Tag Archives: iPod

OverDrive releases the Media console app for BlackBerry

Public, school, and college libraries now provide direct EPUB eBook downloads on BlackBerry® mobile devices with the free OverDrive® Media Console™ app for BlackBerry. Users at more than 13,000 libraries worldwide can wirelessly download and enjoy EPUB eBooks, as well as MP3 audiobooks, on their BlackBerry devices. Libraries offer best-selling titles, such as “The Social Animal” by David Brooks and “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett, which can be borrowed and enjoyed using OverDrive’s app for BlackBerry. Popular business eBooks and audiobooks, as well as titles in virtually any subject, are also available from the library using the BlackBerry app.

The OverDrive app for BlackBerry is available from OverDrive’s website and the MobiHand Superstore. The app will also appear in BlackBerry App World™ in the coming weeks. To see if your library is a member of the OverDrive network, visit OverDrive Search. Continue reading OverDrive releases the Media console app for BlackBerry

OverDrive Media Console app for iPad – direct library eBook & audiobook downloads

From an OverDrive Press Release: Public, school, and college libraries now provide direct eBook downloads on the iPad® with the free OverDrive® Media Console™ app. The optimized app enables users at more than 13,000 libraries worldwide to wirelessly download and enjoy eBooks and digital audiobooks from a local library on the Apple® device. Popular and best-selling titles, including “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson, “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand, and “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins, are a few of the Most Downloaded Books from the Library (www.overdrive.com/mostdownloaded). These digital books and more in popular genres like romance, mystery, thriller, and virtually every subject can now be borrowed from libraries and enjoyed in an optimized iPad app.

The OverDrive Media Console app for iPad is available in the App Store (http://bit.ly/OverDriveApp). To see if your library is a member of the OverDrive network, visit http://search.overdrive.com. Continue reading OverDrive Media Console app for iPad – direct library eBook & audiobook downloads

200% increase in eBook checkouts from OverDrive virtual libraries….and more stats

From an OverDrive press release:  Libraries and schools worldwide were at the forefront of the eBook boom in 2010, as patrons and students downloaded millions of digital books for iPhone®, Android™, Sony® Reader, NOOK™, and personal computers. More than one million new users signed on to access free eBooks, audiobooks, and more from ‘Virtual Branch’ websites last year, resulting in a 200 percent increase in eBook checkouts and a 52 percent increase in audiobook checkouts over 2009. To find eBooks, audiobooks, music, and video titles from a library near you, visit http://search.overdrive.com.

Key statistics for library eBooks, audiobooks, and more from OverDrive-powered digital catalogs include: Continue reading 200% increase in eBook checkouts from OverDrive virtual libraries….and more stats

OverDrive apps for iPhone and Android enable direct library downloads

OverDrive (www.overdrive.com) has released apps for iPhone® and Android™ that enable users to download library eBooks and audiobooks directly to their devices for the first time. The free apps include a “Get Books” feature that guides users to their local library’s digital catalog of best-selling and new release titles, allowing them to easily browse, check out, and download with just their device. More than 13,000 public libraries, schools, colleges, and universities now offer eBook and audiobook downloads via OverDrive, including institutions in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, and nine other countries. Continue reading OverDrive apps for iPhone and Android enable direct library downloads

SciVerse ScienceDirect app for iPhone, iPod, iPad

Elsevier is now offering a mobile app for iOS, including the iPhone, iPod, and iPad.  It’s a free download from the iTunes store.

From an Elsevier email:

Did you know?

  • Users of SciVerse ScienceDirect and Scopus can now search for and download peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters from their iPhone
  • They can also be informed when approaching other published peers, researchers and professors they meet on-campus and at conferences by finding relevant publication information instantly when they want it
  • Users can get the right answers when they need them with 25 percent of the world’s trusted scientific content in their pocket

Download SciVerse Mobile Apps

iPhone apps SciVerse ScienceDirect and SciVerse Scopus Alerts are FREE to download to your iPhone for subscribers of ScienceDirect and Scopus.

OverDrive will demo digital downloads at National Book Festival

From an OverDrive press release:

OverDrive’s Digital Bookmobile (www.digitalbookmobile.com) will demonstrate digital book downloads available from America’s public libraries at the 2010 National Book Festival (www.loc.gov/bookfest) on Saturday, September 25, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on the National Mall in Washington, DC. This high-tech 18-wheeler and mobile exhibit offers hands-on demonstrations of download services available 24/7 from more than 11,000 libraries worldwide.

