Tag Archives: OCLC

NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition

Very cool news from OCLC/NetLibrary.  Their e-books are now compatible with the Nook as well as the new SONY Daily Edition (they were already compatible with the 4 versions of SONY Readers).  This is a real benefit for libraries who are looking for more e-reader options.  It opens up so many potentials for patron downloads and the use of e-readers by libraries (for circulation).  I hope to see other aggregators and publishers following suit and (fingers crossed) adding more textbooks to the mix.  The press release from OCLC is below.

NetLibrary eBooks compatible with new Barnes & Noble nook, new ony Daily Edition and other popular eBook readers

140,000 eBook titles available for download to portable devices
Continue reading NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition

New articles of interest

OCLC study on characteristics of books in the public domain

Elgan: 7 reasons why e-book readers make lousy gifts this year

Will textbooks be the biggest e-reader market in five years?

Revised Google Book Search Settlement from a Library Perspective | Disruptive Library Technology Jester

HathiTrust offers full-text search of millions of digitized books and journals

Charleston eBook Preconference – eBook standards session

Yesterday at the Charleston Conference we hosted a preconference on eBooks, titled “eBooks: Not just another binding.”  Carolyn Morris from Coutts, James Galbraith from OCLC, Janet Fischer from PCG Industries, and Sue Polanka from Wright State University organized the preconference.  There were 5 sessions on a variety of topics.  The discussion was great, questions were thought provoking, and feedback was excellent.  A great big thanks to all of our speakers for sharing their time and expertise.

The presentations from the sessions will be posted here on the NSR blog.  The first session was on eBook standards, presented by Emilie Delquie of PCG and Randy Petway of Publishing Technologies.  Their presentations are attached below.  Contact information for each speaker is in the slides.

Session 1 – eBook Standards

Our speakers will examine ebook standards from an industry and library perspective, specifically: What standards exist? What standards should exist? What librarians want in the way of ebook standards.

Emilie Delquie, Head of Research, Publishers Communication Group presentation

Randy Petway, Exec Vice President, Strategy & Business Development, Publishing Technology presentation

NetLibrary tops 200,000 eBooks, adds 35 new publishers

Received this press release from Bob Murphy at OCLC:

35 new publishers add more multilingual content to NetLibrary eBook and eAudiobook collections

NetLibrary now offers more than 200,000 eBooks and more than 13,000 eAudiobooks from more than 550 publishers

More titles, more choices for library users worldwide
Continue reading NetLibrary tops 200,000 eBooks, adds 35 new publishers

Recent Articles

Academics, ProQuest, Networks Object to Google Settlement – 9/10/2009 – Library Journal

At Congressional Hearing, Register of Copyrights Slams Google Settlement – 9/10/2009 – Library Journal

So, Can Google Use OCLC Records? Yes, But – 9/10/2009 – Library Journal

This Could Be the Year of Digital Textbooks, if Students Accept Them

The Last Library Is Greater than Google | Peer to Peer Review – 9/3/2009 – Library Journal

When Every Student Has a Kindle | From the Bell Tower – 9/3/2009 – Library Journal

Google, “The Last Library,” and Millions of Metadata Mistakes – 9/3/2009 – Library Journal

Library Groups Step Up Criticism of Google Settlement; Some Academic Institutions Support It – 9/3/2009 – Library Journal

10 most pirated ebooks – not what you think!

The Daily Utah Chronicle – Student association urges U to put more textbooks online

Loaning Kindles

Listened in on a Kindle Loan program at the Handheld Librarian conference today.  Panelists from university and public libraries discussed their current Kindle loan programs.  Some highlights included:

  • Each school had between 4 and 8 Kindles for loan, mostly Kindle 1 and 2
  • Circulation staff handled the loan/fines and the downloading of titles
  • Program started as an ILL service, asking patrons with ILL requests if they were open to using the Kindle/ebook (about 1/2 were willing to during the pilot) Continue reading Loaning Kindles

eBook Standards – summary of NISO/BISG program

Last Friday at ALA I was part of a NISO/BISG panel on the changing standards landscape.  There were many speakers, each discussing various aspects of eBook standards like business models, ISBNs, epub, DRM, and the standards and features needed by librarians (which was my part).  I’ve summarized my presentation here and would welcome additional suggestions and ideas from librarians.  Sue Continue reading eBook Standards – summary of NISO/BISG program

