Tag Archives: Charleston Conference

Ask An Aggregator…. Would You?

If you had top executives from 4 academic eBook aggregators in the same room, what would you ask them?  Seriously, I need to know.  One of the Lively Lunch sessions at the XXX Annual Charleston Conference is an open forum with academic eBook aggregators from ebrary, EBL, Ingram, and NetLibrary.   I’m looking for suggestions on questions to ask these individuals.  I’m moderating and want to make this as informative and interesting as I can! Continue reading Ask An Aggregator…. Would You?

E-Everything: Putting it All Together, A Charleston Preconference

On Wednesday, November 3rd the 30th Annual Charleston Conference will begin with a series of pre-conferences.  One of them is called E-everything: Putting it All Together.  Details of the program and speakers are listed below.  If you are interested in attending, you can register online.

E-Everything: Putting it All Together
Electronic resources continue to flood the library marketplace at a staggering rate and there is no turning back now.  Libraries are making an effort to accommodate the influx of electronic content while budgets and staffing levels continue to diminish. Publishers are undergoing a paradigm shift, trying to maintain traditional publishing models while experimenting with born digital content.

This full day pre-conference will discuss the current state of electronic resources from both the library and publishing perspectives and offer insight into the E-Everything future. Some of the current issues that will be addressed include access, content integration, technology, and discoverability.  Presentations by librarians and vendors will update you, challenge your thinking, stimulate questions and generate discussion.  Attendees will gain knowledge of the market and get ideas for plugging into the latest and the greatest information technologies for electronic content. Continue reading E-Everything: Putting it All Together, A Charleston Preconference

Results of survey – interactive features in online reference products

Reposted from Booklist’s Points of Reference blog:

During the RBB webinar on June 1st, Power to the User, we discussed and demonstrated a variety of interactive features available in online reference products. At the end of the webinar, everyone had the opportunity to take a survey on these features. The survey listed over 30 interactive features and provided responses of no value, some value, high value, and neutral/no opinion. There were over 100 responses from 87% librarians/library media specialists, 6% library staff, and 2% each of library school students and publishers. There was a nearly even split between public and academic librarians (42% each) and 6% from school libraries. Id like to share some of these results with you. Continue reading Results of survey – interactive features in online reference products

Print on Demand and Open Access, A Booby Trap?

Interesting article in SSP”s Scholarly Kitchen by Joseph Espisito, “The POD Booby Trap and the Lure of Open Access Books.”  Espisito discusses “the booby trap” of open access, stating, “The unfortunate, unstated premise of those who fall into the POD booby trap is that they really don’t and can’t believe in the emerging primacy of digital text.  The trap is set for anyone who thinks that print is superior for enough readers to make print a long-term viable option.  This is highly doubtful.  E-books have already reached the tipping point.  In just a couple months, Apple has sold millions  of e-books from its online bookstore, millions that come on top of the tens of millions sold by Amazon for its Kindle and Stanza brands.  And Google Editions haven’t even launched yet.  No more make-believe.  If we want the cultural advantages of broad dissemination of scholarly texts through open access, then let’s step up and pay for it.  Authors, department heads, university provosts, granting agencies all of these have a stake, or claim to, in the distribution of academic material.  Let the stakeholders fund the stake.”

Let the stakeholders fund the stake.  This sounds exactly like a plan that Frances Pinter from Bloomsbury Academic is trying to promote.  She spoke about it at the O’Reilly TOC conference and I had a follow up interview with her in March.  She’ll be keynoting on this exact topic at The Charleston Conference in November.

CIBER Announces Results of Global Library Survey, Findings to Be Discussed at ALA Midwinter

From an ebrary press release:

Final survey report now freely available courtesy of Charleston Conference, YBP, and ebrary

December 21, 2009London, UKCIBER research group at University College London today announced the availability of the final report for its global library survey that concerns challenges, trends, and best practices during tough economic times. Co-sponsored by Charleston Conference, Baker & Taylor’s YBP Library Services, and ebrary®, a leading provider of digital content products and technologies, the survey was completed by 835 institutions around the world. Anyone may receive a complimentary copy of the final report by registering at http://www.ebrary.com/corp/inforequest/survey2009.jsp. Continue reading CIBER Announces Results of Global Library Survey, Findings to Be Discussed at ALA Midwinter

Patron Driven Purchasing Usage Study – Results Here

Jason Price and John McDonald from the Claremont University Libraries presented “Beguiled by Bananas: a retrospective study of the usage and breadth of patron vs. library acquired ebook collections” at the Charleston Conference this past November.  Some of the main points from the study were:

Are user-selected ebooks used less often than pre-selected ebooks?
No. User-selected ebooks are used ≈2-5x more often
Do user-selected ebooks have a narrower audience?
No. User-selected ebooks are used by ≈2-3x more unique users
Are user-selected collections less balanced by subject?
No.  User selected collections are similarly balanced.

The complete presentation, in pdf is here. If you’d like to see the notes, then click on this one instead.  Jason and John will also discuss their study in the Proceedings of the 29th Annual Charleston Conference.

Interactive Online Reference – Survey Results & Charleston Presentation

Last month I posted a link to a survey about interactive online reference features.  The survey was used to gauge the interest in 30 different interface features, ranging from video and sound to course packs, Web 2.0 features, and sharing materials.  The results of the survey were used during a presentation at the Charleston Conference on November 6, 2009.  The presentation was titled “Interactive Online Reference” and was presented by Tom Beyer from iFactory and myself.  The slides from our presentation are available here, and do include the results of the survey.  Overall, the respondents favored all 30 features, as everything received greater than 50% approval.  But, there were definite favorites, which are listed.  During our presentation, we used audience response systems to tally the interest of the attendees.  The results of those impromptu surveys are also included in the slides.

The January 2010 Booklist will include a summary of the presentation and survey in my Off The Shelf column (which I will post of course), and the full paper will be available in the 29th Annual Charleston Conference Proceedings sometime in 2010.   If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.

Sue

4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

Here is another blog post from Sylvia Miller, Director of “Publishing the Civil Rights Movement” at the University of North Carolina Press, summarizing a Charleston Conference presentation.  It is reprinted with permission.  (Thanks Sylvia, you are making my job easy!)

At the Charleston Conference, I attended an all-day preconference workshop on e-books organized by Sue Polanka of Wright State University (who runs the blog No Shelf Required), Carolyn Morris of Coutts Information Services, and Janet Fischer of Publishers Communication Group, Inc. I was especially impressed with the final talk of the day, given by Anh Bui of HighWire Press, Stanford University–probably because she said things that support the ideas in our Long Civil Rights Movement online pilot!
Continue reading 4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

The following summary of the Charleston Conference was written by Sylvia Miller from the University of North Carolina Press, and author of “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement” blog.  It is reposted with permission

Trains and battleships were two of the most telling metaphors that presenters at last week’s Charleston Conference used in their attempt to describe the strength, speed, and scariness of the changes currently taking place in academic librarianship and scholarly publishing.  The news media and press outlets that focus on education and publishing seem to regard 2009 as a tipping point for public acceptance and business success of e-books.   The speakers at this conference attended by 1,000 academic librarians and scholarly publishers clearly recognized that this enormous change is upon us.

In a talk entitled “I Hear the Train A Comin'”  Kevin Guthrie, President of Ithaka, asked, “When the tracks and the cars come up to everyone’s door, what happens to the beautiful old train station?”  He was of course referring to the impact of the Web on libraries, many of which may no longer be needed as physical repositories of content duplicated down the street, across town, and online.

Responding to this year’s conference theme “Necessity Is the Mother of Invention,” several speakers urged librarians to act quickly and strongly for positive change.   Ivy Anderson of the California Digital Library said that reorienting libraries toward the future was “like turning a battleship around.”  In an inspiring keynote speech, David Lankes of the Information Institute of Syracuse memorably referred to the dubious efficacy of “conducting exit interviews on the deck of the Titanic”!

Lankes urged librarians to recognize their mission “to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities” and become innovative, proactive leaders.  When I described the speech to a colleague here at UNC Press, she immediately said, “That could also apply to publishers!”  I told her that in fact the first audience member to comment during the Q&A session said exactly that.  In another plenary speech, Douglas Armato of the University of Minnesota Press concluded, speaking of libraries and publishers, “If we’re not dealing with this evolution together, we should be.”
Continue reading The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

More ebook preconference presentations – Discoverability and Visability

Charleston Conference – eBooks, Not just another binding preconference

Increasing the discoverability of ebooks means making sure they are easy to find when users are looking for them. Increasing the visibility means placing them in the user’s workflow even when they aren’t actively looking for them. Both initiatives are vital when placing books online. In this session we’ll discuss the issues surrounding the discoverability and visibility of ebooks, focusing on the academic, research, and clinical areas.

