Tag Archives: EBL

Charleston Program to feature plenty on eBooks

Anyone interested in eBooks should take a look at the Charleston Conference program, November 5 – 8th.  There are a plethora of sessions including:

Ebook use among a group of large academic libraries
To Supersede or Supplement? Profiling E-book aggregator collections
eBook Intelligence: The 8th Annual Health Sciences Lively Lunch
E-Books – How are they different/how are they the same as online journals?
Expanding the Ebooks Buying Experience: Approval Plans
Patron-driven Purchasing in Ebooks
Top Ten Things to unlearn about eBooks
Integrating Print and Digital Reference Resources
Student’s Perception of E-books: Survey Results and Discussion
electronic books into a UK University Library collection
The E-book Challenge: From Start to Finish, and Beyond
Bouncing, Viewing and Power Browsing: Understanding How Students REALLY Use Your E-books
Identifying and describing e-books: challenges facing publishers, librarians and their partners

I’m very excited to attend many of these sessions, particularly the one on patron driven purchasing – a great new business model offered by some aggregators.  EBL and NetLibrary are the two that come to mind.

Please excuse my personal plug here, but if you have an opinion on patron driven purchasing, stop by the Lively Lunch session Friday at Charleston.  Alice Crosetto (Univ. of Toledo) and I will debate traditional collection development with patron driven purchasing.  We may even have Michelle Harper from NetLibrary with us to describe this biz model better.  Friday – 12:50 – 2:00 “Tossing Traditional Collection Development Practices for Patron Initiated Purchasing:  A Debate.” Embassy Suites


Is anyone using eBooks?

Kari Paulson, President of EBL, offered these statistics at the Charleston Conference last fall. I verified them with her today. The stats are from EBL. Kari collected these anecdotal stats to respond to the common question, is anyone using eBooks?

At EBL, in the month of October, 2007
The average patron spent 32 minutes reading online, per title (does not include browse time)
16% of the sessions lasted over one hour
17.5 pages were accessed per session
50/50 split between downloading the titles and using the online reader

She also looked at the overall usage of library accounts who used EBL in both October 2006, and October 2007. Usage grew 464%. Granted, the libraries added additional titles throughout the year, but the increase in usage is still amazing.

I wonder how many of the pages got printed 😉