Tag Archives: sony reader

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 3

No Way! Kindle owners CAN borrow books from public libraries

I never thought I’d see the day!  Great news Amazon and OverDrive. News release from Kindle here.

From a Publishers Weekly article:  Amazon announced this morning that Kindle owners will soon be able to borrow books from public libraries. Working with vendor OverDrive, which manages e-book lending for the vast majority of public libraries, the deal will make thousands of titles available via more than 11,000 of OverDrive’s public library partners. To date, Kindle has been noticeably absent from library lending, as OverDrive’s service worked only with ePub-enabled devices, including the Sony Reader, the Nook, iPads, and smartphones. Amazon officials said that with Kindle Library Lending, library-ebooks managed by OverDrive will now be available for all generations of Kindle devices and for use with free Kindle reading apps on most other devices, including Android, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone.

The service will launch later this year.

OverDrive releases the Media console app for BlackBerry

Public, school, and college libraries now provide direct EPUB eBook downloads on BlackBerry® mobile devices with the free OverDrive® Media Consoleâ„¢ app for BlackBerry. Users at more than 13,000 libraries worldwide can wirelessly download and enjoy EPUB eBooks, as well as MP3 audiobooks, on their BlackBerry devices. Libraries offer best-selling titles, such as “The Social Animal” by David Brooks and “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett, which can be borrowed and enjoyed using OverDrive’s app for BlackBerry. Popular business eBooks and audiobooks, as well as titles in virtually any subject, are also available from the library using the BlackBerry app.

The OverDrive app for BlackBerry is available from OverDrive’s website and the MobiHand Superstore. The app will also appear in BlackBerry App Worldâ„¢ in the coming weeks. To see if your library is a member of the OverDrive network, visit OverDrive Search. Continue reading OverDrive releases the Media console app for BlackBerry

OverDrive Media Console app for iPad – direct library eBook & audiobook downloads

From an OverDrive Press Release: Public, school, and college libraries now provide direct eBook downloads on the iPad® with the free OverDrive® Media Consoleâ„¢ app. The optimized app enables users at more than 13,000 libraries worldwide to wirelessly download and enjoy eBooks and digital audiobooks from a local library on the Apple® device. Popular and best-selling titles, including “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson, “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand, and “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins, are a few of the Most Downloaded Books from the Library (www.overdrive.com/mostdownloaded). These digital books and more in popular genres like romance, mystery, thriller, and virtually every subject can now be borrowed from libraries and enjoyed in an optimized iPad app.

The OverDrive Media Console app for iPad is available in the App Store (http://bit.ly/OverDriveApp). To see if your library is a member of the OverDrive network, visit http://search.overdrive.com. Continue reading OverDrive Media Console app for iPad – direct library eBook & audiobook downloads

Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Last summer, Library Journal and School Library Journal conducted an eBook survey for libraries.  The survey was designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences.  They included an academic, public, and school library version of the survey.  Hundreds of questions were asked and hundreds of libraries responded. The results of those surveys were published in November, 2010 in three separate reports.  The executive summaries of each are available on the Library Journal site (and linked below), and full reports are available for purchase.  There were 1,842 respondents, broken down to 364 academic, 781 public, and 697 school libraries.  I’ve captured some of the data to share with you, but the reports are full of additional information on budgets, marketing, barriers to adoption, patron preference, and much, much more.  A primer on ebook readers and formats is in the appendix of each full report. Thanks to Josh Hadro at Library Journal for sharing the reports with me and allowing me to publish some of the data here on No Shelf Required. Continue reading Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Why Amazon will never work with libraries

Very interesting blog post at ireaderreview.com on why Amazon will never work with libraries.  The blog is not an official Kindle site, and the writer is portraying his views from a big business perspective, so keep this in mind before you shoot through the roof with anger, librarians.  The comments are colorful as well, and worth a look.   Let’s say this IS true, and Amazon will never work with libraries.  Does this change your attitude toward loaning Kindles and buying content from Amazon to support the Kindles?  If nook, SONY, Kobo, and others are better suited for library content, would you rather buy, loan and promote these devices in your library? I would.

200% increase in eBook checkouts from OverDrive virtual libraries….and more stats

From an OverDrive press release:  Libraries and schools worldwide were at the forefront of the eBook boom in 2010, as patrons and students downloaded millions of digital books for iPhone®, Androidâ„¢, Sony® Reader, NOOKâ„¢, and personal computers. More than one million new users signed on to access free eBooks, audiobooks, and more from ‘Virtual Branch’ websites last year, resulting in a 200 percent increase in eBook checkouts and a 52 percent increase in audiobook checkouts over 2009. To find eBooks, audiobooks, music, and video titles from a library near you, visit http://search.overdrive.com.

