Tag Archives: O’Reilly Media

O’Reilly Media & Safari Books Online Donate Over $100 Million in Technology Education Resources to US K-12 Schools

Sebastopol, CA—O’Reilly Media, in partnership with Safari Books Online, has committed to making over $100 million in educational content and tools available, for free, to 15,000 schools in America. The donation, announced by President Obama today, supports the ConnectED initiative to enrich K-12 education and provide students with the technological skills they need to be prepared in a globalized, digital economy. Continue reading O’Reilly Media & Safari Books Online Donate Over $100 Million in Technology Education Resources to US K-12 Schools

ProQuest signs O’Reilly Media for ebrary ebooks

2500 titles from O’Reilly Media and other partner publishers are included for the ebrary platform. EBL is not included at this time, but will be in the near future due to the merger of the products.  See more from the press release below:

October 24, 2013 – Palo Alto, CA, USA — Libraries are better equipped to support the academic and professional success of their researchers now that vital technical titles from O’Reilly Media are available on the ebrary platform. Continue reading ProQuest signs O’Reilly Media for ebrary ebooks

OverDrive to provide DRM-free eBook titles from O’Reilly Media

This announcement from OverDrive to offer 1500 DRM free eBook titles from O’Reilly is in relation to the new WIN platform.  Great news!

More from the press release:  OverDrive announced today that booksellers, libraries, and schools in its global network will soon have access to DRM-free eBook titles from O’Reilly Media. The publisher’s entire eBook catalog will be available to OverDrive’s channel partners, including those in the US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and dozens of other territories worldwide. Bestselling eBooks on computer technologies available through the distribution agreement will include: “iPad 2: The Missing Manual, Second Edition,” “Head First Java, Second Edition,” and “Windows 7:Up & Running,” as well as O’Reilly’s legendary ‘animal books’ like “Learning PHP, MySQL, and JavaScript.” Continue reading OverDrive to provide DRM-free eBook titles from O’Reilly Media

TOC – Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

Panelists:  Laura Baldwin, O’Reilly Media and Phil Ollila, Ingram

Laura – reality of our biz, print and retail is still the bulk of the business. Print erosion cost, shipping costs, printing expenses, safety stock, operating capital are all factors in the profit/loss of publishers.

Strategically they wanted to deplete the amount of inventory and instead, make content available anywhere/anytime in a variety of formats. People expect faster cycle times (and not only in production).

Freedom plan – determine how to spend the capital.  Offset/digital short run (much smaller print runs, focused on shelf space awareness), back it up with print-to-order, combined with great forecasting tools. Continue reading TOC – Inventory on Demand in the Digital Age

TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Summary of Tools of Change session, reprinted in full from Teleread.com by Paul Biba

Bill Godfrey (Elsevier), Rich Rothstein (HarperCollins Publishers), Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly Media, Inc.)Moderated by: Abe Murray (Google, Inc. )

Savikas: first foray in 1987. Stared with cd books and online books in 2001, which was first substantial digital presence. Wish is that Amazon would adopt epub as their standard. Digital is now about a decade for O’Reilly, and one of the biggest changes is that there are many more markets for digital products. Can’t imaging what it will be like in 10 years. Book will not go away – neither the package nor the long form narrative type of content. There will be a whole new category of new media that probably can’t be called books any more. Over the last 100 years more and more layers built up between publishers and consumers and web is bringing us back to a more direct relationship. In his experience the interest in enhanced ebooks seems to come from the publishers more than it does from the reader. Now that books can know that they are being read this can lead to enhanced opportunities. Databases are prime examples for turning into enhanced books. Not convinced that advertising will be as much of the future of newspapers and magazines it has been in the passed. Newspapers have lost the monopoly of being a source of local information. There is what value and need for what newspapers provide, but the package is obsolete. Publishers should be taking a stronger role in advocating with the retailers and device makers. Big piece of the epub 3 revision is to support dynamic delivery to different devices. Continue reading TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Does DRM prevent eBook piracy?

No one seems to have this magic answer, but a recent article interviewing Brian O’Leary of Magellan Media offers some insight.  O’Leary described a 2 1/2 year study with O’Reilly media, stating:

“We undertook research two-and-a-half-years ago with O’Reilly, and we’ve been studying Thomas Nelson as well, to measure the impact of piracy on paid content sales. We approached it as if it were cooperative marketing. We would look at the impact of what sales looked like before there was piracy, say for four to eight weeks, and then we’d look at the impact of piracy afterward. Essentially, if the net impact of piracy is negative, then you would see sales fall off more quickly after piracy; if it were positive, the opposite.

Data that we collected for the titles O’Reilly put out showed a net lift in sales for books that had been pirated. So, it actually spurred, not hurt, sales. But we were only looking at O’Reilly and Thomas Nelson. The results are not emblematic of publishing overall. It could be more conservative, it could be less conservative. We just don’t have enough data. I’ve tried to get other publishers to join in, but it really hasn’t been a successful mission. Even at a low- or no-cost offer, publishers seem reluctant to collect the data required to reveal the true impact of book piracy.”

Later in the interview, O’Leary states, “Any good pirate can strip DRM in a matter of seconds to minutes.”  If you’d like to be one of these pirates, a recent blog post on WIRED offers step-by-step instructions on just how to remove DRM from eBook formats, compliments of the Apprentice Alf.