Digital Bookmobile visitors will be able to browse a library’s download website; sample eBooks, digital audiobooks, music, and video on interactive PC and Mac® computer stations; learn how to download; and test compatible devices including the Sony® Reader, nookâ„¢, iPod®, Zune®, and Smartphones—all loaded with digital titles from the library. Continue reading OverDrive will demo digital downloads at National Book Festival

Demographics of an Audiobook User

Overdrive conducted a study of public library users of audiobooks, surveying 5 of their busiest sites.  The results concluded that audiobook listeners were:

  • 74% of users are female, between the ages of 30-59.
  • Nearly 70% have a college and/or postgraduate degree.
  • 60% learned about the download service from the library’s website (if our past blog posts and training sessions weren’t enough to get you to promote on your website, hopefully this is!)
  • 87% listen to audiobooks on an MP3 player, 44% of which are iPod users.
  • 33% of users own an eBook reader (e.g., Sony Reader, Barnes & Noble nook)
    For those who don’t own an eBook reader, 90% stated that compatibility of eBooks from the library is an important factor.

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

OverDrive Audiobook App Now Available in Android Market

from an OverDrive Press Release:

OverDrive Audiobook App Now Available in Androidâ„¢ Market
Android app enables wireless audiobook downloads from libraries and booksellers

Cleveland, OH – February 11, 2010 – OverDrive (www.overdrive.com), the leading global distributor of audiobooks and eBooks to libraries and retailers, announced that its audiobook app for Android™ is now out of beta and available as a full release. OverDrive’s audiobook app for Android enables users to wirelessly download MP3 audiobooks from more than 10,000 libraries and major online retailers, including Barnesandnoble.com, BooksOnBoard.com, and Borders.com. Major devices, including DROID™ by Motorola®, DROID Eris™, and Nexus One™, can now be used to access OverDrive-supplied MP3 audiobooks on the go. To install OverDrive® Media Console™ for Android v1.0, visit the Android Market on your device or download directly from http://overdrive.com/software/omc. Continue reading OverDrive Audiobook App Now Available in Android Market

OverDrive Expands International Distribution for eBooks & Audiobooks

From an OverDrive Press Release:

OverDrive Expands International Distribution for eBooks & Audiobooks
Leading booksellers and libraries in Australia, Brazil, Germany, India, Norway, and the UK join global network

(Las Vegas, NV, January 5, 2010) – Consumer Electronics Show – OverDrive (www.overdrive.com), the global leader in eBook and audiobook distribution, announced today that it recently entered into agreements with top booksellers, publishers, and libraries on five continents. OverDrive will demonstrate its global network and success in enabling access to 400,000 digital books on popular devices, including PC, Mac®, iPod®, iPhone®, Zune®, Sony® Reader™, nook™, and DROID™ by Motorola®, at CES booth #12145 on January 7-10, 2010.
Continue reading OverDrive Expands International Distribution for eBooks & Audiobooks

Webinar Summary- Consumer Book Trends 2009 – Hosted by Bowker & AAP

Attended the Bowker/AAP webinar on consumer book trends for 2009.  This focused on Q3 numbers in 2009 with a close look at 2 user groups -  18 – 29 year old males and 30 – 40 year old females.  My notes are below, pardon the typos, was typing fast and furious to catch the data.

the Speakers:

  • Tina Jordan, VP AAP – moderator
  • Kelly Gallagher, VP Publishing Services, Bowker – speaker

Bowker announced yesterday that 1/3 Americans cutting down on book purchases Continue reading Webinar Summary- Consumer Book Trends 2009 – Hosted by Bowker & AAP

NetLibrary tops 200,000 eBooks, adds 35 new publishers

Received this press release from Bob Murphy at OCLC:

35 new publishers add more multilingual content to NetLibrary eBook and eAudiobook collections

NetLibrary now offers more than 200,000 eBooks and more than 13,000 eAudiobooks from more than 550 publishers

More titles, more choices for library users worldwide
Continue reading NetLibrary tops 200,000 eBooks, adds 35 new publishers

OverDrive Releases Digital Audiobook Application for Windows Mobile(R)

