Tag Archives: School Library Journal

94% of public libraries offer ebooks says the 2015 LJ/SLJ report

Library Journal/School Library Journal conducted the 6th annual survey of public libraries regarding ebooks.  The 2015 report is available for download here.  The report is made available courtesy of Freading.  Registration is required.

From the executive summary:  ” If  it  appears  from  the  current  survey  (based  on  317  U.S.  public  libraries  responding)  that  much  of  the  enthusiasm  for  ebooks  has  cooled,  it  is  only  because  they  have  become  less  of  a  novelty  and  more  mainstream.”

“Ebook pricing is too high” is the most common complaint from public librarians about ebooks.

Here’s a page snip showing the number of public libraries offering ebooks over the last 6 reports:

The number of Public Libraries offering ebooks from the 6 LJ/SLJ surveys from 2010 - 2015.
The number of Public Libraries offering ebooks from the 6 LJ/SLJ surveys from 2010 – 2015.

Free webinar: How to Keep K-8 Libraries Relevant for Teachers, Students, Nov. 4th

Register for this free webinar co-sponsored by Rourke Educational Media and School Library Journal.

VERO BEACH, Fla. (Oct. 20, 2014) –An expert panel of educators will analyze how using technology, understanding informational text, and improving literacy are keys to keeping K-8 school libraries relevant for teachers and students as part of a webcast set for Tuesday, Nov. 4.

“Keeping K-8 Libraries Relevant” – co-sponsored by Rourke Educational Media and School Library Journal– is scheduled from 3 to 4 p.m. EDT. The webcast panelists will examine how to:

Continue reading Free webinar: How to Keep K-8 Libraries Relevant for Teachers, Students, Nov. 4th

Free, fabulous, library event – TDS14: Libraries@the Center

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Library Journal and School Library Journal’s 5th annual online conference: The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center is scheduled for October 1, 2014.  More information is available online at http://www.thedigitalshift.com/tds/libraries-at-the-center/

The event is free for attendees and will provide answers to some of the biggest challenges libraries face in the transformation of our culture from analog experiences to digital experiences. This daylong professional development conference can be viewed in groups or privately. There are no travel or registration fees, and attendees will connect with each other as well as hear exciting keynotes from award-winning scientist and author Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, and Anil Dash, cofounder and CEO of ThinkUp, that will examine our shared digital future. Continue reading Free, fabulous, library event – TDS14: Libraries@the Center

School library eBook market must reads

School Library Journal has published two recent articles about the eBook market in schools.  The first is the “School Ebook Market Directory.”  This piece features a snapshot of 19 eBook vendors for school libraries.  Some of these include ABC-CLIO, Capstone, Rosen, OverDrive, Gale, StarWalk Kids, and Tumblebooks.   The second article is “E. It’s Complicated.  How Two Schools are Riding the Transition to Ebooks.”  SLJ talked to academic experts and visited librarians, teachers, and students at two high-performing Illinois high schools: New Trier Township High School in Winnetka and Northfield, and Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire.  The article is in a Q/A format and discusses topics such as why go digital, will ebooks help kids learn more, who owns and pays for devices, what are the hurdles to adoption, and many more.  Both are worth a read.

The LJ/SLJ Digital Shift event is this Wednesday, are you registered?

I hope you will join me in attending this virtual conference on Wednesday.  There is a great line-up of speakers, panelists, and other events.  More info below from LJ/SLJ

WHAT: The Digital Shift: Libraries, eBooks and Beyond, the  3rd annual online summit by Library Journal/School Library Journal,  will explore how libraries are navigating the transition from print to digital and integrating “e” into collections, catalogs and classrooms.

This full-day  program, including tracks designed specifically for public, academic and school libraries, will feature keynote authors discussing the nature of the evolving ‘book’ in the digital future and programs that take a closer look at the value of libraries in the eBook space and how libraries can assure their users’ access to eBooks.  Information will also be shared on product use, practical implementation and how technology is affecting the reading experience. Continue reading The LJ/SLJ Digital Shift event is this Wednesday, are you registered?