Free Webcast: Publishing without Boundaries

O’Reilly Media is sponsoring a free webcast, Publishing without Boundaries on Thursday, Sept. 30th at 3:45 PDT.  Registration is free.  Here is the synopsis from the site:

Join O’Reilly Media and the Cleveland Digital Publishing User Group for this look at the future of publishing.

Readers are changing their habits, and are demonstrating they’re as eager as ever to find–and buy–quality content and entertainment. But the transition to digital–and increasingly mobile–media delivery, consumption, and participation presents real challenges for publishers: How do you create compelling content on devices that can see, hear, talk, and know where they are in the world? What do publishers need to know about these changes to adapt their own businesses? How do you price a “book” sold as an “App”? How do you take full advantage of a reading experience that’s always connected to the Web? Hear what visionary publisher O’Reilly Media sees on the horizon.

O’Reilly Media offers DAISY formats in ebook bundles

From an O’Reilly Media press release:

For years O’Reilly Media has supplied digital files of our books to Bookshare, a non-profit that provides accessible reading material to the print disabled. For qualifying readers, these ebooks are made available worldwide. And now, through a collaboration with Bookshare, we’ve started making the easy-access DAISY (Digital Accessible Information Systems) formats available within our ebook bundles on oreilly.com for more than 800 titles. Continue reading O’Reilly Media offers DAISY formats in ebook bundles

Cengage Learning Textbooks Available on enTourage eDGe Platform

Brought to my attention by @xplanarob.   I first saw the enTourage eDGe at the O’Reilly TOC conference last February.  I was so intrigued with it I put it in my list of top 10 takeaways from the conference.  It appears the appeal is widespread, as enTourage Systemsâ„¢ and Cengage Learning just announced a partnership to bring e-Textbooks together on the platform.  Some bits and pieces of the press release are below, highlights:  coming this fall, higher education, dual screen, wi-fi enabled, e-reader/tablet/notepad/AV player. Of note, Britannica, Elsevier, Wolters Kluwer, O’Reilly Media, F.A. Davis, and the Univ. of Chicago Press have also partnered with the eDGe. Continue reading Cengage Learning Textbooks Available on enTourage eDGe Platform

10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Earlier this week I attended the O’Reilly Tools of Change (TOC) Conference for the first time.  Over 1250 attendees gathered in New York City to discuss and network   about issues and trends in publishing, in particular, digital publishing.  While much of the information presented was for the publishing industry, I did manage to find several great ideas and concepts that relate to libraries.  I’d like to share these with you, in no apparent order. Continue reading 10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts

Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts – Feb. 22 – 3:30 – 5:00

Cali Bush, O’Reilly Media – Cali is a non lawyer from the O’Reilly legal department.

Cali provided a perspective on eBook contracts from both the publisher and distributor side in 5 segments of her presentation.  While this was publisher/distributor specific, the terms and gotchas and gimmes are important for libraries to think about when reading their own contracts with publishers, aggregators, or distributors.  Cali referred to downstream rights where the rights going from authors to publishers to distributors decreases with each step.  This is an interesting thing to think about.  She didn’t include libraries or end users in her chart, however, but I would imagine they are even further downstream. Continue reading Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts

Tim O’Reilly: Kindle needs open ePub-style standard to survive, from Teleread.org

Tim O’Reilly: Kindle needs open ePub-style standard to survive
www.teleread.org – Posted: 23 Feb 2009 08:40 AM CST
“Unless Amazon embraces open e-book standards like ‘epub,’ which allow readers to read books on a variety of devices, the Kindle will be gone within two or three years.” – Tim O’Reily in Why Kindle should be an open book, in Forbes.

The TeleRead take: It’s hard to tell how things will shake out, but Tim persuasively summons up a little history—Microsoft’s failed attempt with the Microsoft Network publishing platform. By contrast, O’Reilly got on the Web early with the Global Net Navigator and in time was well rewarded for the experience it gained with an open approach.

The point is, closed standards are a pain in the rear for e-book-lovers and other users who inevitably will want hardware or content that isn’t compatible with MegaCorp’s system. This disillusionment is a little akin to decaying Web links. At first, people buy into Mega’s plans and think that its  proprietary product line will endure forever. Only later do the hassles emerge.

E-book lessons from Oprah’s past
Remember how Oprah touted Gemstar e-book readers some years ago? But then consumers rebelled against a limited choice of books. Even now, following her backing of the Kindle, Oprah fans are finding that many O-blessed books are missing. Last I knew, she wasn’t doing a K version of her O magazine. Her fans may also have been put off by the complexities of the technology, to which proprietary formats can add.

While Jeff Bezos can talk of offering every book in E, he’s jeopardizing his own version by aiming for exclusives. What happens when other giants step in and start bidding wars—not just for temporary exclusivity but in time for the permanent variety?

The score that really counts in book-selling

More importantly, Jeff should also remember that the most meaningful score in the book-selling isn’t market share but healthy growth of earnings. Closed standards like the Kindle’s will slow down the rate of e-book adoption, as people find that his supposedly universal solution isn’t one at all.

What’s more, with Kindle-type DRM, all kinds of nasty issues emerge, such as the inability of readers to own their books for real. Jeff was smart enough to set up a music store without DRM. He should consider the the same for e-books, using social DRM, if need be, in place of “real” DRM. Publishers could still have the option of using DRM, but I suspect that market pressures would encourage back off from this consumer nightmare. DRM is especially nasty in that it turns nonproprietary e-formats into proprietary ones.
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