Tag Archives: Barnes & Noble

What’s the best way to get indies into libraries?

Has one of your library patrons ever asked why your library had a Kindle bestseller title in print but not as an ebook? Maybe someone who preferred reading e rather than p? Or have you ever wondered the same thing, yourself, when you found an ebook you wanted to read but then found that your collection development people had missed it, or that they had trouble adding it to your collection?

In an earlier article in this column on indies in libraries we looked at indie authors whose ebooks have become bestsellers and discussed why libraries would want to add these to their collections. To summarize what we found, while libraries focus their acquisitions efforts on books from the Big Five, there is a parallel universe of publishing that generates bestsellers and sells them to the public. Some of these bestsellers get into library collections, but not all. The issue for libraries is acquiring as many of these bestsellers as possible to minimize their loss of patrons to Amazon and other ebook services that provide instant access to the titles.

These books are not the old-fashioned self-published books with bad covers and typographical errors that many library and publishing professionals still think of when thinking of independent authors and independent publishing; rather, these are professionally written, edited and produced books (mostly genre fiction) that have been published by highly skilled writers who take advantage of the new realities of publishing. They purchase the editorial and design services of publishing professionals through marketplaces, such as Reedsy, where they can contract for services from editors and others who are current or former employees of the Big Five. They publish and distribute their books on platforms, such as Amazon, that are built to drive sales for them. And they market their books through book blogs, store appearances, and direct email services, such as BookBub.

In this article, we will look at the practical aspects of adding indie ebooks to a library collection, how indie authors distribute their ebooks, and the channels that libraries can use to add these books to their collections. Continue reading What’s the best way to get indies into libraries?

Choosing Ebook Platforms for K-12 Libraries

This is the third in a series of  articles on ebook  models in K-12 or school libraries. The first article was about why school librarians would want to know about anything as abstract as an ebook business model (hint: knowing the basic models will help you choose the best products to meet your library’s goals). The second article examined the four basic models and boiled them down to their simplest levels. One treats ebooks like printed books. One treats ebooks like journal articles. One treats ebooks like books in a bookstore. One treats ebooks like shared resources. Today’s article will show how to use these basic concepts to select the best kinds of ebook products for your library.

Some issues to keep in mind

Before going further, let’s look at some of the issues that come with ebooks in school libraries. We want to have these in mind as we consider how to create a combination of products with different ebook business models. These issues involve three areas: the supplier’s platform and business model, assuring that the ebooks are used to support the educational goals of the school, and bridging the digital divide.

To begin with the platform and business model issues, we need to understand what an ebook platform is, and why it is important. We already know what a business model is and how the four kinds of business models affect school libraries. The platform is the specific technology that an ebook supplier uses to provide ebooks. It includes a web-based interface for student use. It may include apps that make the books readable on mobile devices. It will have an administrative interface or dashboard for you to use so you can control loan periods, track usage, etc. It may also have a teacher interface so that teachers can assign reading to students, and then monitor their progress. If you need to select and purchase individual ebooks before your students can read them, it will also include a book ordering function. In other words, the platform supports everything you, your students and your teachers do with ebooks. Without the platform, you cannot use the ebooks. Continue reading Choosing Ebook Platforms for K-12 Libraries

Nook and OverDrive partner to provide digital magazines and newspapers to libraries

From the OverDrive blog:

NOOK Media, a subsidiary of Barnes & Noble, Inc. (NYSE: BKS), and OverDrive, the leading eBook platform for libraries, today announced a new partnership to enable public libraries to provide readers with access to hundreds of the most popular digital magazines and newspapers from the NOOK Newsstand®. Utilizing OverDrive platforms integrated with library catalogs, library patrons in the U.S. and U.K. will be able to discover, access and read a huge selection of NOOK Newsstand titles on their NOOK tablet device and on tablets, smartphones and PCs via the suite of Free NOOK Reading Appsâ„¢. The new service is expected to roll out to customers in the coming months. Continue reading Nook and OverDrive partner to provide digital magazines and newspapers to libraries

Amazon, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble, Google Books remove in-app purchasing from iOS apps

