrarieslive.org shortly after it concludes.

AL Live is the free streaming video broadcast from American Libraries, covering library issues and trends in real time as you interact with hosts via a live chat and get immediate answers to your questions.

 

ALA Editions announces eContent Quarterly, a new online journal co-edited by Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic

November 21, 2012 – CHICAGO—ALA Editions announces eContent Quarterly, a new online journal. Launching in Fall 2013, eContent Quarterly will offer practical, user-driven solutions and ideas for curating, developing, integrating and managing content in rapidly-changing digital library environments.

The journal is edited by Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic, whose deep knowledge of the e-content landscape and vast library and editorial experience combine to bring clarity and focus to the journal’s purpose: helping information professionals keep pace with e-book and journal platforms, databases, multi-media products, digital solutions and discovery services.  Written by and for information professionals in the business of producing, selling and buying e-content—including librarians and publishers—each issue will consist of in-depth articles that explore the many facets of electronic content, as well as supplements ranging from product reviews to interviews with key players. Look for subscription information for eContent Quarterly in 2013. Continue reading ALA Editions announces eContent Quarterly, a new online journal co-edited by Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic

University Presses and eBooks: A New Horizon

ONLINE magazine has a new column called Ebook Buzz.  The column, written by Sue Polanka, features a discussion of university presses and eBooks.  From the text:

“What’s the buzz about? EBook Buzz, ONLINE’s newest column, will discuss and debate the advances of ebooks in libraries and scholarly publishing. EBook Buzz will explore varied topics from a practical perspective, whether celebrating successes, exploring opportunities, or sorting through the challenges of ebook adoption. This inaugural column will explore the transformation to ebooks by university presses.

Academic library monograph budgets tell a bleak story. Discretionary funds and approval plans have slowly decreased, favoring instead subscription products and big deal journal collections. It’s both alarming for librarians to watch and impossible for publishers to ignore. University presses, owners of the academic monograph, are feeling increasingly unsettled in this changing budget landscape. They want to transition to a mixed-model—digital and print—system of content delivery, but they must first overcome a number of challenges.” Continue reading University Presses and eBooks: A New Horizon

Reference Apps – feature article in Booklist

The January 1, 2012 issue of Booklist features Sue Polanka’s Off The Shelf column on reference apps.  Titled, “Reference- I’ve got an App for That,” the article highlights iOS and Android apps from 7 reference publishers.  Here is an excerpt and list of reference publishers included:

Excerpt: “These days, it seems there’s an app for everything. So it should come as no surprise that several reference publishers are producing apps for Apple- and Android-based tablets and phones. Why should reference publishers develop apps? “Our focus is on helping libraries reach new users where they reside. We believe that one of the most effective ways to do this is through apps,” says Nader Qaimari, senior vice president of marketing for Cengage Learning. Mike Robinson, e-book sales and marketing manager at Oxford University Press, agrees, stating, “Apps represent a means by which people all over the world are using devices to help them. We provide authoritative content to meet people’s reference needs, and it’s important to us to do so in the most useful ways possible.” Gale/Cengage, OUP, and a host of other reference publishers have a variety of apps available.”

Publishers featured include:

  • DK
  • Elsevier
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica
  • Gale/Cengage Learning
  • Oxford University Press
  • Wiley
  • World Book

A Guide to Ebook Purchasing – American Libraries

Check out the latest article in American Libraries Magazine (Dispatches from the Field column) about eBook purchasing.  It is a condensed version of a larger piece that will appear in Library Technology Reports Nov/Dec issue, which should be available very soon. Topics include: print to digital, business models, publishers/aggregators/wholesalers, buying through consortia, and evaluating vendors.

Here is the first paragraph and citation info:
A Guide to Ebook Purchasing
By Sue Polanka
Tue, 11/15/2011 – 08:12
American Libraries Magazine

Advice from the author of No Shelf Required on how to flex your library’s purchasing muscle

For those libraries looking to purchase e-books, you are not alone. According to the Library Journal 2011 survey of ebook penetration and use in libraries, 95% of academic, 82% of public, and 44% of school libraries are already offering ebooks, and many more are considering it. For anyone contemplating purchasing ebooks, asking why is the most important question. What are the primary goals of purchasing ebooks in your library or your consortium? Is it to expand the collection or to increase the buying power of a group of libraries? Is it to replace existing print collections, offer new services, or experiment with new business models in the hope of saving money? Whatever the reason, it is imperative to keep one’s goals in mind throughout the process. Buying ebooks is a complicated process. To do it effectively is an even greater challenge due to the many ways to procure ebooks.