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit Summary Articles

The 2nd annual LJ/SLJ eBook Summit held on Wednesday offered some fantastic discussions on the implementation of eBooks in a variety of libraries.  Below are links to several articles and blog posts which summarize many of the sessions.

Keynote/State:  Dramatic Growth | LJ‘s Second Annual Ebook Survey

School Library Stas:  LJ/SLJ Ebook Summit: More School Libraries Offer Ebooks; Increased Demand, Rise in Circulation

Keynote:  LJ/SLJ Ebook Summit Panelists Remind Librarians of an Old Creed: Free to All

Academic Panel:  LJ/SLJ Ebook Summit: Academic Panel Tackles PDA, Ebook Discovery

Academic Panel:  LJ/SLJ Ebook Summit: Making Ebooks Visible at Academic Libraries

Public Library Panel:  LJ/SLJ Ebook Summit: Offering Patrons More Than One Delivery Platform

2011 eBook Penetration and Use – LJ/SLJ reports released

Library Journal and School Library Journal released the results of their 2011 survey of eBook Penetration and use today.  The reports are available for purchase (each individually) and a free download of the TOC is available.

More detail on the survey from the site:  Library Journal and School Library Journal‘s 2011 Ebook Penetration and Use survey reports present the most up to date data on how libraries are adopting ebooks and the driving factors behind purchasing and circulation activity in the public, academic, and school (K-12) markets. The 2011 surveys repeat the majority of questions asked in our inaugural 2010 reports and present clear cross comparisons as well as eye-opening trends on how libraries are using this new technology.

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – Hear what it’s all about from Barbara Genco

Yesterday I had a lovely visit with Barbara Genco and Josh Hadro from Library Journal.  We discussed the upcoming LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – eBooks:  The New Normal. Barbara and I recorded a quick interview about the program.  She discusses the organization of the virtual summit, highlights keynote speakers and activities, and offers advice on who should attend the summit.

For those of you who prefer to read the details, or perhaps register for the event, check out the web site – The Digital Shift

Barbara G’s interview, and over 40 others are available on the NSR Interviews page.

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – October 12, 2011

In 2010, Library Journal and School Library Journal brought you our inaugural Virtual Summit on ebooks and the library market, Ebooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point. More than 2,000 participants from the library community joined us for this day-long virtual event to discuss how ebooks are shaping the future of libraries.

This year, we go one step beyond to bring you Ebooks: The New Normal. This one-day virtual conference will bring together public, academic and school librarians (K-12), vendors, publishers, and industry experts to address how libraries are leveraging the ebook opportunity to improve service and reach more users than ever before. The event offers something for everyone, from building an ebook strategy and collection to mastering the transition and even how to market ebooks to patrons.

Registration Now Open

67% of public libraries offer e-books, up 12% – ALA Study

Libraries Connect Communities 2011 coverALA’s 2011 Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study was released today.  According to the press release:  “more than two-thirds (67 percent) of libraries offer access to e-books, up 12 percent from two years ago.”  These numbers fall right in line with the recent Library Journal & School Library Journal e-book survey.  They reported that 72% of public libraries offer e-books.

The ALA Study has multiple pieces available for download.  They include:

American Libraries Digital Supplement Summer 2011

Executive Summary (.pdf)

Library Funding Landscape (.pdf)

Library Technology Landscape (.pdf)

State Summaries (.pdf)

Reports from the Field (.pdf)

Appendix A: 2010-2011 Public Library Funding & Technology Access Survey Questionnaire

Appendix B: Interview Questions

Appendix C: California public library interview participants

Appendix D: Oklahoma public library interview participants

Library Journal/School Library Journal 2011 ebook survey available

From an LJ email:  Library Journal and School Library Journal invite you to participate in our 2011 ebook survey. This data will allow us to trend the changing nature of library ebook collections. Survey results will be shared at our October 12 ebook summit and in upcoming issues of LJ and SLJ.

