Tag Archives: Library Journal

Articles of Interest – Kindle edition

A summary of the various articles about Amazon’s announcement to work with libraries via OverDrive, plus a couple of others on Amazon.

Kindle Library Lending and OverDrive — What it means for libraries and schools – OverDrive blog post

Amazon to Allow Library Lending of Kindle Books (Updated) Library Journal

Librarian’s Hope for a “Seamless Experience” with Amazon Kindle – Library Journal

Amazon Continues to Push Book innovation with Library Lending and Ad-Supported Kindles – Scholarly Kitchen

After Kindle Lending, the Deluge « LJ Insider

Amazon to launch library lending for Kindle books – USATODAY.com

Kindle Library Lending Announcement Raises Questions – Information Today

Library eBooks Coming to the Kindle – eBookNewser

Amazon To Bring Ebook Lending to Local Libraries – Mashable

Kinboox — New eBook Lending Site Launched – eBookNewser

SEC is Investigating Amazon About the Sales Tax Disputes – eBookNewser

Achtung! German Kindle Store Opens – eBookNewser

“26” not set-in stone, OverDrive challenged on access fees

Two great articles in Library Journal yesterday.  The first article summarized the comments of Josh Marwell, president of sales at Harper Collins regarding the 26 check-out rule.  Marwell sat on a panel as part of “eBooks: Collections at the Crossroads,” a symposium organized by the Connecticut Library Consortium (#clctrendspotting, #clcebooks).

Clip from article:

“Is 26 set in stone? No. It’s our number for now, but we want to hear back. Immediately. Honestly, it doesn’t make sense that one size fits all. We consider it a work in progress. But this is the number that we have now,” he said.

“I invite you to test the water. Use it. Give us feedback. We’re in the water. We want to be here,” he said, noting that the company wants to sell ebooks to libraries and has been doing so for ten years. Marwell pointed out that HarperCollins has been hearing “quietly” from some librarians who are going to see how the new policy works for them.

“We try to be intelligent about our policy,” he said. “And when we landed on 26, the information that we had was that most books don’t circulate 26 times. In terms of the long tail, this particular number probably works for a different part of the collection. We realize it doesn’t work for the best sellers.” Continue reading “26” not set-in stone, OverDrive challenged on access fees

North Carolina libraries receive grant to develop new eBook business models & make statements on values

Library Journal reported today that the four universities that make up the Triangle Research Libraries Network received a $41,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation to develop new models for consortial ebooks pricing and acquisition.

From LJ:  “Some answers to the ebook model dilemma may be in the offing, from the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN)a collaborative organization of the libraries of North Carolina-based Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and North Carolina Central Universitywhich announced that it has received a $41,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop new models for consortial ebook pricing and acquisition.”

A colleague also forwarded to me today a value statement for the Scholarly Ebook Marketplace from North Carolina State University.  It is reprinted below in full. Continue reading North Carolina libraries receive grant to develop new eBook business models & make statements on values

Digipalooza III to be held July 28-31, 2011

From OverDrive (note one of the sponsors at the bottom):  Public and school librarians from around the world will come together with publishing industry leaders at OverDrive’s third international user group conference, Digipalooza (www.digipalooza.com), July 28-31, 2011, in Cleveland. Held every two years, this four-day educational and networking conference will address the massive surge in library eBook borrowing with panels on industry trends, best practices, marketing and outreach, and upcoming enhancements to the OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) service. A roundtable featuring representatives from several of the world’s leading publishing houses will provide librarians with the chance to ask questions, in-person, about the future of library eBook lending. Continue reading Digipalooza III to be held July 28-31, 2011

Articles of Interest: Harper Collins Edition 2

For the week of March 11th:

IGI Launches Advances in Library Information Science Newsletter

IGI Publishing launched the inaugural issue of the Advances in Library Information Science (ALIS) Newsletter today.  The newsletter provides a value-added tool that gives a pre-publication, no-strings-attached glimpse into the library and information science content.  The Editor-in-Chief for the IGI ALIS series is Mirela Roncevic, formerly with Library Journal.

In the first newsletter, the forthcoming title edited by Sue Polanka, E-Reference Context and Discoverability in Libraries: Issues and Concepts, is highlighted offering eight essays.  The full book, to be released in the fall of 2011, boasts over 20 unique chapters on the issues and concepts surrounding reference content, written by  thirty-one contributors representing academic, public, and school libraries, publishers, library school professors, and other information industry professionals.

More information about the ALIS newsletter .

Read the preface of the forthcoming E-Reference title.

Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Last summer, Library Journal and School Library Journal conducted an eBook survey for libraries.  The survey was designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences.  They included an academic, public, and school library version of the survey.  Hundreds of questions were asked and hundreds of libraries responded. The results of those surveys were published in November, 2010 in three separate reports.  The executive summaries of each are available on the Library Journal site (and linked below), and full reports are available for purchase.  There were 1,842 respondents, broken down to 364 academic, 781 public, and 697 school libraries.  I’ve captured some of the data to share with you, but the reports are full of additional information on budgets, marketing, barriers to adoption, patron preference, and much, much more.  A primer on ebook readers and formats is in the appendix of each full report. Thanks to Josh Hadro at Library Journal for sharing the reports with me and allowing me to publish some of the data here on No Shelf Required. Continue reading Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Libraries Belong in the eBook EcoSystem

Fabulous post, and summary of the Digital Book World Conference thus far, from Eric Hellman.  He reports on a panel discussion from DBW today, moderated by Josh Hadro at Library Journal.  LJ has a great summary article of the discussion as well.  The topic – why libraries belong in the eBook ecosystem.  Panelists included OverDrive CEO, Steve Potash, New York Public Library Deputy Director Christopher Platt, and big 6 vice president, Random House Director of Account Marketing Ruth Liebmann.  I followed some of the tweets today, which were great.  You can see the stream at #dbwlibrary and #dbw11.

ProQuest to Digitize 30,000 rare early books from National Library of the Netherlands

January 11, 2011 (ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — ProQuest will digitize more than 30,000 rare early books from the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (KB), the National Library of the Netherlands, capturing every volume in high-resolution color scans. This is the third major European national library to participate in ProQuest’s Early European Books project after the Danish Royal Library, Copenhagen and the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze in Italy. As with the agreements in Denmark and Italy, the material will be free to access in the host country. Continue reading ProQuest to Digitize 30,000 rare early books from National Library of the Netherlands

Oxford University Press Creates Online Platform for University Press Content

From an OUP Press Release I received via email:  January 11, 2011 – Oxford University Press is pleased to announce the creation of a groundbreaking online platform for university press monograph content. Having redeveloped the award-winning Oxford Scholarship Online platform, OUP is launching University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO) and inviting the University Press community to take advantage of a fully enabled XML environment with the cutting edge search and discovery functionality that has marked the success of Oxford Scholarship Online. Continue reading Oxford University Press Creates Online Platform for University Press Content

Using Bluefire Reader to Download Library eBooks

There have been several blog posts this week about using the BlueFire Reader application to download eBooks from library collections to various iOS devices.  Josh Hadro from Library Journal has a great post with step-by-step instructions and screen shots.  Other posts, not as detailed as Josh’s, include:

CNet – Bluefire Reader brings free public-library e-books to iOS

Another post from the Download Squad site offers a brief description with a couple of screen shots.

Articles of Interest

Three misperceptions about the ebook business

Textbooks headed for ash heap of history?

A Student’s Stranded On A Desert Island … Tech Devices

Inside the Google Books Algorithm – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

iTunes U Introduces Free eBooks: Download Shakespeare’s Complete Works

Joe Wikert’s Publishing 2020 Blog: eBooks: Lending vs. Reselling

Forrester Research on future of ebooks: $3 billion by 2015

Will Your Local Library Lend E-Books? (Or Can They?)

Library eBooks on the iPad/iPhone, no Sync Required – Library Journal

Kindle Facts and Figures (history & specs)

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with the Publishers Association.

Reprinted in full from Library Journal, October 15, 2010. Francine, you go girl!

Dear Publishers,

We missed you, but, more importantly, you missed out on an opportunity to engage in discussion with a large market already invested in the future of ebooks. ­Library Journal and School Library Journal’s first virtual ebook summita daylong event on September 29focused on how public, academic, and school libraries are addressing digital books. It drew over 2100 registrants who stayed for an average of five and one-half hours. Over 238 libraries purchased site licenses so staff could come and go. At Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, the event drewand distractedthe entire leadership team from its regularly scheduled meeting. (The summit archive is still available online, until December 31, 2010, at www.ebook-summit.com.) Continue reading Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Yesterday at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion of the acquisition models of eBooks for academic libraries.  We chatted about business models, workflow issues and their opportunities and challenges, the pros and cons of electronic access,and the future of eBooks.  I was pretty busy doing my moderating duties and didn’t get a chance to summarize the program, but luckily some folks at LJ did.  Here is what they had to say: Continue reading Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit Highlights

Wow, what a morning.  The best part of this ebook summit has been following the tweets and chats with some incredibly knowledgeable and creative librarians.  So many good ideas for ebooks in libraries.  My highlights have been on twitter, so feel free to have a look @spolanka or follow the conference at #ebooksummit.