Apple’s new in-app selling rules are in effect, requiring retailers to give Apple 30% of revenues from book sales.  As a result, Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Google Books have stopped selling books through their apps.  SONY’s app was rejected back in February for the same reasons.  There’s lots of news coverage, a few are linked below:

Kindle, Nook & Kobo Apple Apps No Longer Sell eBooks – GalleyCat

Amazon caves to Apple, drops Kindle’s in-app button – Computerworld

Sidestepping Apple: From Amazon to Condé, Companies Rethink Their App Strategies | Epicenter | Wired.com

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

Articles of Interest

Archiving the Web for Scholars – (Internet Archive) Inside Higher Ed

Barnes & Noble to launch next-generation Nook May 24th | TeleRead

News: Picking a Fight – (Amazon and College Book Stores) Inside Higher Ed

Petition against HarperCollins ebook/library policy garners 53,786 signatures | TeleRead

Ereaders fail at education

UK publishers and libraries in talks over e-book lending | TeleRead

Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session

On Tuesday, May 3rd I recorded a 15 minute segment for the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education on Think TV, the local public television station in Dayton, Ohio.  My topic was the rise of digital textbooks and options available for students and faculty to access and produce textbooks and learning materials.  Below is a snapshot of my general comments with links to various sources for more information.

Our current textbook system is broken.  We have arrived at $200 textbooks and have students who cannot afford them.  As a result, students try to borrow a textbook from the library or a friend (sometimes the older edition), purchase a used one, or go without.  Neither of these options provides revenue to the publisher, thus resulting in higher price points in an effort to recover the costs or production.   What can we do about this catch 22? Continue reading Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session

Amazon Pulls Plug on Lendle.me

Reprinted in full from PAFA.net – http://www.pafa.net/archives/3129

Lendle.me, one of the new and very popular ebook lending services, was shut down today. Amazon has pulled the plug on them. The API that connects them to the Amazon database has been revoked. According the a@lendleapp tweet, Amazon said Lendle doesn’t “serve the principal purpose of driving sales of products and services on the Amazon site.” Other lending sites have also had their API pulled according to this statement from Lendle. Continue reading Amazon Pulls Plug on Lendle.me

Articles of Interest

McGraw-Hill’s iPad-enhanced ebooks by Inkling

Could the Kindle be free by the end of the year?

Barnes & Noble claims 25% of US e-book market share

David Rothman promotes the National Digital Library on the Chronicle of Higher Education

Go To Hellman: HarperCollins and the Suspension of eBook …

Podcast: The Future of the Textbook, as Seen by Publishers

How to turn the Nook Color into a fully-functional Android tablet

Can You Actually “Sell” an E-Book? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Shh! eBooks and the Quiet Conspiracy against Public Libraries

Exclusive: Kno Student Tablet Start-Up in Talks to Sell Off Tablet Part of Its Business

Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

Springer, who has existing eRetail partnerships with Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble, and others, announced this week the addition of the Google eBookstore for Springer eBook titles.

From their press release:  Springer eBooks can now also be purchased via Google’s eBookstore. Google currently holds the biggest collection of Springer eBooks with more than 52,000 books, which is a combination of physically scanned books published prior to 2006 and PDF file submissions since 2006. Springer adds 4,000 newly published titles per year.

Springer eBooks are also available on Amazon for the Kindle, and in the near future Barnes & Noble for the NookStudy.com platform, Kobo Books, B&T BLIO, Entourage and Apple’s iBooks, which is now receiving books in the free and open ebook format ePub. Springer will soon also deliver books in ePub format to Amazon for the Kindle. Continue reading Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

Opening the eBook Market

Reprinted in full from One Librarian’s Perspective, by Tim Kambitsch, Director of the Dayton Metro Library.

It is fashionable to declared Digital Rights Management (DRM) dead. And maybe in the world of music it is. For eBooks in the library marketplace, however, DRM is alive and well. The book publishers who may be more conservative than the music industry in trying to protect their intellectual property are willing to stymie sales in electronic formats to maximize their sense of security.

