Tag Archives: Charleston Conference

Negotiating with vendors, 91% of librarians do not have a documented process

Last week at the Charleston Conference, Matt Dunie, President of Data-Planet, presented with colleagues Carl Grant and Mike Gruenberg in a session entitled, “Secrets in Vendor Negotiations.”  In preparation for this event, Matt sent a short survey (11 questions) to librarians to inquire about their preparations before vendor negotiations.

Highlights of the survey:

E-Everything: Putting It All Together

The November, 2011 issue of Against the Grain focuses on the e-everything future.  Edited by Audrey Powers from the University of South Florida, the issue discusses e-content procurement, access models and technology, content integration, first sale doctrine, and much more. It’s a great line-up of contributors and topics.  The table of contents should be posted on their site very soon here:  http://www.against-the-grain.com/toc/

Many of the contributors were also part of the E-Everything pre-conference during the Charleston Conference in early November.  Archived versions of the pre-conference presentation will be available on Against the Grain and Libraries Thriving sites.

ebrary’s 2011 Global Student E-book Survey results

ebrary is announcing the availability of  the 2011 Global Student E-book Survey.  Full results (downloadable) will be available in January.  Those of you attending the Charleston Conference next week can get a sneak peek at the results during a session on Friday (details below).  Here is more from the press release:

ebrary Surveys Suggest Students’ Research Needs Unmet, Results to be Presented at Charleston

November 1, 2011 – Palo Alto, CA, USA – In an ongoing effort to better understand the research requirements and expectations of students, especially as they relate to books, ebrary® today announced the initial results of its 2011 Global Student E-book Survey.  A comparison of the new survey with the same survey conducted in 2008 implies that aggregators, publishers, and librarians need to better collaborate to address students’ information and research needs. Continue reading ebrary’s 2011 Global Student E-book Survey results

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

Interview with IGI Global CEO & President, Dr. Mehdi Khosrow-Pour

Last week, while at the Charleston Conference, I had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, CEO and President of IGI Global.  We discussed the history of IGI Global, current eBook offerings, and future plans for eBooks.  The discussion always seemed to come back to the basic philosophy of IGI Global – to disseminate knowledge, and allow the end user to determine the format of that knowledge, be in print, electronic, or both.

For more information on IGI Global, visit their website at www.igi-global.com or send email to Mehdi at mehdi@igi-global.com.

This interview and over 25 others are available on the NSR interviews page.

Textbooks: It’s about economics and selection, not format

Great article on The Scholarly Kitchen blog by Kent Anderson, who is questioning a recent survey on student preference of print textbooks.  A clip from the blog post:

Anderson says, “The survey is drawing the wrong conclusion by framing the question in terms of media choice. It’s not about print versus electronic. It’s about economics and selection.

Imagine if someone asked you if you wanted to pay more for something and have limited selection. Would you trade a cheaper format with a broader selection for something you’d calculate as more costly and less abundant? Only if you’re a devoted early adopter.

For the vast majority of students, print textbooks are economically superior to e-books simply because there’s a robust used book market for expensive print textbooks. Buy them new, sell them back. Want them cheaper? Buy them used. The market is much more favorable and robust.”  end clip

Later in the post, Anderson states, “As an aside, I have yet to find this survey released in any form other than a press release. That’s not a good sign. It makes me think the whole thing was about generating the press release.” I’ll add to Anderson’s speculation by repeating something I heard at the Charleston Conference last week.  Can you really trust surveys that boast student’s reliance on the print book which are sponsored by college bookstores?

Charleston Conference – eBook Archiving

Yesterday, I joined a panel of publishers, aggregators, and archiving agencies to discuss the issue of eBook archiving.  I had to set the stage for libraries, which was quite easy – we are in fear of losing our content to which we no longer have control of since it is housed on someone else’s server in another part of the country/world.  How do we guarantee that the content we purchased will remain accessible to us and our end users? We need to work on a solution….and fast.

Rebecca Seger from Oxford University Press presented the publishers perspective, highlighting things OUP has done, and challenges facing publishers.

