Tag Archives: NetLibrary

E-Books on EBSCOhost eliminates fees

Great news from EBSCO at the ALAMW conference this week.  At the lunch and learn sessions they announced they are eliminating the legacy NetLibrary fees for eBooks.  Here is more information I received from the Senior Director of eBook Products at EBSCO.

Effective February 1, EBSCO will eliminate the legacy NetLibrary fees.  This means eBooks on EBSCOhost will simply be the publisher suggested eBook list price.  So…

  • No markups
  • No set up fees
  • No annual hosting, platform, access or maintenance fees
  • No annual Adobe Content Server subscription fees
  • No download fees
  • No fee for MARC records

…you get the idea — No Markup.  No Fees.  No kidding!

And, through March 31st, all eBooks and Audiobooks purchased on EBSCOhost earn a 5% rebate as part of the Grow Your Collection on Us promotion.

eBooks on EBSCOhost can be ordered via YBP (GOBI); Baker & Taylor’s Title Source or by contacting your EBSCO Publishing sales representative.

CIL Conference – Ebook Publishing: Practices & Challenges

This panel discussion was moderated by Dick Kaser from Information Today.  Speakers included Ken Breen, EBSCO Publishing, Leslie Lees, ebrary, Bob Nardini, Ingram, and Mike Shontz, OverDrive.

Each panelist had 5 minutes to discuss who they serve and business models they offer.

Ken Breen, EBSCO Publishing

EBooks on EBSCOhost preview available

A year after acquiring NetLibraryâ„¢ from OCLC, EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO) is releasing a preview of eBooks on EBSCOhost®. The preview will allow librarians and end users to see how their library’s collection of eBook titles from EBSCO/NetLibrary is being integrated into EBSCOhost, allowing for a more comprehensive and powerful search experience. Current customers will be able to explore their own eBook collections on EBSCOhost. The preview is designed to showcase the look and feel of eBooks on EBSCOhost and provide a live environment for librarians and users to test and trial the functionality. Continue reading EBooks on EBSCOhost preview available

eBooks on EBSCOhost adds 24 new subject collections

EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO) has released 24 new eBook subject sets for the eBooks on EBSCOhost product (the “soon to be” former NetLibrary). The subject sets are part of a rapidly growing collection of eBooks that are offered in convenient collections grouped by subject matter. For more information, visit the EBSCO Publishing Web site at: www.ebscohost.com, or contact: information@ebscohost.com.

The 24 new subject sets that are now available include: Continue reading eBooks on EBSCOhost adds 24 new subject collections

Are you weeding eBooks from your collection?

I picked up this post about weeding eBooks from a colleague who monitors collib-l.  I asked the originator, Gary Daught, if I could post it here as well.  Please feel free to respond as Gary (and I) would love to hear your feedback.  If you prefer to email, Gary is at GFDaught@milligan.edu.

Greetings. We now have well over 70,000 e-books in our holdingsa figure quickly approaching 50% of our entire book collection. A majority of these titles were purchased through our consortium as NetLibrary or other vendor collections.

This summer we began an earnest and long-overdue weeding of our print collection. We weed not only to recover/reduce shelf space but also to remove items that are dated, out-of-scope, or lacking in other desired academic qualities. It’s a lot of work as you well know. This second reason to weed got me thinking about our e-books. We don’t have to worry about shelf space with e-books. However, I can imagine that there are titles among our e-books that should also be weeded. Yes, it’s simple enough to suppress an item record from the OPAC. But how are we going to work through +70,000 titles?! Continue reading Are you weeding eBooks from your collection?

Charleston Conference – E-Content Integration

Michael Gorrell, Sr. VP and CIO of EBSCO, discussed several challenges that EBSCO (and other publishers/vendors) are experiencing while integrating content. Some of these challenges include:

  • licensing content from a diverse set of sources
  • processing heterogeneous content homogenously
  • searching everything with precision and breadth at the same time
  • displaying different data so that their uniqueness can be evident

EBSCO’s approach to processing content is to start with database design (bibliographic) and determine which fields the data supports, how the end user will search the data, and what transformations are necessary for display and searching.  When possible, they provide editorial expertise by indexing and adding their own metadata, using controlled vocabulary. They also run their own search engine which allows them to take advantage of the unique data in library records and use it to influence the relevancy of results.  When displaying multiple content types they want to make sure to highlight the individual features of each format.   Continue reading Charleston Conference – E-Content Integration

ebrary’s PDA Model is Finally Live

ebrary announced today the launch of the much awaited patron driven acquisition model.  It’s been a couple of years in the making, received considerable testing, and was grown from librarian demand and suggestions.  A brief history:

ALAMW Conference, 2009.  ebrary hosted a session to discuss patron driven acquisitions and many librarians were there to offer suggestions.

