Tag Archives: New York Public Library

Digital Book Clubs — the next chapter in the evolution of Book Clubs


OverDrive has just announced its plans to support public libraries in their efforts to cultivate more reading (and take advantage of the flexibility of the digital format) through Digital Book Clubs. Participating institutions include public libraries in cities like New York and London, among others.

According to recent numbers (from BookBrowse), 22 percent of readers belong to at least one digital Book Club with friends and family.  Efforts by libraries and companies that support libraries to cultivate reading by taking advantage of all that the digital format has to offer are commendable on every level. They are, of course, especially impressive when they involve places and institutions other than the world’s most affluent cities and countries. If the below press release is any indication, our industry is well on its way to reaching (and creating) more readers regardless of their zip code. Continue reading Digital Book Clubs — the next chapter in the evolution of Book Clubs

Open eBooks Opens World of Digital Reading to Children for Free

Major publishers contribute thousands of titles to benefit students in need

February 24, 2016 – Open eBooks, a new initiative and e-reader app that will make thousands of popular, top-selling eBooks available to children in need for free, is launching today. First Lady Michelle Obama is releasing a video today raising awareness of the new opportunity for children. The initiative is designed to address the challenge of providing digital reading materials to children living in low-income households, and offers unprecedented access to quality digital content, including a catalog of eBooks valued at more than $250 million.

President Obama announced a nongovernmental eBooks effort in support of the ConnectED Initiative at the April 30 Kids Town Hall held by the White House at the Anacostia Branch of the District of Columbia Public Library. ConnectED is multi-pronged effort designed to provide all youth with access to high-quality digital learning tools. Since it launched, over 20 million more students have been connected to high-speed broadband in their schools and libraries and millions more are taking advantage of its free private sector resources. Open eBooks complements the new digital infrastructure to provide an opportunity for kids in need to have a world-class eLibrary in their homes. Continue reading Open eBooks Opens World of Digital Reading to Children for Free

Libraries Belong in the eBook EcoSystem

Fabulous post, and summary of the Digital Book World Conference thus far, from Eric Hellman.  He reports on a panel discussion from DBW today, moderated by Josh Hadro at Library Journal.  LJ has a great summary article of the discussion as well.  The topic – why libraries belong in the eBook ecosystem.  Panelists included OverDrive CEO, Steve Potash, New York Public Library Deputy Director Christopher Platt, and big 6 vice president, Random House Director of Account Marketing Ruth Liebmann.  I followed some of the tweets today, which were great.  You can see the stream at #dbwlibrary and #dbw11.

Articles of Interest

Some good reads out there in the blogosphere these last few weeks. Many of these are focused on the electronic textbook and/or implications of such.  Additional articles include analysis on the library and bookstore of the future and a comical video about digital publishing and DRM.

Bookstore of the future: Books Plus?

NYPL Joins HathiTrust, as Repository Expands and Brands – 5/27/2010 – Library Journal

BEA: Tomorrow’s Library in the World of Digits

The model digital library branch: Reality or just a wish?

Videos: Opposing Voices in Digital Publishing, DRM: Terms and Conditions

Academic e-books change students research habits

Best eBook News on Twitter

UC takes e-books for test drive

Business School Director: Kindle DX ‘Not Flexible Enough’ for Students

Will E-book Pressures Send Hardcover Prices Soaring?

New articles of interest

Now bookmarked in my delicious account:

Single Purpose E-Book Readers are Dead – Tennant: Digital Libraries – Blog on Library Journal

Three kinds of e-book illegals: Felix Torres tutorial for NYT columnist Randall Stross and publishers

New York Times columnist fears napsterization of e-books

Library Groups: DOJ Filing “Completely” Changed Landscape for Google Settlement – 9/30/2009 – Library Journal

As Digital Texts Dominate, New Options for Print Arise – 10/1/2009 – Library Journal

In-depth review of four scholarly ebook services

NY Public Library and Kirtas team to make 500K public domain books freely available

Libraries, are you feeling the love?

As was reported earlier, Sony and Overdrive have partnered to promote library e-book collections.  Sony seems to be embracing the library world as its competitive edge.  Why would one want to buy a Kindle and then have to buy content when you can buy a Sony and borrow much content for free?

It’s unlikely that Amazon will be interested in integrating the Kindle with library e-book collections, since the purpose of the Kindle is  to act as a mobile storefront.

It’s been interesting to read blog comments related to the announcement.  There’s a lot of love out there for libraries, and, it seems, a lot of potential customers who are interested in the remote use of library e-collections.

A large part of the integration of Sony and Overdrive is the “Library Finder” feature linked from the Sony Ebook Store.  I’m rather disappointed in the execution of the service.  Instead of being able to search for a title and see which libraries have it, which you can do from the Overdrive site, you first have to search for a local library and then search for a title.

I’m hoping for a Sony integration partner on the academic market side.  There are academic e-book vendors who support the epub format who would be a natural fit for Sony integration.  In the library where I work we’re planning to circulate Sony Readers to support our EBook Library collection.

The Sony press conference was held at New York Public Library.  I’m still trying to figure out if the partnership with NYPL goes beyond the use of the Overdrive collection.  If any NSR readers have some insight please post a comment.