  • OUP has journals archiving in place with portico, CLOCKSS, and LOCKSS.  OUP’s first trigger event happened in 2009.  Their policy is publicly available on the OUP site.
  • Ebook archiving at OUP is done via publisher archiving and a dark archive.  They keep a repository in PDF format.  But, OUP cannot archive the proprietary versions created by the aggregator partners like ebrary, EBL, Ingram, EBSCO.
  • OUP feels the obligation to preserve the Oxford Scholarship Online version for library customers.  They also offer the option of providing XML data to purchaser for local archiving (as she described was being done at OhioLINK.)
  • Some challenges:  Archiving options are limited for ebooks as not everything available for journals is available for ebooks, yet.  Additionally, defining the trigger events has proven to be much more difficult. Continue reading Charleston Conference – eBook Archiving

Charleston Conference – Funding of Open Access Books

Dr. Frances Pinter, Publisher, Bloomsbury Academic presented a new business model for the efficient and effective funding of open access “books.” (Frances presented this at the TOC conference and had an interview with me about the topic earlier in 2010 if you’d like more details.)

Dr. Pinter described her background in publishing and the focus of Bloomsbury Academic on open access publishing.

What does the academic community still want from publishers?  independent verification of quality, typesetting/editing, variety of formats, etc.  Frances also adds the “Mother-in-law” factor too, every academic wants a print copy of their magnum opus to present to their mother-in-law.

How are publishers responding?  experimentation, becoming service providers rather than gatekeepers, becoming co-creators of value

Frances compared the open access model to ice cream, stating:

Charleston Conference – Open Textbooks Model & Library Involvement

Jeff Shelstad, Founder and CEO of FlatWorld Knowledge spoke first.

Jeff provided some stats on higher education:

  • 19.1 million students in 2010 in college
  • $850 avg spent on textbook
  • so, it’s about a 10billion industry
  • Cengage, Pearson, McGraw-Hill are the big 3 publishers along with many other small ones

Problem is that the industry has outworn their value proposition and is not willing to pay for the product the industry is offering.  Affordability is a huge problem.

36% of community college student in a study said that the cost of textbooks had caused them to leave/dropout Continue reading Charleston Conference – Open Textbooks Model & Library Involvement

Charleston Conference – Semantic Technology

Darrell Gunter, CEO of Gunter Media Group, Adam Marshall of Portland Press and Thane Kerner of Silver Chair presented on semantic technology and getting up to speed to better serve your user community.

Each of the speakers posed 5 Questions with 5 Answers

What prompted you to engage semantic technology into your products/applications?

  • Darrell Gunter (for Elsevier/Collexis) Needed to develop an expert profile database where the experts can connect with one another
  • Adam Marshall: So much data that we no longer know what we know and finding what we find is very difficult.  Most of the articles we keep are PDF, which are flat files with no interactivity, and they wanted to develop a new tool to provide interactivity b/t PDFs. Came up with Utopia Documents, which blends the best of the semantic web in PDFs.  It connects documents with online data, linking the flat PDF to online databases.
  • Thane Kerner: they have large volumes of very specialized content and needed better ways to search and connect content that wasn’t available in current search technology Continue reading Charleston Conference – Semantic Technology

Charleston Conference – Mobile Reference Apps

Casper Grathwohl from Oxford University Press and Kassidy Lackey from Handmark spoke about mobile applications for reference tools.  Casper provided examples of several vendor-based apps like Gale’s AccessMyLibrary, university library mobile apps, and some apps designed for OUP.  OUP has 85 apps, which cover a variety of reference subjects.  These are marketed mostly to the consumer and OUP reports close to 1 million in application revenue, which is only a small part of their complete revenue.  Casper was surprised to see that libraries and publishers are not yet working together on mobile apps but felt that the opportunities are available, particularly in the area of discovery since both parties have a vested interest in seeing use of the content. Continue reading Charleston Conference – Mobile Reference Apps

Charleston Conference, eBook Access Models and Technology

Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Digital Services Librarian at Southern Connecticut State University, spoke about access models for eBooks, specifically with mobile devices and dedicated eReaders. Lisa spoke about barriers to access stating that restrictive DRM, licensing, and incompatible formats are all barriers to accessibility of eBooks.  Additionally, devices all have different loading options. Librarians have to understand DRM, formats, and compatibility between devices in order to assist their patrons.

Lisa suggested we visit the M-Libraries site, where librarians are sharing their knowledge about ebooks and mobile access.  She also recommended a post from Stephen’s Lighthouse where he lists several sites that compare eBook readers. Continue reading Charleston Conference, eBook Access Models and Technology

Charleston Conference – Discoverability and Efficiency

Anh Bui, Executive Publication Manager, Books Products, at HighWire Press presented, “discoverability and efficiency: how users get to content they value.”  She quoted Clay Shirky, It’s really not information overload, it’s filter failure (Clay Shirky, 2008).  Ann stated that information filters can be used/activated by users or they can be used/activated by us (librarians/publishers).