January, 2010, the PDA pilot testing is extended while ebrary conducts additional surveys.

October, 2010 – The ebrary PDA model is Live!

The key features of the PDA model, from the ebrary press release include: Continue reading ebrary’s PDA Model is Finally Live

Archiving eBooks, librarians are you concerned?

What if your eBook aggregator or perhaps the publisher with whom you now own over 5,000 eBook titles went belly up next week?  What if OCLC and EBSCO never purchased NetLibrary, where would your titles have gone?  Perhaps the 100 titles you’ve bought for your personal Kindle are no good when the device disappears due to newer technology. Are you concerned about accessing the eBook content you’ve purchased in perpetuity?  Is the lack of eBook archiving preventing you from purchasing eBooks? Are Portico, LOCKSS, or CLOCKS suitable solutions for archiving eBooks?  I’m looking for your opinions and concerns on eBook archiving for a Charleston Conference presentation on this very topic.  Please leave your comments or send me a direct email at sue.polanka at wright.edu

Thanks!

Public Libraries, Why aren’t you lending nook, Kobo, COOL-ER and SONY eReaders?

I’m really curious about this, and reading a blog post from the Librarian in Black, which summarized a library futures event has gotten me even more curious.

Most public libraries who are lending eBook readers (at least those in the news) are loaning Kindles.  Why aren’t they lending nook, Kobo, COOL-ER, and SONY readers?  Kindle readers are not compatible with any of the library eBook aggregator content and require that libraries purchase titles again, in the Kindle format.  But nook, Kobo, COOL-ER, and SONY readers ARE compatible with some OverDrive and NetLibrary titles because they are in Adobe Digital Editions or PDF formats.  Am I missing something here?  Isn’t is plausible that a public library with large OverDrive and NetLibrary collections could pre-load already purchased content onto a compatible device and lend the device and the title to the patron? The Kobo reader comes loaded with 100 free titles.  Many free eBooks can be loaded onto these devices as well (even the Kindle is open to some of these).

Is it the fine print? Is it the content?  Or is it lack of knowledge on devices?  Your input on this issue is much appreciated.

LYRASIS eBook Expo – 4th session, virtual attendance option

On Tuesday, October 5th LYRASIS is hosting the 4th in its eBook Expo series. This free event with both in-person and virtual components will look at the timely topics of patron driven acquisition and discovery of ebooks.   Speakers include:

Interview with NetLibrary’s Scott Wasinger about changes to NetLibrary

Last Friday I had a great discussion with Scott Wasinger, the Senior Director of Sales for eBooks and eAudiobooks for NetLibrary.  Scott and I discussed how EBSCO is implementing the NetLibrary content into the existing EBSCOhost interface, what changes we can expect to see with the Netlibrary interface, new plans for business models, and how the input from librarians is helping them to shape the future of NetLibrary.

During our interview, Scott mentions screen captures available for preview – NetLibrary EBSCOhost screenshots.

Comments can be sent to: information@ebscohost.com.

Questions for Scott can be directed to his email at swasinger@ebscohost.com.

Listen to all of the NSR interviews, found on our interviews page.

EBSCO now Offering Text-to-Speech in all Databases

EBSCO Publishing recently announced the added feature of text-to-speech support for all EBSCOhost® databases. The read aloud function is available at no cost through technology from Texthelp Systems.

The functionality allows users to read along while a human-sounding voice speaks the text on the screen. Users have the ability to read-aloud by selected text, sentence, paragraph, or continuous reading with dual color synchronous highlighting (highlighting of the passage being read with a second color highlighting the specific word being read aloud at that moment).

User control of read-aloud personalizes the learning experience for each user. Users can control reading speed as well as select between three different high-quality voicesAmerican, British, or Australian. These options also enable teachers and professionals to incorporate the features as a tool for teaching English and reading.

I’m anxious to see if the new EBSCO ebooks platform (NetLibrary) will offer text-to-speech for the entire book.  Hoping so!

Ask An Aggregator…. Would You?

If you had top executives from 4 academic eBook aggregators in the same room, what would you ask them?  Seriously, I need to know.  One of the Lively Lunch sessions at the XXX Annual Charleston Conference is an open forum with academic eBook aggregators from ebrary, EBL, Ingram, and NetLibrary.   I’m looking for suggestions on questions to ask these individuals.  I’m moderating and want to make this as informative and interesting as I can! Continue reading Ask An Aggregator…. Would You?