Key statistics for library eBooks, audiobooks, and more from OverDrive-powered digital catalogs include: Continue reading 200% increase in eBook checkouts from OverDrive virtual libraries….and more stats

OverDrive apps for iPhone and Android enable direct library downloads

OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) has released apps for iPhone® and Androidâ„¢ that enable users to download library eBooks and audiobooks directly to their devices for the first time. The free apps include a “Get Books” feature that guides users to their local library’s digital catalog of best-selling and new release titles, allowing them to easily browse, check out, and download with just their device. More than 13,000 public libraries, schools, colleges, and universities now offer eBook and audiobook downloads via OverDrive, including institutions in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, and nine other countries. Continue reading OverDrive apps for iPhone and Android enable direct library downloads

Primary Research Group releases Library Use of eBooks 2011 Edition

For those of you interested in eBook statistics related to libraries, this looks like a good candidate.

Primary Research Group has published Library Use of eBooks 2011 Edition, ISBN # 157440-157-2.

The report presents 145 pages of data and commentary on a broad range of eBook issues, including: spending on eBooks in 2010 and anticipated spending for 2011; use levels of various kinds of eBooks; market penetration by various specific eBook publishers; extent of use of aggregators vs offering by specific publishers; purchasing of individual titles; use of various channels of distribution such as traditional book jobbers and leading retail/internet based booksellers; use of eBooks in course reserves and interlibrary loan; impact of eBooks on print book spending; use of eBooks in integrated search; price increases for eBooks; contract renewal rates for eBooks; use of special eBook platforms for smartphones and tablet computers; spending plans and current use of eBook reader such as Nook, Reader and Kindle; the role played by library consortia in eBooks; Continue reading Primary Research Group releases Library Use of eBooks 2011 Edition

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

Articles of Interest

I missed this last Friday, sorry for the long list.

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

UK Publishers Association sets out restrictions on ebook lending – stupid!

Specter of e-book piracy looms large on horizon

If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of Us | Digital Book World

How five e-readers stacked up – USA Today

In Digital Age, Students Still Cling to Paper Textbooks

The Thinking LMS (Learning Management System) – Inside Higher Ed

Kindles at high school bring praise, surprises – one month of use at Clearwater High School

6 things I would do today if I were a bookstore owner waiting for Google Editions

Honey, I Shrunk the E-Book: Amazon Slicing “Singles” for Kindle

Libertary: new book reading site

Amazon has 76% of e-book market, survey reports

Kindles, Sony & Nook e-Readers Allowing Libraries To Thrive In Information Age?

CUNY to launch Entourage Edge pilot program

As Textbooks Go Digital, Will Professors Build Their Own Books? – Technology

Self-Publishing Company, Infinity Publishing, to Distribute eBooks via SONY Reader Store

I’m posting this because the COSLA report and some of the speakers at the eBook Summit yesterday believe that libraries should become self-publishers in an effort to increase their viability in the community and bring the community to the 21st century world.  Infinity is a vibrant, self-publishing company.  Perhaps we can learn something or start collaborating with companies like Infinity Publishing.

Infinity Publishing, a pioneer in self-publishing, today announced that it has signed a distribution agreement with Sony to make Infinity eBooks available for purchase on Sony’s Reader Storeâ„¢.

Infinity’s eBooks will now be available for sale on Sony’s Reader Store, from which readers can download eBooks in open-standard formats that can be viewed on various eBook reading devices, including Sony’s Reader. Continue reading Self-Publishing Company, Infinity Publishing, to Distribute eBooks via SONY Reader Store

SONY’s Reader Library Program – But can they loan the devices?

Great news from SONY.  They just announced 30 libraries across the country who will participate with them in the SONY Reader Library Program.  It’s truly wonderful to see an eBook reader company reaching out to libraries to promote and encourage the use of the eBooks.  What is unclear, however, is whether the program encourages libraries to lend the SONY devices to patrons.  The press release states that devices will be provided for library staff use and patron demonstrations.    I hope they won’t stop short of the idea to lend devices to patrons.  Here is more information from the SONY Press Release: Continue reading SONY’s Reader Library Program – But can they loan the devices?

Public Libraries, Why aren’t you lending nook, Kobo, COOL-ER and SONY eReaders?

I’m really curious about this, and reading a blog post from the Librarian in Black, which summarized a library futures event has gotten me even more curious.

Most public libraries who are lending eBook readers (at least those in the news) are loaning Kindles.  Why aren’t they lending nook, Kobo, COOL-ER, and SONY readers?  Kindle readers are not compatible with any of the library eBook aggregator content and require that libraries purchase titles again, in the Kindle format.  But nook, Kobo, COOL-ER, and SONY readers ARE compatible with some OverDrive and NetLibrary titles because they are in Adobe Digital Editions or PDF formats.  Am I missing something here?  Isn’t is plausible that a public library with large OverDrive and NetLibrary collections could pre-load already purchased content onto a compatible device and lend the device and the title to the patron? The Kobo reader comes loaded with 100 free titles.  Many free eBooks can be loaded onto these devices as well (even the Kindle is open to some of these).

