Tag Archives: International Digital Publishing Forum

TOC – EPUB 3 Update

EPUB 3 update panel included Robert Kasher (Book Masters), Keith Fahlgren (Threepress Consulting Inc.), George Kerscher (Daisy Consortium), Bill Kasdorf (Apex Content Solutions)

EPUB 3 was just announced this morning by the IDPF.  The final draft of standard being readied for release at BEA 2011.  http://idpf.org/epub/30 – public release of standard here, ready for comment, looking for lots of comment/feedback from the international community.  They have a great “human readable” document to give everyone an overview/introduction of what this is.

A few items of interest from the presentation are below.  Lots more tweets at #toccon

Accessibility Issues – DAISY consortium have been an integral part of the development of EPUB 3. Accessibility features are woven throughout EPUB 3.  Some key features:  reading order will be well defined, ability to use navigation center to go to different areas of the book, page numbering that is aligned with the print counterpart, semantic structure will be enriched.

Metadata side of things – this standard is designed to be backwards compatible.  New model is built on Dublin CORE and uses a tiny subset of RDFA 1.1.  Not just books!  This will work with other formats too – newspapers, magazines, etc.

Multimedia – now have a way to embed multimedia into EPUB.  Also inheriting richer multimedia – MathML, SVG, allow more of the app like experience, etc.

Concluded with Collective Soul’s “Better Now”

EPUB logo is here

The new ePUB logo is here.  Considering the camel text, I guess I will now start typing ePUB instead of EPUB. The logo is available in color, black/white, and gray scale versions from the IDPF site.  The IDPF held a contest for the logo design and it was won by Ralph Burkhardt of Stuttgart, Germany.  The contest gleaned 203 entries from 18 countries.

EPUB logo contest

The IDPF is hosting a contest for the design of the EPUB logo.  All individuals, companies, educational institutions and other groups are eligible to submit entries.  Entries must be received by May 7th at 2400 hours.  The winning design will receive $1000 cash and two tickets to attend the IDPF Digital Book 2010 at BEA.  For more information, see the IDPF website.  Thanks to teleread for the tip.

New Articles of Interest

Bill Clinton Pens New Britannica Article on Dayton Accords

IDPF elections: Faster e-book standards-making expected—given BOTH presidential candidates’ platforms

Springer Group, Second-Leading STM Publisher, Sold by/to Private Equity Firms – 12/11/2009 – Library Journal

Canadian Private School Switches to Sony e-Readers   – 12/9/2009 8:28:00 AM – Publishers Weekly

Baker & Taylor Acquires Blackwell North America, Will Merge into YBP – 12/7/2009 – Library Journal

eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar summary

I attended the eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar today.  My notes (done real time, please excuse typos) are below.

Speakers:  SarahRotman Epps, Forrester Analyst and Michael Smith, IDPF Executive Director Continue reading eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar summary

Webinar on eBook Standards

Thanks to TeleRead for the heads up on this one.

eBook  Readers and Standards…..Where to Next?

Webinar, November 18th, 11:00 EST

Speakers:  Michael Smith, Director of the IDPF and Sarah Rotman Epps, eBook Market Analyst at Forrester

As the eBook market rapidly unfolds, it seems to get more complex by the day. Publishers are struggling to adapt as competitive and consumer pressures demand that their titles be compatible with the multitude of new eBook applications and eReaders coming to market. To develop a successful eBook production strategy, you need to take a clear position on where the market is today and will be tomorrow. In this 60-minute webinar, Sarah Rotman Epps, Forrester’s eBook Market Analyst, and Michael Smith, Director of the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) which manages the ePub standard, present their highly informed views on the future for eBook readers, formats and standards. How will it all shake out? Join these two industry experts to get the inside track on the future and better position yourself to take advantage of the biggest driver of industry innovation to hit the publishing world in decades – eBooks.

register

EPUB maintenance to begin this month

An IDPF Press Release:

IDPF Launches EPUB Standards Maintenance Work

The EPUB standards are open and living specifications, rapidly gaining momentum. The members of the working group are committed to assisting with corrections and improvements to the EPUB standards that will lead to wider adoption and greater accessibility.

Toronto, Canada (PRWEB) August 16, 2009 — The International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF), the standards and trade association for digital publishing, announced that the maintenance activities associated with the EPUB standards will start this month. The DAISY Consortium has stepped forward to provide leadership and resources to assist in the maintenance for the EPUB standards. The working group charter was unanimously approved by the IDPF membership. Continue reading EPUB maintenance to begin this month

Ebook sales continue to rise – latest IDPF info

Ebook sales continue to rise – latest IDPF info

By Paul Biba  teleread.orgTrade Stats_09_03.jpgWell, it looks as if the rationale for TeleRead’s existence is still extant. Ebook sales are just continuing to increase. Here’s the info I got by email from Michael Smith of the IDPF this afternoon: Continue reading Ebook sales continue to rise – latest IDPF info

ePub vs. DRM: The Great Debate

A great debate between ePub and DRM is going on between Paul Biba and David Rothman at Teleread.  They both have posts supporting their arguments.  NSR will interview Paul Biba next week, so stayed tuned for more on this exciting discussion. Continue reading ePub vs. DRM: The Great Debate

IDPF Conference on eBooks

On May 11 – 12th the IDPF will hold its Digital Book 2009 Conference in NYC.  The theme is “an eBook Stimulus plan for Publishing.”  More information is available on the conference website.  Looks like there will be some sessions on DRM, ePUB, XML, and a presentation from Google on the Book Search program. Anyone attending?  If so, consider posting your comments here on the blog.

Digital Book 2009: An eBook Stimulus Plan for Publishing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Michael Smith Executive Director International Digital Publishing Forum 905-235-4373 msmith@idpf.org

Digital Book 2009: An eBook Stimulus Plan for Publishing

NYC Conference to focus on booming eBook business and winning commercial models

New York, NY April 06, 2009: The Association of American Publishers (AAP) reported last week that eBook sales represent the fastest growing segment of the industry while US book sales are in decline across all major book publishing markets.  To promote eBook commercial success for booksellers, publishers, authors, and distributors the International Digital Publishing Forum (www.IDPF.org) will host its annual spring educational seminar on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at the McGraw-Hill Auditorium in New York City.  Added to this fast-paced “best practices” conference will be a half-day workshop to be held on the afternoon of Monday, May 11, 2009.   Please see www.idpf.org/digitalbook09

Continue reading Digital Book 2009: An eBook Stimulus Plan for Publishing

eBooks I: Business Models and Strategies, OReilly TOC

The OReilly Tools of Change conference is underway in NYC, with many presentations and discussions about ebooks.  One that caught my eye was a panel discussion of eBook business models and strategies.  The presenters were:  Michael Smith (International Digital Publishing Forum), Kenneth Brooks (Cengage Learning), Leslie Hulse (HarperCollins Publishers), Cynthia Cleto (Springer Science+Business Media.  Cynthia Cleto was featured in the NSR audio interview in October, 2008.

The presentation demonstrates various drivers of ebook publishing, challenges, and patterns in user behavior that are driving the market to offer various business models.  It breaks down ebooks into the trade, higher ed, reference, and STM categories providing comparison charts on challenges, strategies, formats, etc.  I was happy to see catch phrases like – epub, DRM not necessary, and sales by the chapter, but unfortunately, they were not listed in each of the four categories.

eBooks II:  Formats, Standards, and Implementation, part two of the series on eBooks, discussed epub, but on the developer side of things.

November e-book sales up 108%

The rise of e-books: IDPF reports November e-book sales up 108 percent—and here’s some analysis
By Mark Coker, founder of Smashwords

image Mark Coker is founder of Smashwords and Dovetail Public Relations, as well as moderator of a February 10 panel at Tools of Change on “The Rise of E-Book.” See a San Jose Mercury News Q & A on Smashwords (a publisher for independent writers), which recently signed a Stanza-related distribution deal. – D.R.

The IDPF says e-book sales were up 108 percent for the month of November 2008 compared to the same period a year ago. The data is provided in conjunction with surveys conducted by the American Association of Publishers, and represents wholesale sales from only 13 U.S.-based e-book publishers, so total reported sales figures understate actual sales.

imageFor the first eleven months of 2008, e-book sales were up about 64 percent, according to the IDPF.

Dig beneath the surface, and the numbers are striking. E-book sales are surging while the entire trade book industry suffers a decline. Are print sales suffering at the hands of e-book sales? Unlikely. Something else is happening.

For the five years between 2002 and 2007 (click here for data; opens a PDF), overall trade book sales averaged an annual increase of 2.5 percent. That’s lower than inflation, which means unit sales probably decreased.

By contrast, e-books for the same period turned in a 55.7 percent average annualized increase in sales revenue.

Tiny base—but still an accelerating growth rate

Granted, the robust sales growth for e-books was off of a tiny base to begin with. But fast forward to October of 2008, the date for which year-to-date sales are reported on the AAP web site , and you see overall trade book sales for the first 9 months of the year were down 3.4 percent while e-book sales were up about 58 percent. So the rate of e-book sales accelerated during the first 9 months of 2008 compared to the previous five years.

More interesting, for the month of October the AAP reported overall trade book sales suffered a 20 percent drop in the year over year monthly comparison, while e-book sales accelerated to 73 percent growth.