66% of Public Libraries in US offering eBooks

The Public Library Funding and Technology Access Study from ALA’s Office for Research and Statistics just released their 2009-10 statistics.  Included in this report was  U.S. public libraries providing access to ebooks – which was 65.9%

A sampling of the % of Libraries Providing E-Books In:

  • Florida–86.9%
  • Hawaii–100%
  • Illinois–46%
  • New York–71%
  • Ohio–83%
  • Oregon–70.8%
  • Washington–48.6

Note: Since e-books are listed in the Internet category we’re assuming these are books downloaded off the Internet from services like OverDrive, Safari, NetLibrary, Books 24×7, ebrary, and others. We’re trying to find out how these numbers and ones to come will count books downloaded once to a Kindle, iPad, nook, or other device and then loaned to many users.

Thanks to Resource Shelf for this information.

eBook platform comparison chart

I’m not sure how I didn’t find this earlier, but thanks to a colleague, Erik Christopher, I am now aware of the JISC eBook comparison chart. It is available on the JISC site at http://www.jisc-adat.com/adat/adat_ebooks.pl and offers a comparison of up to 7 different eBook platforms including:  Credo Reference, NetLibrary, ebrary, EBL, MyiLibrary, Dawsonera, and Taylor and Francis eBookstore.  Over 50 functional features are compared with basic Y/N responses including search, access control, search results, linking, restrictions, exporting, etc.  All data is supplied by the vendors.  They are obviously missing some reference eBook databases, so I hope Gale, SAGE, ABC-CLIO, Oxford, Rosen, and others can hop on board this chart.  If anyone is shopping for eBook platforms, or if publishers are considering launching an eBook site, this is a great place to go for ideas and industry standard features.

They also offer a comparison chart for scientific databases.

Publishers beef up on eBook offerings

Today’s LJ Academic Newswire reported on Database Marketplace 2010.  They listed several new interfaces and features from eBook publishers.  For the full story, visit the LJ Academic Newswire. Continue reading Publishers beef up on eBook offerings

New Articles of Interest

I’m way behind on posting links to articles I’ve bookmarked in delicious.  There’s been so much activity in the industry these last few weeks that I can’t keep up.  So, here is a long list of things I’ve found from the past month.

Amazon Ups the Anti in eBook Price Wars; Rumors Say Apple is Shaky on iPad Content for Launch

Focusing on WorldCat, OCLC Sells NetLibrary to EBSCO, Thins FirstSearch – 3/17/2010 – Library Journal

Another publisher discovers free e-books lead to greater sales

Results for Read an EBook Week 2010 by Rita Toews

Ebooks as a textbook saver: can it work for some students?

The Case for Textbooks | American Libraries Magazine Continue reading New Articles of Interest

The New NetLibrary…..is on EBSCOHost

Wow, big news from OCLC and EBSCO yesterday.  NetLibrary and several FirstSearch databases were purchased by EBSCO.  This is very exciting news for eBooks I think.  Soon, the 170,000 plus NetLibrary eBooks (and audiobooks) will be indexed and available on the EBSCOHost platform, as well as remaining on the NetLibrary platform.  No word yet if the eBook content will be a separate database or be indexed within other EBSCO databases.  One can only hope for the ladder to increase the discovery and use of eBooks.   The full press release is online.  Hopefully the EBSCOHost platform will be more printer friendly!

NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition

Very cool news from OCLC/NetLibrary.  Their e-books are now compatible with the Nook as well as the new SONY Daily Edition (they were already compatible with the 4 versions of SONY Readers).  This is a real benefit for libraries who are looking for more e-reader options.  It opens up so many potentials for patron downloads and the use of e-readers by libraries (for circulation).  I hope to see other aggregators and publishers following suit and (fingers crossed) adding more textbooks to the mix.  The press release from OCLC is below.

NetLibrary eBooks compatible with new Barnes & Noble nook, new ony Daily Edition and other popular eBook readers

140,000 eBook titles available for download to portable devices
Continue reading NetLibrary titles compatible with Nook and SONY Daily Edition

NetLibrary tops 200,000 eBooks, adds 35 new publishers

Received this press release from Bob Murphy at OCLC:

35 new publishers add more multilingual content to NetLibrary eBook and eAudiobook collections

NetLibrary now offers more than 200,000 eBooks and more than 13,000 eAudiobooks from more than 550 publishers

More titles, more choices for library users worldwide
Continue reading NetLibrary tops 200,000 eBooks, adds 35 new publishers