Anh Bui, Executive Publication Manager, Books Products, HighWire Press –Bui presentation

More ebook preconference presentations – eBook economics

Charleston Conference, eBooks, Not just another binding preconference

Session 4 — eBook Economics
Morgan & Claypool Publishers are famous for publishing high quality STM e-books without DRM.  As a new publisher, the company’s main focus is on ebooks rather than print.  The company’s cofounder, Mike Morgan, will speak about how this enables them to create works that can fill the needs of researchers, students and librarians in ways that traditional books cannot.

Mike Morgan, President and CoFounder, Morgan & Claypool –Morgan presentation
As the ebook has developed, so too has the business model.  Here, a variety of ebook business models will be examined, highlighting opportunities and challenges with each, and presenting creative business models for unique situations.

Cynthia Cleto, Global eProduct Manager, eBooks, Springer Science+Business Media – Cleto presentation

More ebook preconference presentations – eBook readers in libraries

Charleston Conference – eBooks, Not just another binding preconference
Session 3  – eBook Readers in Libraries

A plethora of ebook readers are coming to the market along with a wide variety of solutions for libraries to serve them. Marcus Woodburn will give an overview of the digital solutions currently available (and rumored) and a sense of how the publishing world is adapting to them in terms of pricing and rights.  Which books are they making available?  What are the limitations?  What changes can we expect?  He will also examine digital textbook solutions serving the academic population directly, but which should hold interest for the library community.

Marcus Woodburn, Director of Publisher Business Development, Ingram Content Group presentation

Digital content is a growing part of library collections. Librarians would like to offer patrons the ability to effectively access and download this content to e-Readers, allowing for portability and greater interaction with the text. But, this type of service poses challenges.   What readers are available? Can a device that was developed for the consumer market work in an institutional setting? How much money should be budgeted to try them?   What factors should be considered when purchasing e-Readers for patron use?  Anne Behler will share her real-world experience with establishing an e-Reader pilot project at Penn State, which involved partnering with Sony Electronics, Inc. to investigate the e-Reader’s place in an academic setting.

Anne Behler, Information Literacy Librarian, Penn State University presentation

More ebook preconference presentations – Workflow & Cataloging Issues

Charleston Conference – eBooks, Not just another binding preconference

Session 2 — eBooks and Libraries:  Workflow & Cataloging Issues

Implementing ebooks in a traditional print environment presents different challenges and opportunities.  Cataloging, workflow integration, content discovery, vendors and licensing agreements, budgeting, and patron driven acquisition issues will be discussed along with practical advice from librarians.

Lisa Sibert, University of California- Irvine –  Lisa Sibert part 1 Lisa Sibert part 2

Lindsey Schell, Bibliographer, University of Texas at Austin presentation

Supplier-provided MARC records-with-purchase have become the norm for aggregated ebooks as libraries cope with large title sets and limited resources.  While this appears to be an extension of the general trend toward shelfready new purchases and outsourced cataloging, the ebook model is not a parallel to the print paradigm.  Deb Silverman will discuss some of the issues that both libraries and vendors face as they try to integrate ebook records from vendors into their locally curated catalogs, and how the cataloging community is addressing some of these issues to insure that the catalog functions as an integrated effective discovery tool.
Deb Silverman, Manager of Technical Services, Coutts Information Systems presentation

Initial CIBER study results on library finances presented at Charleston Conference

Results of CIBER study on library finances, presented by Mark Kendall of YBP and Christopher Warnock of ebrary.

These notes were done on the fly, forgive any typos.

Demographics:

  • 589 responses
  • 71% academic libraries responded – most in north america (was Mexico in the NA grouping?), 55% USA
  • 87% members of consortium

Financial outlook

Charleston eBook Preconference – eBook standards session

Yesterday at the Charleston Conference we hosted a preconference on eBooks, titled “eBooks: Not just another binding.”  Carolyn Morris from Coutts, James Galbraith from OCLC, Janet Fischer from PCG Industries, and Sue Polanka from Wright State University organized the preconference.  There were 5 sessions on a variety of topics.  The discussion was great, questions were thought provoking, and feedback was excellent.  A great big thanks to all of our speakers for sharing their time and expertise.

The presentations from the sessions will be posted here on the NSR blog.  The first session was on eBook standards, presented by Emilie Delquie of PCG and Randy Petway of Publishing Technologies.  Their presentations are attached below.  Contact information for each speaker is in the slides.

Session 1 — eBook Standards

Our speakers will examine ebook standards from an industry and library perspective, specifically: What standards exist? What standards should exist? What librarians want in the way of ebook standards.

