Tag Archives: Internet Archive

Internet Archive, a nonprofit offering an overwhelming amount of free content (and triggering some copyright debates)

 

internet archive

This week’s Free Content Alert column considers the Internet Archive, and it’s a bit complex. Not that I want it to be, but it typifies DRM issues. If you bear with me, I believe you’ll find the result worthwhile.

First, the straightforward part: Internet Archive (IA)  is a true nonprofit, founded in 1996, and headquartered in San Francisco. According to a lengthy wiki on IA, its size was 15 petabytes. (A petabyte is 10 to the fifteenth power in bytes, or a million gigs.) Its stated mission is to provide “universal access to all knowledge.” The basic stats are staggering. Wiki continues,

It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, software applications/games, music, movies/videos, moving images, and nearly three million public-domain books…In addition to its archiving function, the         Archive  is an activist organization, advocating for a free and open Internet. The Internet Archive allows the public to upload and download digital material to its data cluster, but the bulk of its data is collected automatically by its web crawlers, which work to preserve as much of the public web as possible. Its web archive, the Wayback Machine, contains over 150 billion web captures. The Archive also oversees one of the world’s largest book digitization projects. Continue reading Internet Archive, a nonprofit offering an overwhelming amount of free content (and triggering some copyright debates)

New Jersey eBook Summit Summary – part two

Please note that the part two blog post has now been added to the New Jersey eBook Summit Summary.

Today the NJ State Library, LinbraryLinkNJ- The NJ Library Cooperative, NJ Library Association and the NJLA Reference Section sponsored an E-book Summit in Eatontown, New Jersey.  The line-up of speakers included:

  • Eli Neiburger, Ann Arbor District Library
  • Sue Polanka, Wright State University Library & No Shelf Required
  • Robert Miller, Director of Books, Internet Archive
  • Mary Minow, Attorney, Consultant, and Former Librarian
  • Joseph Sanchez, University of Colorado – Denver Continue reading New Jersey eBook Summit Summary – part two

New Jersey Ebook Summit Summary

Pictured from left to right:  Eli Neiberger, Patricia Tumulty, Mary Minow, Norma Blake, Robert Miller, Sue Polanka, Cheryl O’Connor, Joseph Sanchez, Peggy Cadigan.

Today the NJ State Library, LinbraryLinkNJ- The NJ Library Cooperative, NJ Library Association and the NJLA Reference Section sponsored an E-book Summit in Eatontown, New Jersey.  The line-up of speakers included:

  • Eli Neiburger, Ann Arbor District Library
  • Sue Polanka, Wright State University Library & No Shelf Required
  • Robert Miller, Director of Books, Internet Archive
  • Mary Minow, Attorney, Consultant, and Former Librarian
  • Joseph Sanchez, University of Colorado – Denver Continue reading New Jersey Ebook Summit Summary

World eBook Fair – 6.5 million ebooks available through August 4th

The World eBook Fair runs from July 4 through August 4, 2011. Their goal is to provide Free public access for a month to 6.5 Million eBooks.  Project Gutenberg and the Internet Archive are both contributing organizations and will be presenting a number of items in other media this year, including music, movies and artwork, even dance choreography.  The collections include light and heavy reading materials, more reference books, scientific items, etc., and about 50,000 music entries in addition to the 12,000 that debuted last year.

All are welcome to join the World Public Library as well for an annual membership of $8.95 per year.  Members can download a selection of about 2,000,000 PDF eBooks.

Internet Archive to preserve print

Brewster Kahle posted on the Internet Archive blog this week about plans to preserve print books.  Kahle states, “books are being thrown away, or sometimes packed away, as digitized versions become more available. This is an important time to plan carefully for there is much at stake.”   As a result, they are building a facility to preserve print copies of every book, record, or movie they are able to acquire.  Much more information is in the blog post, including photos of the new facility.

Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

From Eric Hellman’s blog, Go To Hellman – The fourth section my book chapter on Open Access eBooks looks at theier relationship with libraries.  I previously posted the Introduction,  What does Open Access mean for eBooks and Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books. I’ll be posting one more section, a conclusion.

Thank you for all of your comments; the completed chapter (and OA eBook) will be better for them.