In the ideal open-yet-market-driven eBook environment there won’t be DRM, but regardless of whether DRM lives on, the closed vertically integrated world of eBooks sales to libraries presents a bigger problem; it is that environment that needs to change. For libraries to both offer electronic collections and maintain their role of building collections for the long term we need a layered environment where the purchase of materials is separated from the where those purchased materials are hosted. Further, library patrons deserve distinct choices for the programs and devices they use for readings. Continue reading Opening the eBook Market

Lend Me Your eBooks – by Erik Christopher

My friend and colleague, Erik Christopher (@eBookNoir), recently wrote a two part article on lending eBooks for Publishing Perspectives.  Cleverly titled, “Friends Romans, Librarians:  Lend Me Your eBooks” (parts 1 and 2), Christopher discusses lending issues with Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and OverDrive.

Friends, Romans, Librarians: Lend Me Your E-book (Part 1)

Friends, Romans, Librarians: Lend Me Your E-books (Part 2)

Articles of Interest

Top 10 Articles of 2010 – Digital Book World

Amazon Kindle E-Reader Sales Will Keep Growing in 2011: 10 Reasons Why – Mobile and Wireless – News & Reviews – eWeek.com

Predictions for 2011 from Smashwords Founder – GalleyCat

How to add books to the iPad, iPhone, etc.

Check Out Library Books Using Your Phone – eBookNewser

David Thornburg on Open-Source Textbooks | Edutopia

Almost One-Third of Internet Users Plan to Buy a Kindle

Feeding Your E-book Habit: Borrowing From the Library The …

Year One: The Born Digital Publisher – The Scholarly Kitchen

Go To Hellman: 2010 Summary: Libraries are Still Screwed

How to find free Kindle books

NOOK ereaders become biggest seller in B&N’s history

People will pay for digital content says Pew Internet & American Life Project

IDATE releases ebook report

Prediction for 2011 – The Individual Rules – The Scholarly Kitchen

Steve Haber: The Changing Role of Libraries in the Digital Age

Articles of Interest

Why E-Textbooks Just Make Sense: An Academic and a Literary Agent Explain

Holiday Gift Guide To eReaders – eBookNewser

OER 101: Theory and Practice (Open Educational Resources)

NOOKcolor: Hands-On Review and Thoughts for the Future

Marred by Shelving | ALA TechSource (Lending eBooks)

Barnes & Noble opens first Spanish language digital bookstore in the US

Dedicated ereaders the choice of heavy readers, says BSIG study

As Textbooks Go Digital, Campus Bookstores May Go Bookless – Technology

Home – Kindles at The Unquiet Library – LibGuides at Creekview High School

Maine Libraries Adopt eBook Program – eBookNewser

One World Publishing – Scholarly Kitchen

Copia Debuts Social Reading Platform, Kills $99 E-Reader

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

Articles of Interest

Ebook restrictions leave libraries facing virtual lockout

The End of the Textbook as We Know It – Technology

SLJ Leadership Summit 2010: Librarians and Ereaders

New Barnes & Noble children’s e-book program hints at color touchscreen Nook

An Amazon Digital Book Rental Plan? – Inside Higher Ed

Source: New Nook is Android-based, full-color – CNET News

Save on textbooks Actions for Students – Student PIRGs

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Articles of Interest

Hot reads this week.  Here’s a list of some good ones:

New from Bowker: Selection of Statistics from Consumer-Focused Research Report for Book Industry « ResourceShelf

The digital era has not made publishers defunct

Kobo Now Supports ePub and PDF files

Google Book Search beneficial to publishing industry, study shows

The ABC’s of E-Reading – Wall Street Journal

Virginia State University Business School Buys E-textbooks for Students

Ebook market share at B&N tops their print book share

BISG Study – 7% of eBook downloads are from a library

The Book Industry Study Group, along with a variety of corporate sponsors, launched a study in late 2009 about consumer attitudes toward e-book reading.  Consumers were asked a series of questions in Nov. 2009, Jan. 2010 and again in July 2010.  Some initial results were released during a twitter #followreader discussion hosted by O’Reilly TOC.  The following is an excerpt from the TOC post:  (note that “library” is reported for 7% of ebook downloads) (after original post found out that Kelly from BISG said that library downloads are so much in their infancy they don’t have a large enough sample.  They hope to do a survey soon regarding this.) Continue reading BISG Study – 7% of eBook downloads are from a library