A press release from Overdrive, September 9, 2009

First in a Series of Mobile Apps for Over-the-Air Downloading From Booksellers and Libraries

(Cleveland, OH) – September 9, 2009 – OverDrive (www.overdrive.com), the leading global distributor of digital audiobooks and eBooks to libraries and retailers, announced the release of the first in a series of free digital book applications for mobile devices. OverDrive® Media Console(TM) for Windows Mobile® (http://overdrive.com/software/omc) enables users with Windows Mobile phones to wirelessly download audiobooks, music, and video to their devices and play the titles with the same superior navigation features of OverDrive’s desktop software. To view a list of supported devices including Sprint Palm Treo(TM), AT&T Samsung Jack(TM), and Verizon HTC Touch Pro(TM), visit http://www.microsoft.com/windowsmobile/en-us/devices/default.mspx.
Continue reading OverDrive Releases Digital Audiobook Application for Windows Mobile(R)

Overdrive and Sony to cross-market

From an Overdrive press release:

(Cleveland, OH) – August 12, 2009 – OverDrive (www.overdrive.com), the leading global digital distributor of eBooks and audiobooks to libraries, announced today a joint marketing agreement with Sony Electronics, Inc., developer of the Sony Reader Digital Book (www.sony.com/reader).  OverDrive and Sony will cross-market OverDrive’s library network and the Reader, the leading eBook device that is compatible with industry standard eBook formats offered by libraries.  Continue reading Overdrive and Sony to cross-market

Nicolas Baker on the Kindle

Nicolas Baker, famous within libraries for Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper (2001),  has written an article about the Kindle for the New Yorker.  Not much surprising, general kvetching: the Kindle doesn’t work well with images, text to speach is not an audiobook, not every book is available, etc.  but I think it is interesting to see ebooks capturing such a large part of the popular culture’s attention.

The only part I think Mr. Baker missed the mark was in the reader chat forum.  A reader asks:

“Do you see e-readers, including the Kindle or even iPod, playing any role in libraries? Or perhaps can you foresee libraries having a role in providing content to such devices? Librarians have played a huge role in my reading life and I’m not ready to cede that role over to Amazon or bn.com at the moment.”

In his response, Mr. Baker mentions print on demand machines and then adds, “but if all books become electronic, the task of big research libraries remains the same—keep what’s published in the form in which it appeared.”

Library = warehouse

Gale’s PowerSearch 2.0 launched with several new features


Farmington Hills, Mich., June 24, 2009 – Gale, part of Cengage Learning, today announced the launch of PowerSearch 2.0, an enhanced version of the original PowerSearch platform which provides the library community comprehensive access to authoritative reference, periodical and primary source information, providing greater “power to the user.”

PowerSearch 2.0 simplifies browsing through Gale’s more than 20,000 publications, providing the ability to search across more than 150 million documents. The new interface provides users a Web-like experience and includes added features that will appeal to and empower library patrons, students and other researchers. Continue reading Gale’s PowerSearch 2.0 launched with several new features

British Library support of e-book readers

From RI Newsline:
Over the next three months readers at the British Library can try out three e-book readers from Sony and iRex Technologies … Devices on display include the Sony Reader, the iRex DR1000 and the iLiad.
From the press release, “Offering a hugely versatile reading experience, e-readers have seen an explosion of interest in recent months, with leading publishing experts suggesting that the industry has finally hit its ‘iPod moment’.”

Finally, a Textbook Program for Students with Disabilities

Being part of the Wright State University community has given me a whole new perspective on students with disabilities.  Approximately 10% of our population is part of this community.  It is very difficult for these students to get their textbooks and other course material in a format appropriate to their needs.  That has just been made easier with the announcement of the U.S. College and University Partnership with Bookshare.  Bookshare is the largest accessible online library for people with print disabilities.  Their press release contains all the details of this new program.  Text of this release is also below, click on more.   Continue reading Finally, a Textbook Program for Students with Disabilities

FTC Digital Rights Management town hall meeting: summing up

From Teleread, author not listed:

FTC Digital Rights Management town hall meeting: summing up

Posted: 26 Mar 2009 09:39 AM PDT

I have had a day to think about what I saw at the FTC’s town hall meeting on Digital Rights Management yesterday, and what it might mean for the future of DRM. The conference fell into the classic “good news, bad news” scenario.