We want to hear from all public, academic and school libraries, even if your library currently has no ebook collection. You can view a pdf of the survey before answering (recommended!). Please click on the link below to begin.

Click here to get started.

If you complete the survey you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a Nook Color (2 Nook Colors will be given away) or a complimentary registration to our upcoming all-day virtual ebook summit on October 12*. Continue reading Library Journal/School Library Journal 2011 ebook survey available

Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Last summer, Library Journal and School Library Journal conducted an eBook survey for libraries.  The survey was designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences.  They included an academic, public, and school library version of the survey.  Hundreds of questions were asked and hundreds of libraries responded. The results of those surveys were published in November, 2010 in three separate reports.  The executive summaries of each are available on the Library Journal site (and linked below), and full reports are available for purchase.  There were 1,842 respondents, broken down to 364 academic, 781 public, and 697 school libraries.  I’ve captured some of the data to share with you, but the reports are full of additional information on budgets, marketing, barriers to adoption, patron preference, and much, much more.  A primer on ebook readers and formats is in the appendix of each full report. Thanks to Josh Hadro at Library Journal for sharing the reports with me and allowing me to publish some of the data here on No Shelf Required. Continue reading Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with the Publishers Association.

Reprinted in full from Library Journal, October 15, 2010. Francine, you go girl!

Dear Publishers,

We missed you, but, more importantly, you missed out on an opportunity to engage in discussion with a large market already invested in the future of ebooks. ­Library Journal and School Library Journal’s first virtual ebook summit—a daylong event on September 29—focused on how public, academic, and school libraries are addressing digital books. It drew over 2100 registrants who stayed for an average of five and one-half hours. Over 238 libraries purchased site licenses so staff could come and go. At Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, the event drew—and distracted—the entire leadership team from its regularly scheduled meeting. (The summit archive is still available online, until December 31, 2010, at www.ebook-summit.com.) Continue reading Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Yesterday at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion of the acquisition models of eBooks for academic libraries.  We chatted about business models, workflow issues and their opportunities and challenges, the pros and cons of electronic access,and the future of eBooks.  I was pretty busy doing my moderating duties and didn’t get a chance to summarize the program, but luckily some folks at LJ did.  Here is what they had to say: Continue reading Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit Highlights

Wow, what a morning.  The best part of this ebook summit has been following the tweets and chats with some incredibly knowledgeable and creative librarians.  So many good ideas for ebooks in libraries.  My highlights have been on twitter, so feel free to have a look @spolanka or follow the conference at #ebooksummit.

Added to blog post 9/30: There are some addtional summaries of various Summit presentations from the Library Media Diva and the Librarian In Black blogs.  Thanks to the folks at LJ for recording some highlights from the session I moderated – Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a new Best Practice.

The most shocking statement thus far was from Eli Neiberger, Associate Director for IT and Production, Ann Arbor District Library, who said quite bluntly, “libraries are screwed.”  His presentation went on to discuss how the basic premise of the library business is based on owning and loaning print content and that this format is outmoded.  He also said that the value of library collections is in local copy and in a global digital world, the notion of local and copy is worthless.  He believes we will survive if we find ways to reinvent ourselves beyond the circulating collections.  He suggested that libraries become publishers and bring their local communities to the 21st century world by providing a platform for unique experiences.

All presentations are being archived and will be available beginning next week.

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit Preview – eBooks and Academic Libraries

The LJ/SLJ eBook Summit on September 29th offers a variety of speakers and panel discussions relating to eBooks and libraries.  One such session, eBooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice, will discuss the myriad opportunities and challenges in purchasing, acquiring, and accessing eBooks in an academic library.  Speakers, representing publishers, libraries, and consortia, include:  Michael Levine-Clark, an expert on patron driven acquisition from the University of Denver, Emily McElroy, who heads up the eBook Team for the Orbis Cascade Alliance, and Brett Rubinstein, manager of library sales for Springer.  I’ll be moderating the session, live from 3:00 – 3:55 EDT.