Emilie Delquie, Head of Research, Publishers Communication Group presentation

Randy Petway, Exec Vice President, Strategy & Business Development, Publishing Technology presentation

Last chance for Charleston eBook preconference

If you are headed to Charleston next week and have Wednesday free, please consider attending the preconference.  The full program is listed here. Summaries/highlights will be posted to the blog after the event.

EBOOKS:  NOT JUST ANOTHER BINDING
XXIX CHARLESTON CONFERENCE – ISSUES IN BOOK AND SERIAL ACQUISITION
CHARLESTON, SC, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2009:

eBooks are not just another binding. As with any new technology, librarians and publishers are discovering many challenges in implementing ebooks. This full day pre-conference will explore several of these challenges including: ebook standards, such as epub, DRM, interface features, and archiving; ebook readers and their use by aggregators and libraries; workflow issues in libraries like approval plans and catalog records; ebook economics including business models and transitioning from P to E; and the issues surrounding the discoverability and visibility of ebooks.
Continue reading Last chance for Charleston eBook preconference

Survey – online reference databases

NSR Readers,
I’m writing to ask for 10 minutes of your time to complete a survey about online reference databases.  I’m trying to gauge interest in a variety of features offered in online reference databases (think GVRL, Credo, SRO, ORO, ABC-CLIO, etc).  My results will be used in a presentation I am co-presenting at the Charleston Conference in a couple of weeks.  I’ll be co-presenting with Tom Beyer, the Director of Publishing at iFactory.  iFactory created Sage Reference Online, a variety of Oxford products, and more.  My part of the presentation takes Tom’s wild ideas and put them into perspective, hopefully using the data collected from this survey to determine if the features could work.

Thanks so much for your time and please feel free to forward this to your colleagues.  Results will be posted on the blog at a later date.
Sue

The survey:  http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=H0KH_2bkK7ZaeY1qWKZvzi8A_3d_3d

Librarians – CIBER Global Library Survey open through October 18th

Tish Wilson from ebrary just emailed me this press release:

CIBER Opens Global Library Survey in Conjunction with Charleston Conference, ebrary, and YBP
September 28, 2009 — London, UK — The CIBER research group at University College London (UCL) today invited all libraries to participate in an international survey examining challenges, trends, and best practices in tough economic times. Based on input from nearly 200 librarians worldwide, the questionnaire is now available and will remain open through October 18. Results of the survey, which is co-sponsored by Baker & Taylor’s YBP Library Services and ebrary®, a leading provider of digital content products and technologies, will be announced at the Charleston Conference, November 4-7 in Charleston, SC, USA. Continue reading Librarians – CIBER Global Library Survey open through October 18th

YBP and ebrary co-sponsor CIBER study on electronic resources challenges, trends, best practices

I received this press release today from ebrary.

YBP to Co-Sponsor CIBER’s Library Survey with ebrary, Results to be Announced at Charleston Conference

September 22, 2009 — Charlotte, NC –Baker & Taylor’s YBP Library Services today announced that it is co-sponsoring CIBER’s library survey with ebrary®, a leading provider of digital content products and technologies. Based on input from more than 170 librarians worldwide, the CIBER survey will examine electronic resources challenges, trends and best practices in tough economic times. The survey questionnaire will be available to all libraries later this month, and results will be announced at the Charleston Conference, November 4-7 in Charleston, SC. Continue reading YBP and ebrary co-sponsor CIBER study on electronic resources challenges, trends, best practices

Charleston Conference – eBook preconference program

Here is an update on the eBook preconference planned for the Charleston Conference on November 4th.

Time: 9 am – 4 pm

eBooks: Not Just Another Binding

Cost: $125

Speakers: Lisa Sibert, Electronic Resources Acquisitions Librarian, The UC Irvine Libraries; Lindsey Schell, University of Texas – Austin, Anne Behler, Information Literacy Librarian, Penn State University; Cynthia Cleto, Global eProduct Manager, eBooks, Springer Science+Business Media, eProduct Management+Innovation; Mike Morgan, President and CoFounder, Morgan Claypool; Emilie Delique and Randy Petway, Publishers Communication Group, Rich Rosy, Ingram Digital, Anh Bui, Highwire Press.

eBooks are not just another binding. As with any new technology, librarians and publishers are discovering many challenges in implementing eBooks. This full day pre-conference will explore several of these challenges including: eBook standards, including epub, DRM, interface features, and archiving; eBook readers and their use by aggregators and libraries; workflow issues in libraries like approval plans, catalog records; eBook economics including business models and transitioning from P to E; and the issues surrounding discoverability and visibility of eBooks..