Added to blog post 9/30: There are some addtional summaries of various Summit presentations from the Library Media Diva and the Librarian In Black blogs.  Thanks to the folks at LJ for recording some highlights from the session I moderated – Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a new Best Practice.

The most shocking statement thus far was from Eli Neiberger, Associate Director for IT and Production, Ann Arbor District Library, who said quite bluntly, “libraries are screwed.”  His presentation went on to discuss how the basic premise of the library business is based on owning and loaning print content and that this format is outmoded.  He also said that the value of library collections is in local copy and in a global digital world, the notion of local and copy is worthless.  He believes we will survive if we find ways to reinvent ourselves beyond the circulating collections.  He suggested that libraries become publishers and bring their local communities to the 21st century world by providing a platform for unique experiences.

All presentations are being archived and will be available beginning next week.

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit Preview – eBooks and Academic Libraries

The LJ/SLJ eBook Summit on September 29th offers a variety of speakers and panel discussions relating to eBooks and libraries.  One such session, eBooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice, will discuss the myriad opportunities and challenges in purchasing, acquiring, and accessing eBooks in an academic library.  Speakers, representing publishers, libraries, and consortia, include:  Michael Levine-Clark, an expert on patron driven acquisition from the University of Denver, Emily McElroy, who heads up the eBook Team for the Orbis Cascade Alliance, and Brett Rubinstein, manager of library sales for Springer.  I’ll be moderating the session, live from 3:00 – 3:55 EDT.

Some of the topics our panel will discuss include:

  • acquisitions options
  • the role of aggregators and distributors
  • approval plans
  • managing duplication of content
  • Access and DRM
  • devices
  • shared collections
  • patron driven business models
  • future of ebooks

LJ/SLJ eBook Survey

Library Journal/School Library Journal is sponsoring a survey on eBooks in libraries.  The ebook survey is designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences. This survey is open to all types of libraries, and high level results will presented during LJ/SLJ‘s first ever virtual summit, ebooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point to be held on September 29, 2010. Detailed results will also be reported in LJ and SLJ later in the fall.

There are different versions of the survey for school, public, academic, and special libraries.  All have pdf versions to print/view and then one can return to the site to record the answers.  The academic survey had about 35 questions, some basic demographic questions followed by questions on budget, use of ebooks, expected growth of ebooks, disciplines using ebooks, etc.

LJ’s eBook Summit – September 29th

Mark your calendars for September 29th, the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit – eBooks: Libraries at the Tipping Point.  This looks like it will be a fabulous event with great keynote speakers lined up and a diverse selection of panel discussions.  Ray Kurzweill, Kevin Kelly, and David Lankes are featured keynote speakers.  The breakout sessions will feature program tracks for school, public, and academic libraries.  The program is available online, and early bird registration for the VERY LOW price of $19.95 (librarians and students) ends on July 30th.   I’m sure this great price is thanks to the sponsors – OverDrive, Baker and Taylor, Capstone Digital, and Gale/Cengage.

Congrats LJ – this is a wonderful idea and I can’t wait to attend.

Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Each Friday before the ALA Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) gets together to have a program and discussion of issues surrounding reference publishing.  The ALA Annual meeting was no exception.  A large group of publishers and librarians gathered to figure out, “how did we get here?”  A panel of librarians, LIS instructors, reference contributors, and wholesalers, organized by Peter Tobey at Salem Press, presented some thoughts and challenges for reference content and reference publishing.  A summary of these comments is below.  The panelists included:  Buffy Hamilton, a teacher/librarian from Creekview H.S. in Canton, GA and blogger at The Unquiet Librarian and 1/4 blogger for Libraries and Transliteracy;  Sue Polanka (me);  Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean of the Madden Library, CSU – Fresno;  Bernadette Low, a frequent contributor to reference content from the Community College of Baltimore City;  William Taylor, Manager, Continuations iSelect (R) and Standing Orders at Ingram Content Group;  and Jessica Moyer, a doctoral candidate in literacy education at the U of Minnesota and instructor of a MLIS reference course. Continue reading Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Articles of Interest

Some good reads out there in the blogosphere these last few weeks. Many of these are focused on the electronic textbook and/or implications of such.  Additional articles include analysis on the library and bookstore of the future and a comical video about digital publishing and DRM.

Bookstore of the future: Books Plus?

NYPL Joins HathiTrust, as Repository Expands and Brands – 5/27/2010 – Library Journal

BEA: Tomorrow’s Library in the World of Digits

The model digital library branch: Reality or just a wish?

Videos: Opposing Voices in Digital Publishing, DRM: Terms and Conditions

Academic e-books change students research habits

Best eBook News on Twitter

UC takes e-books for test drive

Business School Director: Kindle DX ‘Not Flexible Enough’ for Students

Will E-book Pressures Send Hardcover Prices Soaring?