Is it the fine print? Is it the content?  Or is it lack of knowledge on devices?  Your input on this issue is much appreciated.

OverDrive will demo digital downloads at National Book Festival

From an OverDrive press release:

OverDrive’s Digital Bookmobile (www.digitalbookmobile.com) will demonstrate digital book downloads available from America’s public libraries at the 2010 National Book Festival (www.loc.gov/bookfest) on Saturday, September 25, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on the National Mall in Washington, DC. This high-tech 18-wheeler and mobile exhibit offers hands-on demonstrations of download services available 24/7 from more than 11,000 libraries worldwide.

Digital Bookmobile visitors will be able to browse a library’s download website; sample eBooks, digital audiobooks, music, and video on interactive PC and Mac® computer stations; learn how to download; and test compatible devices including the Sony® Reader, nookâ„¢, iPod®, Zune®, and Smartphonesall loaded with digital titles from the library. Continue reading OverDrive will demo digital downloads at National Book Festival

New Book About eBooks in Libraries – Release in August

I’m thrilled to inform you that No Shelf Required: E-books in Libraries will be released in late August.  This edited book, published by ALA Editions, discusses a variety of eBook topics for school, public, and academic libraries.  Since I have a bit of clout with the publisher, I’m able to release the TOC and introduction for your review and consideration.  It is below.  Of course, it will be available in a variety of eBook formats, and print too. Continue reading New Book About eBooks in Libraries – Release in August

Demographics of an Audiobook User

Overdrive conducted a study of public library users of audiobooks, surveying 5 of their busiest sites.  The results concluded that audiobook listeners were:

  • 74% of users are female, between the ages of 30-59.
  • Nearly 70% have a college and/or postgraduate degree.
  • 60% learned about the download service from the library’s website (if our past blog posts and training sessions weren’t enough to get you to promote on your website, hopefully this is!)
  • 87% listen to audiobooks on an MP3 player, 44% of which are iPod users.
  • 33% of users own an eBook reader (e.g., Sony Reader, Barnes & Noble nook)
    For those who don’t own an eBook reader, 90% stated that compatibility of eBooks from the library is an important factor.

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

OverDrive Audiobook App Now Available in Android Market

from an OverDrive Press Release:

OverDrive Audiobook App Now Available in Androidâ„¢ Market
Android app enables wireless audiobook downloads from libraries and booksellers

Cleveland, OH — February 11, 2010 — OverDrive (www.overdrive.com), the leading global distributor of audiobooks and eBooks to libraries and retailers, announced that its audiobook app for Androidâ„¢ is now out of beta and available as a full release. OverDrive’s audiobook app for Android enables users to wirelessly download MP3 audiobooks from more than 10,000 libraries and major online retailers, including Barnesandnoble.com, BooksOnBoard.com, and Borders.com. Major devices, including DROIDâ„¢ by Motorola®, DROID Erisâ„¢, and Nexus Oneâ„¢, can now be used to access OverDrive-supplied MP3 audiobooks on the go. To install OverDrive® Media Consoleâ„¢ for Android v1.0, visit the Android Market on your device or download directly from http://overdrive.com/software/omc. Continue reading OverDrive Audiobook App Now Available in Android Market

2010 Horizon Report – eBooks top technology

For the last 7 years the New Media consortium and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have collaborated on the Horizon Report.  The report identifies key trends in higher education, critical challenges, and selects 6 technologies to watch.  Ebooks have made the top 6 technologies, in the mid-term horizon, which means 2 – 3 years for widespread adoption.   The study indicates that 3 obstacles to ebook adoption in higher education are now falling away – availability of titles, capability of readers, and problematic publishing models.   According to the report, more publishers are releasing textbook content electronically, ebook readers now have the ability to display graphics, bookmark, annotate, and more, and business models are changing to allow the purchase of the e without the p (and e is simultaneously being released with p).

The report sites several examples of ebooks in practice including the Penn State SONY project, Darden’s KINDLE project, DeepDyve, and Sophie.

NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition

Very cool news from OCLC/NetLibrary.  Their e-books are now compatible with the Nook as well as the new SONY Daily Edition (they were already compatible with the 4 versions of SONY Readers).  This is a real benefit for libraries who are looking for more e-reader options.  It opens up so many potentials for patron downloads and the use of e-readers by libraries (for circulation).  I hope to see other aggregators and publishers following suit and (fingers crossed) adding more textbooks to the mix.  The press release from OCLC is below.

NetLibrary eBooks compatible with new Barnes & Noble nook, new ony Daily Edition and other popular eBook readers

140,000 eBook titles available for download to portable devices
Continue reading NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition