Tag Archives: ResourceShelf

2011 Salem Press Library Blog Awards – Vote Now

Salem Press has once again surveyed the library blog landscape in search of exceptional thinking, writing and information. After sifting through hundreds of nominations, our blog judges have spoken and their votes have been tallied. Forty outstanding blogs, five in each category, came out on top. We now need your help to narrow down the list of finalists.

To vote for your favorite blogs, click Blog Awards. And thanks for participating. Continue reading 2011 Salem Press Library Blog Awards – Vote Now

Resource Shelf Editors Launch InfoDocket and FullTextReports

Gary Price and Shirl Kennedy, formerly the senior editors of Resource Shelf and Docuticker, have now moved on to another complimentary set of news sites – InfoDocket and FullText Reports.  Both of these new sites offer great aggregated content with a new look and feel.

ResourceShelf continues to publish (10+ years) with new editorial staff at http://www.resourceshelf.com/ and is part of the FreePint Family (http://www.freepint.com).

Libraries and the changing role of creators and consumers

A must read OCLC newsletter article written by Andy Havens and Tom Storey – Libraries and the changing role of creators and consumers.  Havens and Storey interviewed Catherine Mitchell from the California Digital Library and Andrew Pate of On-Demand Books.  Topics include:

  • the university as publishers
  • embedded librarians
  • library as publisher (espresso book machine)
  • libraries – searching globally and publishing locally

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

Safari Books Online Expands Mobile Device Options

Safari Books Online has further optimized it’s content for mobile devices.  Notes, tags, and save to custom folders options are now accessible from any mobile device that supports 320×480 screen resolution.  Sharing (even with non subscribers), enhanced categories, and use analytics are also new.  More information is available from Business Wire.  Hat tip to Resource Shelf.

SEBASTOPOL, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Safari Books Online (www.safaribooksonline.com), the leading on-demand digital library for technology, digital media and business professionals, today achieved another milestone in its mobile device strategy – the seamless extension of its popular portal features to mobile devices. Subscribers on the go can now enjoy such popular features as creating notes, tagging and saving content in custom folders. Continue reading Safari Books Online Expands Mobile Device Options

New Articles of Interest

For your weekend reading pleasure:

ModernBookFactory.com: The First Complete Online Audiobook Production and App Development Service for Independent Publishers and Authors

Ebooks: the future is now – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Imagining the Dream e-Tool for Education and Training – Scholarly Kitchen

And the Best File Format for Open Textbook Publishing Is . . .

Future of the Book | American Libraries Magazine

Gutenberg eReader Brings the Entire eBook Library to Google Android Users

Future-Proofing Your E-Books

CBC News – Technology & Science – E-books: A new chapter begins

TeleRead E-Book Primer Part One: What is an e-book?

A Truly Bookless Library – Inside Higher Ed

IBooks App more popular than Facebook and Twitter

ResourceBlog Article: E-Book Roundup: New and Projected Sales Numbers …

Starting an Open Textbook? Think 100 or 200 Level Courses

eBooks in a Textbook World – American Editor

Lonely Planet’s Augmented Reality

Project MUSE to offer eBooks in 2011

Thanks to Resource Shelf for this information.

Project MUSE just announced the launch of an eBook program for 2011, Project MUSE Editions.  There are currently 9 university and institute presses on board with more negotiations in process. From the press release:   Continue reading Project MUSE to offer eBooks in 2011

Articles of Interest

Hot reads this week.  Here’s a list of some good ones:

New from Bowker: Selection of Statistics from Consumer-Focused Research Report for Book Industry « ResourceShelf

The digital era has not made publishers defunct

Kobo Now Supports ePub and PDF files

Google Book Search beneficial to publishing industry, study shows

The ABC’s of E-Reading – Wall Street Journal

Virginia State University Business School Buys E-textbooks for Students

Ebook market share at B&N tops their print book share

66% of Public Libraries in US offering eBooks

The Public Library Funding and Technology Access Study from ALA’s Office for Research and Statistics just released their 2009-10 statistics.  Included in this report was  U.S. public libraries providing access to ebooks – which was 65.9%

A sampling of the % of Libraries Providing E-Books In:

  • Florida–86.9%
  • Hawaii–100%
  • Illinois–46%
  • New York–71%
  • Ohio–83%
  • Oregon–70.8%
  • Washington–48.6

Note: Since e-books are listed in the Internet category we’re assuming these are books downloaded off the Internet from services like OverDrive, Safari, NetLibrary, Books 24×7, ebrary, and others. We’re trying to find out how these numbers and ones to come will count books downloaded once to a Kindle, iPad, nook, or other device and then loaned to many users.

Thanks to Resource Shelf for this information.

HathiTrust Digital Library Visual Search

There is an interesting visual search feature in the HathiTrust Digital Library.  Call number, language, and date, for both the entire HathiTrust collection and public domain works are available.  The visualizations are colorful and created in flash on the screen.  Roll over a piece of the pie and stats will appear, (i.e. DS – History of Asia, 157616 items), click on the pie piece and results for that variable will be displayed.

Here’s a HathiTrust sample chart  – but not interactive.

Thanks to Gary Price from Resource Shelf for showing me this cool feature.