Unrealistic Expectations

The good news is that the FTC is now more aware than ever of the difficulties to consumers implicit in Digital Rights Management (especially since they received over 800 public comments, which they admitted during the meeting they had not managed to work all the way through yet). The bad news is that it is not the FTC’s brief to adjudicate matters relating to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and fair use, or even anti-trust concerns relating to non-interoperable DRM.

The FTC is chiefly concerned with unfair and deceptive business practices. (For example, in the other big FTC story of the day, the FTC announced yesterday it was suing Dish Network for making telemarketing calls to people listed on the national Do Not Call Registry.)

If companies make deceptive statements in advertising about the limitations of their DRM, the FTC will look into it. If companies release DRM that harms the consumer (as in the infamous Sony rootkit debacle), they will investigate and possibly sanction. But they can’t do anything to let you copy DVDs to your video iPod when the DMCA forbids it. Talk to Congress about that.

That being said, the meeting was of great interest just for the open discussion of DRM among big guns from both consumer-advocacy and commercial trade groups. Anyone who did not realize DRM was a contentious issue before would certainly have gotten an earful.

Potential Remedies

Though some speakers were not terribly exciting (one read a ten-minute prepared statement in a sleep-inducing monotone; another rambled on at length about a “thought experiment” involving taking a bus full of developing-country representatives to a shopping mall that made no sense either during or after the speech), most of them had good points to make, pro or con.

Several potential DRM remedies were discussed, including

  • a logo-based disclosure system like ESRB or MPAA ratings so consumers would be able to see at a glance what DRM was on a product
  • making DRM systems more interoperable, or adding “exception handling” so DRM would permit more fair uses
  • DRM-using companies depositing keys and source code in escrow so that if they went bankrupt consumers would be able to crack the DRM and have access to the media they paid for afterward.

These took on a character of “pie in the sky,” however, given that imposing such solutions is generally outside the FTC’s brief. For example, making DRM more interoperable would be difficult given that companies generally have a vested interest in making sure their DRM works for them alone. (Apple’s stranglehold on the digital music industry due to its Fairplay DRM was brought up more than once.)

The FTC Takes Questions

One of the more interesting panels to me was the very last, in which representatives of the FTC got in the hot seat to field questions and comments as to what they might actually do about DRM. The answer: as stated above, not a whole lot.

Nonetheless, the first question fielded was one that I emailed, and I was even mentioned by both real name and moniker. (I had asked that TeleRead be mentioned as the source, but they forgot.) I pointed out that Amazon owned the Mobipocket e-book format, currently used by many of its e-book competitors, and asked what the FTC would be willing to do if they decided to stop licensing that format.

The FTC panel replied that they could not address specific what-if scenarios, but they could talk about similar investigations they had done in the past. They talked about their investigation into Microsoft when Microsoft wanted to get out of the music business and shut down its DRM servers—meaning that consumers would no longer be able to play the music they had bought from Microsoft. They closed the investigation after Microsoft agreed to keep its servers turned on.

All in all, the FTC town hall meeting was an interesting event, and worthwhile in that it fostered public discussion and debate about DRM that might end up educating more people about its disadvantages. But those who expected any solid commitments will be left disappointed.

Other Coverage

Here is a roundup of other articles I have found covering the town hall meeting.

Oren’s Weblog has excellent panel-by-panel summaries of the event (though Oren did not chronicle the sixth panel, in which the FTC answered questions about what measures it might take):

Content Agenda looks at the meeting here; the Copyright and Technology blog has coverage here. Brad’s Reader looks at some implications for e-books here. Here is a PDF article laying out a system of logo-based disclosure of DRM on download products of the sort that was proposed at the meeting.

Ars Technica also has an article summing up the first few panels that came before the lunch break.

Cleveland Public Library offers EPUB

CLEVELAND, OH, Jan 15 (MARKET WIRE) —
Cleveland Public Library (http://emedia.clevnet.org) today became the
first public library to offer eBook downloads in the industry standard
EPUB format. Readers at both Cleveland Public Library and CLEVNET member
libraries can check out and download EPUB eBooks from the library’s
download website. The EPUB files are optimized for the Sony(R) Reader and
can also be read on a PC or Mac(R) with free Adobe(R) Digital Editions
software. More than 8,500 libraries powered by OverDrive
(www.overdrive.com) will soon be able to offer eBooks in the EPUB format,
along with more than 150,000 titles in audiobook, eBook, music, and video
formats, many of which are compatible with both Mac and iPod(R).