Kirtas teams with OCLC to ease access to digital content

From Teleread.org

By Paul Biba

Picture 2.pngStill another digital deal being done. The more the merrier! From a press release I received from Kirtas:

Kirtas Technologies, the worldwide leader in bound-book digitization, and OCLC, a global online library service and research organization; have signed an agreement that will enable streamlined access to the ever-increasing numbers of digitized books to users of OCLC’s WorldCat and Kirtasbooks.com. Continue reading Kirtas teams with OCLC to ease access to digital content

NetLibrary titles now available on Sony Reader

Sony teams with NetLibrary to offer digital editions and Readers
By Paul Biba

Sony is continuing to market its reader to more and more outlets. That’s only good for e-books as a whole.

In addition to the deal with Harlequin, Sony just announced a collaboration with NetLibrary:

images.jpgThe program includes a Reader model PRS-505, a collection of titles from leading publishers and all required licenses. Using the library’s PC, librarians can download a mobile collection title or titles from the NetLibrary site to the Reader as necessary.

Libraries that purchase Mobile Collections will be able to offer their patrons the ability to check out Readers for onsite or offsite use, depending on the policy established by each library. Collections, selected by NetLibrary’s collections librarian, include Career Development and Business Self Help (30 titles), Management and Leadership (22 titles), Popular Fiction (29 titles), Romance (19 titles) and Young Adult Fiction (24 titles).

Circulating Reader units through OCLC’s newly established program is just one way libraries are able to offer eBooks to their communities and expose people to electronic reading. Thousands of public libraries in the United States already offer online collections that patrons can borrow, typically for two to three weeks. eBooks are offered in the Adobe PDF format and it is expected that the recently established EPUB format will become common.

Sony Teams with NetLibrary to offer digital editions and Readers

From www.teleread.org

Sony teams with NetLibrary to offer digital editions and Readers
By Paul Biba

Sony is continuing to market its reader to more and more outlets. That’s only good for e-books as a whole.

In addition to the deal with Harlequin, Sony just announced a collaboration with NetLibrary:

images.jpgThe program includes a Reader model PRS-505, a collection of titles from leading publishers and all required licenses. Using the library’s PC, librarians can download a mobile collection title or titles from the NetLibrary site to the Reader as necessary.

Libraries that purchase Mobile Collections will be able to offer their patrons the ability to check out Readers for onsite or offsite use, depending on the policy established by each library. Collections, selected by NetLibrary’s collections librarian, include Career Development and Business Self Help (30 titles), Management and Leadership (22 titles), Popular Fiction (29 titles), Romance (19 titles) and Young Adult Fiction (24 titles).

Circulating Reader units through OCLC’s newly established program is just one way libraries are able to offer eBooks to their communities and expose people to electronic reading. Thousands of public libraries in the United States already offer online collections that patrons can borrow, typically for two to three weeks. eBooks are offered in the Adobe PDF format and it is expected that the recently established EPUB format will become common.

eBook programs at ALA Midwinter

If you are headed to Denver in a couple of weeks, see if you have time to pop into one of these panel discussions of eBooks and patron driven acquisition.  If anyone knows of other programs, please let me know.  This was all I could find in the online planner by keyword.

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM on 01/24
OCLC 10 Years of eBooks – What’s Next?
Location: Colorado Convention Center in Room 301

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM on 01/26
PVLR Forum: Patron-Driven Acquisition and Its Impact on Libraries, Vendors, and Publishers
Location: Colorado Convention Center in Room 301

Reference Extract – the answer to a credible search engine?

OCLC, the University of Washington, and Syracuse University are working together to create a “credible” search engine, one that offers results with preference to sites selected by librarians.

According to the press release, “Reference Extract is envisioned as a Web search experience similar to those provided by the world’s most popular search engines. However, unlike other search engines, Reference Extract will be built for maximum credibility of search results by relying on the expertise of librarians. Users will enter a search term and receive results weighted toward sites most often used by librarians at institutions such as the Library of Congress, the University of Washington, the State Library of Maryland, and over 2,000 other libraries worldwide.”