New Articles of Interest

Some things for your weekend reading list:

A Sustainable Future for Open Textbooks? The Flatworld Knowledge Story

E-Texts for All (Even Lucy) | Ebooks and Accessibility

How Does Google Work? Learn How Google Works: Search Engine + AdWords

HOW TO: Self-Publish Anything Online

Newsweek Asks: “Farewell, Libraries?” « ResourceShelf

New Articles of Interest

Wow, ton of good things to read over the last 4 days, here’s a sampling of what I’ve been reading:

Digital Lending Goes into OverDrive

Digital Books Come of Age (Or) The Textbook is Dead; Long Live the Textbook

Kindle 3 vs Kindle 2 in size plus hands-on report by PC World’s Perenson

Cataloging and ILS: SkyRiver Files Antitrust Suit Against OCLC; Innovative Interfaces is Also Part of Suit « ResourceShelf

Final Report on E-Books & Public Libraries from Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA) « ResourceShelf

New Research (Full Text): Not as Web Savvy as You May Think; Young People, Web Search, and Credibility « ResourceShelf

Research-Assignment Handouts Offer Meager Guidance, Survey Finds – Faculty

The Future of the Academic Library – Inside Higher Ed

Demographics of an Audiobook User

Overdrive conducted a study of public library users of audiobooks, surveying 5 of their busiest sites.  The results concluded that audiobook listeners were:

  • 74% of users are female, between the ages of 30-59.
  • Nearly 70% have a college and/or postgraduate degree.
  • 60% learned about the download service from the library’s website (if our past blog posts and training sessions weren’t enough to get you to promote on your website, hopefully this is!)
  • 87% listen to audiobooks on an MP3 player, 44% of which are iPod users.
  • 33% of users own an eBook reader (e.g., Sony Reader, Barnes & Noble nook)
    For those who don’t own an eBook reader, 90% stated that compatibility of eBooks from the library is an important factor.

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

How eBook Catalogs at PL’s drive Publishers Sales

Thanks to Resource Shelf for the tip on this white paper from OverDrive – “How eBook Catalogs at Public Libraries Drive Publishers’ Book Sales and Profits.”

The conclusion states:  “As the market for eBooks continues to develop, the significance of public libraries will grow. Sales of eBooks to public libraries provide publishers with incremental revenue to supplement retail sales of print and digital books. As budgets for digital media at public libraries increase, eBook catalogs will drive sales of print and electronic media. The significant searchability, discovery, and exposure of publishers’ digital content in library catalogs will create more demand in all formats.”

Articles of Interest

Some interesting articles and blog posts these past couple weeks on e-books.  The New Yorker article on the iPad, the Kindle and the future of e-books is particularly good.

Google Book Settlement Market Analysis Q&A – 4/22/2010 – Library Journal

The iPad, the Kindle, and the future of books: newyorker.com

More Texas school districts look at whether to switch to online textbooks

Librarians Discuss E-books During Seminar at London Book Fair « ResourceShelf

Key Findings from New Report: Scholarly Book Publishing Practice Report 2010 « ResourceShelf

Ebook sales up 176.6% in 2009 and passes audiobook sales

Can eBooks Save University Presses?

Faculty Survey Warns of Potential Irrelevance for Academic Libraries, Suggests New Roles – 4/8/2010 – Library Journal

Come On In: The New Improved Open Library!

Several universities to issue iPads to students

International Children’s Digital Library to release iPad app

If you’re a book reader, should you buy an iPad? / The Christian Science Monitor – CSMonitor.com

eBook ISBN Survey

The International ISBN Agency is asking folks to take a 4 question survey about ISBN’s and their relation to eBooks.  For more information, visit the agency’s website. A document from Brian Green, the Executive Director, explaining the need for the survey is linked from the Resource Shelf blog.  Not sure why is wasn’t prominently on the International ISBN website.  Here is a brief statement about the survey with a link.

“Requirements for separate identification of different e-book versions
The International ISBN Agency is trying to establish requirements and the simple 4-question survey is designed to assess both the real needs of users and the ability of publishers to satisfy them.  We would be grateful for your response.”

Brian Green
International ISBN Agency
info@isbn-international.org

New articles of interest

Here’s one in the NYT – Cell Phone Apps Challenge the Rise of eReaders

Publishing Point meeting with Michael Healy, Executive Director, Book Rights Registry

Trial of e-textbook business models to start in UK

Samuelson Says She Has Same Pricing, Privacy Concerns About Google Settlement – 11/18/2009 – Library Journal

E-books go to college, but books still rule the campus, not Kindle — DailyFinance

Universities Boycott Amazon’s Kindle DX

Press Review+: Google Book Search Revised Settlement (2.0) Released; What About Libraries? « ResourceShelf

DOJ Response to the Google Book Settlement

Lots of news and blog sites are reporting on the Dept. of Justice response to the Google Book Settlement.

Teleread has a simple summary, referring folks to the 32 page DOJ official response, Resource Shelf summarizes a variety of news sources, and for a simple overview, see the DOJ Press Release.   The DOJ suggests the parties involved consider several changes to the agreement including:

  • imposing limitations on the most open-ended provisions for future licensing,
  • eliminating potential conflicts among class members,
  • providing additional protections for unknown rights holders,
  • addressing the concerns of foreign authors and publishers,
  • eliminating the joint-pricing mechanisms among publishers and authors, and,
  • whatever the settlement’s ultimate scope, providing some mechanism by which Google’s competitors can gain comparable access.