Tag Archives: Google Books

HathiTrust Digital Library, a major source of open scholarship with legal issues seemingly behind it

This week, we take a closer look at the HathiTrust Digital Library. This collection is likely the most oriented towards academic researchers, largely because it was the product of 13 universities that made up the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (renamed the Big Ten Academic Alliance last year) and the University of California.

The Trust began in 2008 as the result of the digitization of “orphan books,” which started in 2004 by the Google Books Library Project and now consists of a partnership of 60 research libraries located in Canada, Europe and the U.S. (See www.hathitrust.org/community). The University of Michigan currently provides the infrastructure on which the digital content resides. The collection includes 15 million volumes, of which about half are books. Of those 7.5 million books, 5.8 million are in the public domain. Continue reading HathiTrust Digital Library, a major source of open scholarship with legal issues seemingly behind it

Google Books prevails, lawsuit dismissed

Google Books prevails and the lawsuit is dismissed.

Quote from the Authors Guild v Google – Summary Judgment Decision (Case 1:05-cv-08136-DC Document 1088 Filed 11/14/13):

In my view, Google Books provides significant public benefits. It advances the progress of the arts and sciences,
while maintaining respectful consideration for the rights of authors and other creative individuals, and without adversely
impacting the rights of copyright holders. It has become an invaluable research tool that permits students, teachers,
librarians, and others to more efficiently identify and locate books. It has given scholars the ability, for the first time, to
conduct full-text searches of tens of millions of books. It preserves books, in particular out-of-print and old books that
have been forgotten in the bowels of libraries, and it gives them new life. It facilitates access to books for print-disabled and
remote or underserved populations. It generates new audiences and creates new sources of income for authors and publishers.
Indeed, all society benefits…       Denny Chin, U.S. Circuit Judge

See also:

Reuters – Google prevails over authors in book-scanning U.S. lawsuit

GigaOM – Google wins book-scanning case:  Judge finds fair-use, cites many benefits

Google eBook affiliates program launched

Reprinted in full from the Inside Google Books blog.

Retailers, bloggers, book publishers and other website owners in the U.S. can now become Google eBooks affiliates. Affiliates can link to Google eBooks on their sites for any of the hundreds of thousands of titles available for sale, earning a commission for referring sales to the Google eBookstore.

We launched the program as a limited beta in December with our first affiliate, Goodreads. Goodreads is a social reading site, who after becoming an affiliate was able to refer their avid book reading fans to the Google eBookstore. When Goodreads users buy a Google eBook, they’re gaining immediate access to their book and supporting Goodreads in the process.

Starting today, we invite all interested site owners to apply to join the expanded Google eBooks affiliate program. Participating sites gain new revenue streams by giving their book-reading audiences an easy way to buy Google eBooks. Continue reading Google eBook affiliates program launched

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

WorldCat Local adds new databases and ebook collections

DUBLIN, Ohio, May 31, 2011WorldCat Local, the OCLC discovery service that offers users integrated access to more than 800 million items in libraries around the world, has added more databases and collections from leading publishers and other information providers to make content more accessible to library users through the Web.

WorldCat Local offers access to books, journals and databases from a variety of international publishers and information providers; the digital collections of groups like HathiTrust, OAIster and Google Books; open access materials; and the collective resources of libraries worldwide through WorldCat.

With these latest additions, libraries using WorldCat Local can now offer users access to 1,400 databases and collections, and more than 500 million articles.

This month, OCLC added databases and collections to the WorldCat Local central index, including: Continue reading WorldCat Local adds new databases and ebook collections

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Articles of Interest

Apologies for the long list, I’ve been away for a week and lots has happened!

Ingram Announces New Library Ebook Access Model and Audiobook Shift

In the era of ebooks, what is a book worth (I)

Is signing with a mainstream publisher now a mistake?

Digital book subscriptions, by Jane Litte

Publishers Weekly: Librarians at the Gate

HathiTrust: A Research Library at Web Scale – from InfoDocket

Reflections on Google Book Search – The Scholarly Kitchen

AcademicPub Opens Custom Textbook-Building to Faculty …

California Bill Would Offer Clear Protection for Digital Reading Records

Six Reasons Google Books Failed by Robert Darnton | NYRBlog | The New York Review of Books

Nook Friends is a Shot Across the Bow of eBook Lending Sites – eBookNewser

Sixty Percent of iPad Owners Read eBooks on Their iPad – eBookNewser

Hands on With Sony’s S1, S2 Tablet PCs

News: No Room for Books – Inside Higher Ed

This Week in Libraries: Interview with Sarah Houghton-Jan about ebooks

OnCampus Research: “E-Books, E-Readers Begin to Catch on with College Crowd”

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

Articles of Interest

For the week of March 21st

Inkling: Another Digital Textbook Approacheth, But this time, It has Friends: The Scholarly Kitchen

Research Triangle Libraries Get $41K Grant To Explore Consortial Ebook Models

The Vexed Problem of Libraries, Publishers, and E-books ” The …

HarperCollinsGate: Some Thoughts ” The Scholarly Kitchen

Innovation and Longevity in Digital Publishing: Surfing the S Curve – The Scholarly Kitchen

Amazon Appstore for Android is open

E-book pricing hinges on customer perception of value

Google Books Settlement statements of: AAP, Open Book Alliance, Nat. Fed. of the Blind

Judge Rules Against Google Books Settlement

Google Books Settlement Rejected

The Google Books Settlement was rejected on Tuesday.  There has been a ton of press on this already.  Here are links to several key articles and documents:

PDF of Judge Denny Chin’s decision

The Google books settlement:  Where things stand and some suggestions for what’s next –  via The Scholarly Kitchen

Google Book Settlement Rejected:  Press Review, Comments and Resources – via INFODocket

Statements from the AAP, Open Book Alliance, and National Federation of the Blind – via TeleRead

Please Refine Your Search Terms – Higher Ed News


eBooks and Maritime History – see and hear it at ALAMW

Peter McCracken, librarian and founder of Serials Solutions, has a new hobby – ships.  His site, ShipIndex.org, helps people do research on hundreds of thousands of specific vessels. With over 1.5 million citations in it, the site tells you what books, journals, CD-ROMs, websites, databases, and other sources mention particular ships. It includes vessels mentioned in references sources like the Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History (a 2008 Dartmouth Award Winner), Naval Warfare: An International Encyclopedia, and others. It currently includes the contents from about 170 books, and whenever possible, it links to an electronic version of those books via Google Books. The team is working with several online reference publishers to incorporate links between their products, helping people discover references to ships in online databases, and helping people working in online databases to learn more about the ships mentioned there. Continue reading eBooks and Maritime History – see and hear it at ALAMW

Articles of Interest

Three misperceptions about the ebook business

Textbooks headed for ash heap of history?

A Student’s Stranded On A Desert Island … Tech Devices

Inside the Google Books Algorithm – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

iTunes U Introduces Free eBooks: Download Shakespeare’s Complete Works

Joe Wikert’s Publishing 2020 Blog: eBooks: Lending vs. Reselling

Forrester Research on future of ebooks: $3 billion by 2015

Will Your Local Library Lend E-Books? (Or Can They?)

Library eBooks on the iPad/iPhone, no Sync Required – Library Journal

Kindle Facts and Figures (history & specs)

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with the Publishers Association.

Reprinted in full from Library Journal, October 15, 2010. Francine, you go girl!

Dear Publishers,

We missed you, but, more importantly, you missed out on an opportunity to engage in discussion with a large market already invested in the future of ebooks. ­Library Journal and School Library Journal’s first virtual ebook summita daylong event on September 29focused on how public, academic, and school libraries are addressing digital books. It drew over 2100 registrants who stayed for an average of five and one-half hours. Over 238 libraries purchased site licenses so staff could come and go. At Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, the event drewand distractedthe entire leadership team from its regularly scheduled meeting. (The summit archive is still available online, until December 31, 2010, at www.ebook-summit.com.) Continue reading Publishers, please read this, particularly those of you involved with PA

Free online academic eBooks increases discovery, but not sales

An article in the Scholarly Kitchen blog summarizes a recent study done by Ronald Snijder of the Amsterdam University Press (AUP).  According to SK, “the study, appearing in the October issue of Learned Publishing, “The profits of free books: an experiment to measure the impact of open access publishing,” describes the results of an experiment in making online books freely available in Google Books and an institutional repository. ”

Clips from the original article, as found in the SK blog post –

  • “OA publishing enhances discovery and online consultation. Within the context of the experiment, no relation could be found between OA publishing and citation rates”
  • “Publishing as OA is still useful by making unaffordable books available [and yet] a sustainable business model cannot be exclusively build on extra sales generated from OA publishing”

Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Each Friday before the ALA Conference, the Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) gets together to have a program and discussion of issues surrounding reference publishing.  The ALA Annual meeting was no exception.  A large group of publishers and librarians gathered to figure out, “how did we get here?”  A panel of librarians, LIS instructors, reference contributors, and wholesalers, organized by Peter Tobey at Salem Press, presented some thoughts and challenges for reference content and reference publishing.  A summary of these comments is below.  The panelists included:  Buffy Hamilton, a teacher/librarian from Creekview H.S. in Canton, GA and blogger at The Unquiet Librarian and 1/4 blogger for Libraries and Transliteracy;  Sue Polanka (me);  Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean of the Madden Library, CSU – Fresno;  Bernadette Low, a frequent contributor to reference content from the Community College of Baltimore City;  William Taylor, Manager, Continuations iSelect (R) and Standing Orders at Ingram Content Group;  and Jessica Moyer, a doctoral candidate in literacy education at the U of Minnesota and instructor of a MLIS reference course. Continue reading Independent Reference Publishers Group (IRPG) Meeting Summary – ALA Conference

Articles of Interest

Some interesting articles and blog posts these past couple weeks on e-books.  The New Yorker article on the iPad, the Kindle and the future of e-books is particularly good.

Google Book Settlement Market Analysis Q&A – 4/22/2010 – Library Journal

The iPad, the Kindle, and the future of books: newyorker.com

More Texas school districts look at whether to switch to online textbooks

Librarians Discuss E-books During Seminar at London Book Fair « ResourceShelf

Key Findings from New Report: Scholarly Book Publishing Practice Report 2010 « ResourceShelf

Ebook sales up 176.6% in 2009 and passes audiobook sales

Can eBooks Save University Presses?

Faculty Survey Warns of Potential Irrelevance for Academic Libraries, Suggests New Roles – 4/8/2010 – Library Journal

Come On In: The New Improved Open Library!

Several universities to issue iPads to students

International Children’s Digital Library to release iPad app

If you’re a book reader, should you buy an iPad? / The Christian Science Monitor – CSMonitor.com

OCLC adding Google Books and HathiTrust records to WorldCat

Great news for eBook exposure!  In an effort to maximize the visibility and value of libraries’ full collections, OCLC is adding records to WorldCat that represent digitized books from the Google Books Library Project and the HathiTrust Digital Library to provide greater access to and increased visibility of these rich digitized collections.

OCLC is working with libraries, Google and the HathiTrust to derive new MARC records that represent these digital collections based on the rich collection of print records contributed to WorldCat by the OCLC membership over the last 40 years. Searchers will begin seeing these records in WorldCat immediately. OCLC will continue to add records for these collections to WorldCat on an ongoing basis.
Continue reading OCLC adding Google Books and HathiTrust records to WorldCat

New Articles of Interest

Wow, e-book talk has exploded.  There are so many good stories from the past week.  Have a look at some.

Tech Change: The library’s changing approach to ebooks and technology! By Tony Bandy

Some Thoughts on Free Textbooks

It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

The eBook Wars: Agency & Winners

Two studies on e-library economics

Hurtling Toward the Finish Line: Should the Google Books Settlement Be Approved?: California Digital Library

E-Library Economics – Inside Higher Ed

Electronic Frontier Foundation discusses digital books and your rights

iPad for Kids Coming from Mattel

Apple to wrap digital books in FairPlay copy protection [Clarified]

New Articles of Interest

SPIE launches digital library

Authors Guild responds to Justice Department’s comments

Department of Justice objects to revised Google Books settlement

Textbook companies to partner with ScrollMotion to put content on iPad

Macmillan’s Amazon Beatdown Proves Content Is King

Future of eReading might not be iPad, but Blio

Apple unveils iPad. Your move, Amazon

The iPad to Ruin the Book Publishing Industry?

Steve Jobs Reveals Apple’s eBook Pricing

The Future of the Book Market, Part 3: Publishers Content Providers

FT.com / Media – Walls close in on e-book garden

Revised Google Books settlement pleases few