I think this is a fabulous idea, despite what others might think about potential librarian bias, and hope these groups take this idea a few steps further.  Wouldn’t it be great if publishers, data aggregators, and libraries who maintain scholarly content could populate this engine with data from invisible web sources – like catalogs, databases, eBook platforms.  We could bridge the google gap and offer our patrons a true scholarly search engine.  Information industry vendors could advertise, link resolvers could be inserted based on general IP of the user, and librarians across the world could band together to offer a real time chat service on the engine.  Think of the money this could save us on metasearch tools! I know, dream on.�

OCLC and Recorded Books agree to new partnership through NetLibrary

OCLC and Recorded Books have signed an agreement under which Recorded Books eAudiobooks will continue to be available to libraries through NetLibrary.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Bob Murphy +1-614-761-5136
murphyb@oclc.org

Recorded Books will introduce new eAudiobook collections
to libraries through OCLC’s eContent platform

DUBLIN, Ohio, September 12, 2008—OCLC and Recorded Books have signed an agreement under which Recorded Books eAudiobooks will continue to be available to libraries through NetLibrary, OCLC’s platform for eContent.

Under the agreement, OCLC and Recorded Books will market Recorded Books eAudiobooks in North America and other regions around the world.  OCLC and Recorded Books will continue to offer eAudiobook subscriptions and will work together to deliver new products and packages to meet the needs of individual libraries and library groups.

OCLC and Recorded Books settled a contract dispute in November 2007 and agreed at that time that OCLC would market Recorded Books eAudiobooks through August 2008 and service contracts through August 2009.  The new agreement extends and expands the partnership.

“This new agreement will provide continuity to libraries that currently offer their patrons high-quality downloadable eAudiobooks from OCLC and Recorded Books,” said Chip Nilges, OCLC Vice President, Business Development.  “OCLC and Recorded Books are committed to providing libraries with outstanding new eContent services, plans and packages in a new user-friendly environment.”

In October 2008, OCLC plans to release the NetLibrary Media Center, a downloadable application that patrons and libraries will use to manage and access their content.  The new Media Center will offer personalization features and advanced search and browse capabilities.

“We are excited about the broad range of patron-friendly content which we will be able to offer libraries,” said Matt Walker, Recorded Books Vice President, Sales and Marketing.  “Our customers will benefit greatly from the partnership created by Recorded Books’ commitment to quality audio books and OCLC’s commitment to excellence in its digital products.”

Together, OCLC and Recorded Books provide eAudiobooks to more than 500 libraries and 16 library groups.

For more information about Recorded Books eAudiobooks from OCLC, send e-mail to libservices@oclc.org or customerservice@recordedbooks.com.

About OCLC

Founded in 1967 and headquartered in Dublin, Ohio, OCLC is a nonprofit library service and research organization that has provided computer-based cataloging, reference, resource sharing, eContent, preservation, library management and Web services to 60,450 libraries in 112 countries and territories.  OCLC and its member libraries worldwide have created and maintain WorldCat, the world’s richest online resource for finding library materials.  For more information, visit www.oclc.org.

OCLC NetLibrary provides content and technical delivery solutions to institutional libraries, corporations and government agencies that facilitate the purchase, management and distribution of research, reference, digital learning and general interest content via Web-based technologies.  NetLibrary’s eContent solution is the most broadly adopted in the market, making more than 170,000 eBooks, 6,000 eJournals, 7,500 eAudiobooks, and 83 databases available through more than 16,000 libraries worldwide. For more information, visit www.oclc.org/netlibrary/.

About Recorded Books

Recorded Books, a Haights Cross Communications company, produces and distributes unabridged audiobooks and other audio products to public and university libraries and schools, in cassette, CD, and downloadable formats.  Over 7,000 titles are available for adults, children, and young adults in English and Spanish languages narrated by professional, award-winning actors.  Recorded Books also distributes music, educational lectures, independent films, and nonfiction films on DVD.  Packaging is designed for high circulation. One-year warranty, cataloging, processing, and free MARC records are available.  For more information, visit www.recordedbooks.com.