Patron-defined lending periods will also be available for the first time
today at http://emedia.clevnet.org. The new feature allows libraries to
offer a variety of borrowing options, such as 7, 14, or 21 day lending
periods. Fast readers can now select a shorter checkout time, allowing
them to borrow more titles from their library. Patron-defined lending
periods, EPUB eBooks, and other upcoming enhancements will be
demonstrated at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting 2009
(http://www.ala.org/ala/conferencesevents/upcoming/midwinter/home.cfm) on
Jan. 23-26 (Booth #2042).

EPUB is a reflowable, XML-based format for eBooks and other digital
publications developed by the International Digital Publishing Forum
(www.idpf.org) and adopted by leading publishers and technology firms as
the industry standard for eBooks. OverDrive, an IDPF member company, is
the only library download service that supports EPUB and integrates the
format into a single platform for delivering digital audiobooks, eBooks,
music, and video to library customers. More information on the EPUB
format is available at
http://overdrive.com/resources/mediaformats/eBooks.asp.

“EPUB eBooks are enhanced for mobile reading with reflowable text to fit
any screen and are compatible with the Sony Reader,” said David Burleigh,
director of marketing for OverDrive. “Major publishers such as Hachette
Book Group USA, Random House, and HarperCollins offer eBooks to libraries
in this emerging standard format, so library customers will be able to
enjoy award-winning and best-selling EPUB eBooks with just their library
card and an Internet-connected computer.”

“Introducing the EPUB format in the library market will enhance the eBook
experience for library patrons, as well as accelerate the wide-spread
adoption of this standard for digital reflowable text,” said Michael
Smith, executive director of the IDPF. “More publishers are utilizing
EPUB as they digitize front and backlist titles to provide a greater
selection for digital library patrons.”

OverDrive distributes thousands of EPUB eBooks from top publishers. EPUB
eBooks by James Patterson, Stephenie Meyer, David Sedaris, Janet
Evanovich, Elmore Leonard, Lisa Kleypas, and Brad Meltzer will soon be
available to libraries powered by OverDrive. Popular and best-selling
EPUB titles will also be available, including “Dewey: The Small Town
Library Cat,” “Things I’ve Learned from Women Who’ve Dumped Me,”
“Twilight: The Complete Illustrated Movie Companion,” and “Gossip Girl.”

All EPUB eBook downloads from the OverDrive-powered library download
website are borrowed just like a print book. A library customer can browse
a library’s digital catalog for titles, check out a title with a library
card, and download the eBook to his or her home computer. The titles can
be transferred from the library customer’s home computer to a Sony Reader
PRS-505 (with proper firmware installed) or PRS-700 using the Adobe
Digital Editions software. At the end of the lending period, the file
automatically expires and Adobe Digital Editions prompts the user to
delete the title from his or her computer.

OverDrive powers download media catalogs at thousands of libraries
worldwide, including institutions in New York, Singapore, Boston, and
Toronto. To see if your library is a member of the OverDrive network,
visit http://search.overdrive.com. OverDrive also operates the Digital
Bookmobile (www.digitalbookmobile.com), a high-tech 18-wheeler that
travels coast-to-coast raising awareness about free library downloads.

About OverDrive

OverDrive is a leading full-service digital distributor of eBooks,
audiobooks, music, and video. We deliver secure management, DRM
protection, and download fulfillment services for hundreds of publishers
and thousands of libraries, schools, and retailers serving millions of
end users. Founded in 1986, OverDrive is based in Cleveland, OH.
www.overdrive.com

Contact:
David Burleigh
OverDrive, Inc.
216-573-6886 x218
Email Contact

OverDrive now works with Zune

If you are one of the 8,500 libraries using the OverDrive Media Console for digital audiobooks, you now have a new feature – compatibility with Microsoft’s Zune.  Both DRM-free and DRM-protected (Digital Rights Management) audiobooks are compatible.  This now opens up the direct transfer of audiofiles to Zune, iPod, and virtually all other mp3 devices.

For the full story, check out OverDrive’s press release.

or, skip the full story and just download the Media Console.