Libraries and Open Access E-Books
One of the missions of libraries is to provide access to all sorts of information, including e-books. If an e-book is already open access, what role is left for libraries play?

Here’s a thought-experiment for libraries: imagine that the library’s entire collection is digital. Should it include Shakespeare? Should it include Moby Dick? These are available as public domain works from Project Gutenberg; providing these editions in a library collection might seem to be superfluous. Many librarians have been trying to convince their patrons that “free stuff on the Internet” is often inferior to the quality information available through libraries. There are certainly e-book editions of these works available for purchase with better illustrations, better editing, annotations, etc. Should libraries try to steer patrons to these resources instead of using the free stuff? Continue reading Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

Internet Archive’s Brewster Kahle talks about the In-library Lending Program

Last week the Internet Archive announced the launch of a traditional In-Library Lending model for a pooled collection of over 80,000 eBooks.  The program, available on openlibrary.org, provides access to the ebooks through a web browser and download technology.  I had a chance to interview Brewster about the new program in my NSR audio interviews.  The full press release on the In-Library Lending program is available at the Internet Archive.

The interview with Brewster is also available on the NSR interviews page, along with about 35 others.

Internet Archive Library Partnership Develops Joint eBook Collection To Extend Traditional In-Library Lending Model

The Internet Archive and 150 partnering libraries announced the launch of a traditional in-library lending model for a pooled collection of over 80,000 eBooks.  Yesterday the pooled collection was released to the public — providing access through web browser and download technology. The full press release is available at the Internet Archive, clips from the post are below.

The new cooperative is hosted on OpenLibrary.org, a site where it’s already possible to read over 1 million eBooks without restriction. During a library visit, patrons with an OpenLibrary.org account can borrow any of these lendable eBooks using laptops, reading devices or library computers.

How it Works
Any OpenLibrary.org account holder can borrow up to 5 eBooks at a time, for up to 2 weeks. Books can only be borrowed by one person at a time. People can choose to borrow either an in-browser version (viewed using the Internet Archive’s BookReader web application), or a PDF or ePub version, managed by the free Adobe Digital Editions software. This new technology follows the lead of the Google eBookstore, which sells books from many publishers to be read using Google’s books-in-browsers technology. Readers can use laptops, library computers and tablet devices including the iPad. Continue reading Internet Archive Library Partnership Develops Joint eBook Collection To Extend Traditional In-Library Lending Model

HathiTrust and OCLC Develop WorldCat Local Prototype

DUBLIN, Ohio, January 18, 2011—OCLC and the HathiTrust have developed a unique WorldCat Local user interface for discovery of items accessible through the HathiTrust Digital Library. The WorldCat Local prototype (http://hathitrust.worldcat.org) for the HathiTrust Digital Library was designed and implemented by both organizations in close cooperation as a means to further develop a shared digital library infrastructure. The WorldCat Local interface for the HathiTrust Digital Library is based on the WorldCat database, and will run along with the current HathiTrust catalog during the prototype testing period. Continue reading HathiTrust and OCLC Develop WorldCat Local Prototype

ALAMW – ALA Washington Office Program on eBooks

Saturday, January 8th, ALA’s Washington Office is presenting, Turning the Page on E-books, a moderated discussion on the challenges and opportunities for libraries and their patrons from 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. in the Convention Center, Room 02.  Panelists and speakers include:  Brewster Kahle, Digital Librarian and Founder of the Internet Archive; Tom Peters, CEO of TAP Information Sources (huge contributor to the COSLA Report); Rich Weingarten, information technology and policy consultant, and Sue Polanka, moderator of No Shelf Required. Come and join the discussion.

Articles of Interest

New Book About eBooks in Libraries – Release in August

I’m thrilled to inform you that No Shelf Required: E-books in Libraries will be released in late August.  This edited book, published by ALA Editions, discusses a variety of eBook topics for school, public, and academic libraries.  Since I have a bit of clout with the publisher, I’m able to release the TOC and introduction for your review and consideration.  It is below.  Of course, it will be available in a variety of eBook formats, and print too. Continue reading New Book About eBooks in Libraries – Release in August

Public Libraries and the Future of E-books: COSLA Report

COSLA, the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies, conducted a study on the future of eBooks and eBook readers in public library.  Their findings and suggestions:

  • low cost, library friendly devices will not be a problem
  • improve library purchasing power through consortia
  • pursue eReader certification by libraries
  • investigate discovery services like Internet Archive’s Book Server
  • be champions of self-publishing and feature these offerings in collections
  • research pricing/sales to determine that library eBooks are not a threat to a publisher’s bottom line
  • gain awareness of copyright and fair use issues that may threaten their services
  • repurpose their space (less print titles) and consider new services

The COSLA eReader Task Force was led by Oregon State Librarian Jim Scheppke. Other members were California State Librarian Stacey Aldrich, Kansas State Librarian Jo Budler, and Massachusetts State Librarian, Rob Maier. They worked with Eva Miller of Pinpoint Logic, a Portland-based research and design consulting firm, and Tom Peters of TAP Information Services, and Kansas-based library consulting firm.

Hat tip to Resource Shelf

World eBook Fair in Full Swing

The World eBook Fair, sponsored by Project Gutenberg, Internet Archive , World Public Library, and a multitude of others is in full swing, now until August 4th.  This is the 5th annual fair, with over 3.5 million free PDF eBooks available for download. Access is free for one month, after which users are encouraged to join the World Public Library for the small fee of $8.95 per year. About 750,000 titles are available for PDF download from the World Public Library.

Openlibrary.org offers thousands of free eBook downloads

Great article in the WSJ from June 29th summarizing the Internet Archive’s initiative for openlibrary.org.  The IA along with several libraries, plans to digitize and make available thousands of eBooks for public download to a PC/MAC or reading device.  According to the WSJ article, “with its latest project, the organization is making inroads into the idea of loaning in-copyright books to the masses. Only one person at a time will be allowed to check out a digital copy of an in-copyright book for two weeks. While on loan, the physical copy of the book won’t be loaned, due to copyright restrictions.”

Symposium on Economics of Sustaining Digital Information

Received this information from an OCLC Press Release:

Blue Ribbon Task Force to Host Symposium on Economics of Sustaining Digital Information

Government, Industry, Academic Leaders Featured in Public “Conversation”
April 1, 2010 in Washington, D.C.

The Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access (BRTF-SDPA) will hold a one-day symposium convening a diverse group of speakers from the academic, private, and public sectors to discuss one of the most pressing issues of the Information Age: identifying practical solutions to the economic challenges of preserving today’s deluge of digital data.

Continue reading Symposium on Economics of Sustaining Digital Information

Comments on Google Book Search Settlement Coming to a Head (Again)

Ah, it is the beginning of September when thoughts turn to going back to school, the days turn a little colder (in the northern hemisphere) and the smell of lawsuit briefs is in the air. Well, okay — the latter might not be what you expect, but this is a special September, after all. Postponed from MayL1, the deadline for filing comments in the Google Book Search settlement is coming up. And everyone is weighing in (”again” for some) on the details of the settlement. A couple of highlights.

The American Library Association (ALA), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL)L2 again offered its support for the settlement, if only the court would promise to extend vigorous oversight of pricing and privacy practices of Google and the Books Rights Registry. This came in the form of a supplemental filingL3 to the briefL4 the three organizations filed in MayL5 (just prior to the first comment deadline). Continue reading Comments on Google Book Search Settlement Coming to a Head (Again)

eBook Fair – 2 million free eBooks

The World eBook Fair runs from July 4th to August 4th, 2009.  The goal of the fair is to provide FREE public access to 2 million eBooks for one month.  Sponsors include Project Gutenberg, World Public Library, Ask.com, Internet Archive, and more. After the fair, readers may continue to access about 1/2 million ebooks for a small monthly fee, a subscription to the World Public Library.

Google Book Search Settlement

Posting on behalf of Peter Murray, OhioLINK, full post at:  http://dltj.org/article/gbs-summary/

Today was to be the deadline for objecting to, opting out of, and/or filing briefs with the court on the Google Book Search Settlement. That was the plan, at least, when the preliminary approval statement from the court was issued last year. That deadline changed, and that is part of a recent flurry of activity surrounding the proposed Settlement. In honor of the original deadline, this e-mail provides a summary of recent news and an index of documents that you might want to read for more information. Continue reading Google Book Search Settlement