Some of the topics our panel will discuss include:

  • acquisitions options
  • the role of aggregators and distributors
  • approval plans
  • managing duplication of content
  • Access and DRM
  • devices
  • shared collections
  • patron driven business models
  • future of ebooks

LJ/SLJ eBook Survey

Library Journal/School Library Journal is sponsoring a survey on eBooks in libraries.  The ebook survey is designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences. This survey is open to all types of libraries, and high level results will presented during LJ/SLJ‘s first ever virtual summit, ebooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point to be held on September 29, 2010. Detailed results will also be reported in LJ and SLJ later in the fall.

There are different versions of the survey for school, public, academic, and special libraries.  All have pdf versions to print/view and then one can return to the site to record the answers.  The academic survey had about 35 questions, some basic demographic questions followed by questions on budget, use of ebooks, expected growth of ebooks, disciplines using ebooks, etc.

LJ’s eBook Summit – September 29th

Mark your calendars for September 29th, the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – eBooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point.  This looks like it will be a fabulous event with great keynote speakers lined up and a diverse selection of panel discussions.  Ray Kurzweill, Kevin Kelly, and David Lankes are featured keynote speakers.  The breakout sessions will feature program tracks for school, public, and academic libraries.  The program is available online, and early bird registration for the VERY LOW price of $19.95 (librarians and students) ends on July 30th.   I’m sure this great price is thanks to the sponsors – OverDrive, Baker and Taylor, Capstone Digital, and Gale/Cengage.

Congrats LJ – this is a wonderful idea and I can’t wait to attend.

Rosen’s Teen Health & Wellness – this is what I call a Reference Experience

I recently attended the School Library Journal (SLJ) Summit and had the pleasure of working with Roger Rosen, of Rosen Publishing, on a panel about the future of digital reference.  Roger spoke about Rosen’s Teen Health & Wellness product.  I finally had a chance to look it over.  WOW, this is what I call a reference experience!

Some highlights:

  • Thousands of resources for teens on topics relevant to them, and written for them – like sexuality, dating, stress, alcohol/drugs, eating disorders, and even acne
  • In The News – a snippet of data from a published news story, with links to additional information in the database.
  • Cast Your Vote – Polls on relevant topics, to see how other teens feel/act.  After viewing the poll results, links to articles on a relevant topic are included
  • HOTLINES (Get Help Now)- easy to find access to a variety of national hotlines (Suicide, AIDS, Alcohol/Drugs, Eating Disorders, etc)
  • Ask Dr. Jan – a place to ask a question and get an answer from a licensed Psychologist
  • Personal Story – a teen story written about a particular situation, like cyberbullying.  Users may then SHARE THEIR OWN STORY by submitting it to Rosen.  Don’t worry, lots of confidentiality controls are in place.
  • Did You Know? – factoids on various health/wellness topics, with links to related articles
  • RSS Feeds of new content from “In The News,”  “Dr. Jan’s Corner,” and “Did You Know?”
  • Each entry is signed, and includes the name of the MD or other medical professional who reviewed the article.
  • Email, print, and cite this source options
  • Links for resources, glossary, and further reading
  • Date last updated for each article
  • Images

Besides the amazing amount of information in the Teen Health & Wellness database, teens have the opportunity to ask questions, write/share their own feelings, and find out how other teens are dealing with situations.  The RSS feeds, polls, and Q/A make this interactive.  The attention to detail in citing, writing, reviewing, and updating make the information very authoritative.  This should be in every household, not just school.  Congrats Rosen!

Gee, reading all of this makes me want to be a teenager again…..NOT!

But, it does make me wonder why these great features aren’t in other databases.  The product seems to build a community.  Can our generic reference ebook collections possibly do that?  I don’t see why not.