Numbers for November and December aren’t yet published on the AAP site, though today’s numbers from the IDPF, which are supplied by the AAP, indicated that e-book sales have accelerated yet again, up 108 percent for November.

As any numbers guy or gal will tell you, it’s easy to show great sales growth when you’re growing off of a small base. But when sales show sequential acceleration off of sequentially increasing bases (meaning, you grow faster as you grow larger), then something really interesting is taking place.

If we conservatively estimate that overall trade sales for 2008 declined 3 percent, and e-books sales increased 70 percent, then wholesale e-book sales will rise to $114 million and overall trade book sales will decline to $24.21 billion. In other words, e-books will still only represent 1/2 of 1 percent of book industry sales, at least here in the US.

If you extrapolate the 70 percent growth for five more years (and I would argue that 70 percent is a relatively conservative number), then e-books rise to $1.6 billion, and assuming a 2 percent growth rate of the overall trade book sales to $26.7 billion (generous), e-books would then represent a respectable 6 percent of sales.

If you’re attending the Tools of Change conference February 9-11, I invite you to attend a panel I’m moderating entitled, “The Rise of E-Books,” where we’ll explore the past, present and future of e-books and try to understand the implications of these numbers for publishers and authors alike.

In the meantime, if you’re an author, you need to start exposing your books to the digital realm. Clearly, as the numbers above indicate, you should continue to publish in print because e-book sales will account for only a small percentage of your overall sales. In the years ahead, however, e-books will become an increasingly important format for book consumption.

Overdrive Promises more Content, Less DRM

From the TeleRead blog:
OverDrive: ‘Much more content without DRM’ promised for libraries in ‘09
By David Rothman

image Again and again I’ve asked the IDPF to please consider a logo for DRMless ePub books. OverDrive founder Steve Potash is also president of the IDPF, and recently he told Library Journal:

“OverDrive is the leader in bringing downloadable MP3 audiobooks to libraries. [It] is leading the library market in bringing all formats of digital media to readers—including much more content without DRM during 2009.”

I hope that includes copyrighted e-books, too, not just MP3. Like Steve, I’m keen on writers and publishers getting paid, and there are ways for this to happen without DRM. For now, I’ll regard the above statement as indicating at least some flexibility.

Meanwhile check out other comments in the LJ piece, headlined Apple’s DRM News said to have little effect on libraries for now.

(Thanks to Ed Klopek.)

eBook sales still on the rise

The IDPF reported a 43% increase in U.S. trade wholesale ebooks from June 2007 to June 2008.

June 2008 Sales = 11.6 million – still a small portion of total book publishing, but the number keeps rising.  That’s good news for we ebibliophiles!

Time to add that Kindle or Sony Reader to your holiday wish list!

EPUB Standard now on Sony Reader

From Publishers Weekly:

Sony Adopts EPUB Standard for Reader

By Jim Milliot — Publishers Weekly, 7/24/2008 7:16:00 AM

The International Digital Publishing Forum’s epub e-book standard received a big vote of support this morning when Sony announced that effective immediately its Sony Reader will now support the standard. Beginning in August, all new devices shipped will use epub, and right now owners of existing devices can go to http://esupport.sony.com to update their device’s software for epub support.

Brennan Mullin, v-p of Sony Audio, said the company was adopting the epub standard to encourage more vendors, booksellers and publishers to get involved in the e-book market and to broaden the amount of content that can be viewed on the Reader. The move to use epub is a significant change in approach for Sony, which has used its own standards and restricted consumers to buying e-books for the Reader from its own store. The use of epub will allow consumers to buy titles from a variety of outlets and will grow the number of titles compatible with the Reader to well passed the 45,000 now available through its online store. Another avenue for new material will be Adobe: Sony also annouced today that the device will support Adobe e-books with DRM and will also have the capability to reflow standard PDF e-books and other documents.

Publishers, who generally favor the one-format approach made possible by epub, welcomed Sony’s decision. “Sony’s support of epub is an important step forward in the cooperation of publishers and portable digital book manufacturers to create better experiences for readers,” said Brent Lewis, v-p digital & internet for Harlequin. “We’re thrilled with the upgrade.”  IDPF, of which Sony is a member, approved epub as an industrywide standard in an attempt to foster interoperability among e-book reading devices.

Mullin said sales of the Reader have been steady and that sales of titles have increased. Interest in e-books has grown and although reluctant to credit a competitor, Mullin acknowledged that the buzz around Amazon’s Kindle “has been good for everybody in the e-book market.” Amazon, however, has not adopted the epub standard.

In addition to adopting the epub standard, Sony has announced it has started offering the Reader in the U.K.