An acronym HighWire uses:  SOIR, socialization, openness, integration, repurposing

They’ve discovered your content.  Now What? Continue reading Charleston Conference – Discoverability and Efficiency

Charleston Conference – E-Content Integration

Michael Gorrell, Sr. VP and CIO of EBSCO, discussed several challenges that EBSCO (and other publishers/vendors) are experiencing while integrating content. Some of these challenges include:

  • licensing content from a diverse set of sources
  • processing heterogeneous content homogenously
  • searching everything with precision and breadth at the same time
  • displaying different data so that their uniqueness can be evident

EBSCO’s approach to processing content is to start with database design (bibliographic) and determine which fields the data supports, how the end user will search the data, and what transformations are necessary for display and searching.  When possible, they provide editorial expertise by indexing and adding their own metadata, using controlled vocabulary. They also run their own search engine which allows them to take advantage of the unique data in library records and use it to influence the relevancy of results.  When displaying multiple content types they want to make sure to highlight the individual features of each format.   Continue reading Charleston Conference – E-Content Integration

Charleston Conference – E-Content Procurement

Cory Tucker, Head of Collection Development from UNLV and Emilie Delquie, VP of Publishers Communication Group provided an overview of the variety of ways in which electronic content is being procured in libraries.  Cory discussed several current driving factors for procurement including decreasing library budgets, the variety of business models available, and network level access and discovery of content.

Emilie provided several statistical charts to show the shift of ARL expenditures from print to electronic (estimated 80% on electronic by 2020).  She borrowed her slides from James Michalko at OCLC.   Continue reading Charleston Conference – E-Content Procurement

Off to Charleston

The XXX Annual Charleston Conference gets underway on Wednesday with a variety of Pre-conferences.  One of which is E-everything, a full day discussion of eBooks, eJournals, multimedia, and how to best acquire, access, and deliver to libraries and end users.  In addition to the pre-conferences, there are no less than 30 sessions about eBooks.  I’ll be blogging from whichever sessions I attend, so come join the conference virtually with me.

And, it’s your last chance to send me any questions for my Ask An Aggregator session and offer input on eBook archiving. Hope to hear from you.

Now, off to find some shrimp and grits in Charleston!

ebrary’s PDA Model is Finally Live

ebrary announced today the launch of the much awaited patron driven acquisition model.  It’s been a couple of years in the making, received considerable testing, and was grown from librarian demand and suggestions.  A brief history:

ALAMW Conference, 2009.  ebrary hosted a session to discuss patron driven acquisitions and many librarians were there to offer suggestions.

January, 2010, the PDA pilot testing is extended while ebrary conducts additional surveys.

October, 2010 – The ebrary PDA model is Live!

The key features of the PDA model, from the ebrary press release include: Continue reading ebrary’s PDA Model is Finally Live

Archiving eBooks, librarians are you concerned?

What if your eBook aggregator or perhaps the publisher with whom you now own over 5,000 eBook titles went belly up next week?  What if OCLC and EBSCO never purchased NetLibrary, where would your titles have gone?  Perhaps the 100 titles you’ve bought for your personal Kindle are no good when the device disappears due to newer technology. Are you concerned about accessing the eBook content you’ve purchased in perpetuity?  Is the lack of eBook archiving preventing you from purchasing eBooks? Are Portico, LOCKSS, or CLOCKS suitable solutions for archiving eBooks?  I’m looking for your opinions and concerns on eBook archiving for a Charleston Conference presentation on this very topic.  Please leave your comments or send me a direct email at sue.polanka at wright.edu

Thanks!

Charleston Conference Program big on eBooks

The XXX Annual Charleston Conference, held in Charleston, S.C. November 3 – 6th, has just released it’s tentative program.  It’s loaded with discussions, papers, and panel presentations on e-books, patron driven acquisition, digital textbooks, and more.  I’ve listed a few of the sessions below, but for a closer look, check out the full program.  Early bird registration ends October 1st.

Wednesday, Nov. 3rd – Full Day Preconference – E-Everything: Putting It All Together (additional cost to attend)

THURS Lively Lunch 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM  Digital Warfare: Navigating the E-book Minefield Continue reading Charleston Conference Program big on eBooks

Librarian Speaks up about eBooks

James Mouw, assistant director for technical and electronic resources and the electronic resources officer at the University of Chicago Library, was interviewed for an article in the Chronicle this week.  The article, E-Books: What a Librarian Wants, discusses simultaneous release, DRM, perpetual access, and workflow issues.  James will be speaking at the Charleston Conference in November during the E-Everything preconference.  He will be one of the presenters discussing electronic content integration.