No Shelf Required’s two new publications

No Shelf Required has been busy this past year exploring the many topics of eBooks and libraries.  Very soon, two new publications will be available from ALA Publishing which share the No Shelf Required name.  These new publications contain completely new content, expanding upon No Shelf Required: E-books in Libraries, ALA Editions, 2011. Details are below.  For a complete list of NSR publications, please visit our publications page.

The first publication will be the No Shelf Required Guide to E-Book Purchasing.  This guide will appear in the November/December (v. 47 n. 8)  issue of Library Technology Reports (direct URL coming soon).  Chapters and contributors in this double issue include: Continue reading No Shelf Required’s two new publications

E-Discovering Reference

With the advent of the internet and growing popularity of Wikipedia, traditional library reference tools have experienced a decline in use.  As a result, many reference publishers began producing electronic books or converting traditional print multi-volume titles to online databases.  While this has been a valiant effort, much of the content still goes undiscovered due to limited access from subscription costs, firewalls, passwords, and lack of indexing in search engines.

A new book from IGI Publishing, the first in the Advances in Library and Information Science (ALIS) series, discusses the myriad issues with e-reference discovery in libraries.  The 23 chapters explore the topic in academic, public, and school libraries as well as from the publishers perspective.  The book is available in print or e formats.  E formats offer the ability to purchase individual chapters.  The first ALIS newsletter featured the preface and 8 selected chapters from the book. Continue reading E-Discovering Reference

Patron Driven Acquisition in Libraries

Patron Driven Acquisition has gained much interest from libraries these days. As a result, many are writing about their experiences with the new business model.

Today, Inside Higher Education featured an article on “PDA In the Library,” (E-book acquisition based on use and demand could save libraries thousands). This article discusses the benefits of PDA, highlighting a study from a D.C. consulting firm, The Advisory Board Company.  Examples of PDA in action from the Grand Valley State University in Michigan are included.  Grand Valley works with EBL for their PDA plan.  Many other aggregators and publishers also offer PDA plans including ebrary, eBooks on EBSCOhost, and Ingram/MyiLibrary.  OverDrive recently announced a PDA option for their new WIN platform, but I don’t believe it has launched yet. Continue reading Patron Driven Acquisition in Libraries

New Jersey eBook Summit Summary – part two

Please note that the part two blog post has now been added to the New Jersey eBook Summit Summary.

Today the NJ State Library, LinbraryLinkNJ- The NJ Library Cooperative, NJ Library Association and the NJLA Reference Section sponsored an E-book Summit in Eatontown, New Jersey.  The line-up of speakers included:

  • Eli Neiburger, Ann Arbor District Library
  • Sue Polanka, Wright State University Library & No Shelf Required
  • Robert Miller, Director of Books, Internet Archive
  • Mary Minow, Attorney, Consultant, and Former Librarian
  • Joseph Sanchez, University of Colorado – Denver Continue reading New Jersey eBook Summit Summary – part two

New Jersey Ebook Summit Summary

Pictured from left to right:  Eli Neiberger, Patricia Tumulty, Mary Minow, Norma Blake, Robert Miller, Sue Polanka, Cheryl O’Connor, Joseph Sanchez, Peggy Cadigan.

Today the NJ State Library, LinbraryLinkNJ- The NJ Library Cooperative, NJ Library Association and the NJLA Reference Section sponsored an E-book Summit in Eatontown, New Jersey.  The line-up of speakers included:

  • Eli Neiburger, Ann Arbor District Library
  • Sue Polanka, Wright State University Library & No Shelf Required
  • Robert Miller, Director of Books, Internet Archive
  • Mary Minow, Attorney, Consultant, and Former Librarian
  • Joseph Sanchez, University of Colorado – Denver Continue reading New Jersey Ebook Summit Summary

ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

ALA TechSource has just opened registration for the upcoming webinar series on e-books and e-readers.  I hope you can join us.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library
with Sue Polanka

Two 90-minute sessions
Thursdays 8/4/11 and 8/11/11
2:30 – 4:00 PM EDT | 1:30 – 3:00 PM CDT
12:30 – 2:00 PM MDT | 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM PDT

With the exploding popularity of e-books and e-reading devices, librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate them into their services and collections. Sue Polanka is back by popular demand to present this two-session ALA TechSource workshop on how to go about it. With her practical guidance you will learn how to begin purchasing and lending e-books for your library, and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use. Continue reading ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

e-Reference books, the challenge of new editions

The new issue of Booklist is out and contains an Off The Shelf column, “The Challenge of New Editions.”  In the article I discuss the realities of updating new editions of reference books in an online environment.  Continuously updated database, new editions, access to multiple editions, and weeding e-reference books are discussed.  Content for the article was obtained from a survey of reference publishers in March 2011.  Other Off The Shelf columns are available on the publications page.

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 3

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

Four No Shelf Required Contributors Named 2011 LJ Movers and Shakers

No Shelf Required II:  The Use and Management of E-Books is currently underway with ALA Editions.  The forthcoming book offers a look at digital only libraries, device lending programs, consortial purchasing, eBook access issues (digital divide, accessibility, archiving/preservation, and weeding/updating), digital textbooks, the use of ebook/ereader technology in the classroom, and much much more.  When complete, it will contain 26 chapters written by 28 contributors, representing school, public, and academic libraries, publishers, consultants, and faculty.

I am pleased to announce that four of the contributors were named 2011 Library Journal Movers and Shakers.  They are:

Bobbi Newman

Buffy J. Hamilton

Joseph Sanchez

Sue Polanka

Congrats to these and all of the 2011 Library Journal Movers and Shakers!

IGI Launches Advances in Library Information Science Newsletter

IGI Publishing launched the inaugural issue of the Advances in Library Information Science (ALIS) Newsletter today.  The newsletter provides a value-added tool that gives a pre-publication, no-strings-attached glimpse into the library and information science content.  The Editor-in-Chief for the IGI ALIS series is Mirela Roncevic, formerly with Library Journal.

In the first newsletter, the forthcoming title edited by Sue Polanka, E-Reference Context and Discoverability in Libraries: Issues and Concepts, is highlighted offering eight essays.  The full book, to be released in the fall of 2011, boasts over 20 unique chapters on the issues and concepts surrounding reference content, written by  thirty-one contributors representing academic, public, and school libraries, publishers, library school professors, and other information industry professionals.

More information about the ALIS newsletter .

Read the preface of the forthcoming E-Reference title.

ALA TechSource Workshop on eBooks and Libraries

ALA TechSource is sponsoring a two-part webinar/workshop on eBooks and Libraries.  The details are below.  If you’d like to read an interview with Sue Polanka, the workshop presenter, it’s available here.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library (ALA TechSource Workshop)

With the recent explosion in the popularity of e-reading devices, many librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate these devices into their services and collection. In this two-session ALA TechSource workshop, Sue Polanka will provide practical guidance on how to begin purchasing e-books for your library to lend electronically and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use.
Continue reading ALA TechSource Workshop on eBooks and Libraries

ALAMW – ALA Washington Office Program on eBooks

Saturday, January 8th, ALA’s Washington Office is presenting, Turning the Page on E-books, a moderated discussion on the challenges and opportunities for libraries and their patrons from 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. in the Convention Center, Room 02.  Panelists and speakers include:  Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive; Tom Peters, CEO of TAP Information Sources (huge contributor to the COSLA Report); Rich Weingarten, information technology and policy consultant, and Sue Polanka, moderator of No Shelf Required. Come and join the discussion.

Are you weeding eBooks from your collection?

I picked up this post about weeding eBooks from a colleague who monitors collib-l.  I asked the originator, Gary Daught, if I could post it here as well.  Please feel free to respond as Gary (and I) would love to hear your feedback.  If you prefer to email, Gary is at GFDaught@milligan.edu.

Greetings. We now have well over 70,000 e-books in our holdings—a figure quickly approaching 50% of our entire book collection. A majority of these titles were purchased through our consortium as NetLibrary or other vendor collections.

This summer we began an earnest and long-overdue weeding of our print collection. We weed not only to recover/reduce shelf space but also to remove items that are dated, out-of-scope, or lacking in other desired academic qualities. It’s a lot of work as you well know. This second reason to weed got me thinking about our e-books. We don’t have to worry about shelf space with e-books. However, I can imagine that there are titles among our e-books that should also be weeded. Yes, it’s simple enough to suppress an item record from the OPAC. But how are we going to work through +70,000 titles?! Continue reading Are you weeding eBooks from your collection?