Tag Archives: Apple

Ingram to provide publishers with access to Apple’s iBookstore

Ingram announced that it will provide publisher content to Apple’s new iBookstore.  Using their CoreSource® program, Ingram’s solution for the storage, management, and distribution of digital content, publishers will be able to submit eBooks to iBookstore for availability on Apple’s new iPad.  Ingram will help manage the relationship between publishers and Apple.  This will enable a publisher’s catalog to be ingested, converted into ePub, Apple’s required format, and submitted to the iBookstore.   To learn more about Ingram’s Apple Referral Program and CoreSource, visit: www.ingramcontent.com/apple.

New Articles of Interest

I’m way behind on posting links to articles I’ve bookmarked in delicious.  There’s been so much activity in the industry these last few weeks that I can’t keep up.  So, here is a long list of things I’ve found from the past month.

Amazon Ups the Anti in eBook Price Wars; Rumors Say Apple is Shaky on iPad Content for Launch

Focusing on WorldCat, OCLC Sells NetLibrary to EBSCO, Thins FirstSearch – 3/17/2010 – Library Journal

Another publisher discovers free e-books lead to greater sales

Results for Read an EBook Week 2010 by Rita Toews

Ebooks as a textbook saver: can it work for some students?

The Case for Textbooks | American Libraries Magazine Continue reading New Articles of Interest

10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Earlier this week I attended the O’Reilly Tools of Change (TOC) Conference for the first time.  Over 1250 attendees gathered in New York City to discuss and network   about issues and trends in publishing, in particular, digital publishing.  While much of the information presented was for the publishing industry, I did manage to find several great ideas and concepts that relate to libraries.  I’d like to share these with you, in no apparent order. Continue reading 10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

TOC – Lessons Learned from the Failure of Ebooks in 2000

Tools of Change – Lessons Learned from the Failure of Ebooks in 2000, and What They Mean to the Future of Electronic Publishing – Feb. 23

Michael Mace, Rubicon Consulting – mike@rubiconconsulting.com

Don’t fall in love with the way you do business today because that will change.

Mike’s Agenda:

Tools of Change – Selling in Mobile Markets (tips for apps)

Selling in Mobile Markets – Rana Sobhany, VP Marketing at Medialits in NYC  (rana.sobhany@gmail.com)

TOC Conference – Monday Feb. 22nd, 9 – 12:30

I came to this session after the morning break, so I missed the first 90 minutes.  Rana was a great speaker – lots of stories, examples, and practical information – no death by powerpoint!  The notes below are from the last hour of the presentation, which focused on building applications. While this presentation was directed to publishers, the information is pertinent for libraries too.  We surely won’t spend $50K to develop an app, nor charge anyone to download, but the marketing, measuring, and testing are all relevant.  The very last bullet point is critical for libraries wanting to develop mobile apps. Continue reading Tools of Change – Selling in Mobile Markets (tips for apps)

New Articles of Interest

Wow, e-book talk has exploded.  There are so many good stories from the past week.  Have a look at some.

Tech Change: The library’s changing approach to ebooks and technology! By Tony Bandy

Some Thoughts on Free Textbooks

It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

The eBook Wars: Agency & Winners

Two studies on e-library economics

Hurtling Toward the Finish Line: Should the Google Books Settlement Be Approved?: California Digital Library

E-Library Economics – Inside Higher Ed

Electronic Frontier Foundation discusses digital books and your rights

iPad for Kids Coming from Mattel

Apple to wrap digital books in FairPlay copy protection [Clarified]

New Articles of Interest

SPIE launches digital library

Authors Guild responds to Justice Department’s comments

Department of Justice objects to revised Google Books settlement

Textbook companies to partner with ScrollMotion to put content on iPad

Macmillan’s Amazon Beatdown Proves Content Is King

Future of eReading might not be iPad, but Blio

Apple unveils iPad. Your move, Amazon

The iPad to Ruin the Book Publishing Industry?

Steve Jobs Reveals Apple’s eBook Pricing

The Future of the Book Market, Part 3: Publishers Content Providers

FT.com / Media – Walls close in on e-book garden

Revised Google Books settlement pleases few

New Articles of Interest

Apple is Up to Something Publishers May Not Like

Erik Christopher follows up on “The strange case of academic libraries and e-books nobody reads”

Elsevier Introduces New Features For Online Health-Science Textbooks – Wired News – CHE

Four Universities Settle Suit over Accessibility to Kindle for the Blind – 1/28/2010 – Library Journal

Apple’s new $499-and-up iPad includes NY Times, Bookstore

Ebooks and Higher Ed – Platforms, an overview from inside, Part 2 by Erik Christopher

The new iPad, it sounds like a dream date

Been watching the twits about the iPad – “extraordinary,”  “a dream to type on,” “much more intimate than a laptop,” “the best browsing experience you’ve ever had.”  Sounds like they are describing a dream date (sans the laptop and browsing). Oh wait, now they are talking about pinching folders, ouch.

Seriously – it appears to be a bigger and better iPod Touch.  Multimedia viewing, full keyboard, pictures, email, ebooks, music, google maps, existing apps, yadda yadda.  I’m sure I’ll own one soon, but it doesn’t sound like they’ve introduced anything we haven’t seen in other devices – it will just be better of course because it’s Apple.

Not too much on ebooks thus far and nothing on textbooks.  Anxious to find out more about that.

added later – just read a nice post on teleread about the ebook options on the new ipad.   iBooks – EPUB…this really is a dream date!

ebook devices – a resource guide

Attended a virtual conference today, “The Handheld Librarian.”  There were two presentations on ebooks, one related to Kindles in libraries and the other on ebook devices.  The latter, presented by Charlotte Johnson of Southern Illinois University, highlighted the resourceful LibGuide she has developed on ebook reading devices.  It is available from the SIU Edwardsville site.  She has a section for each major device including Sony Reader, Kindle, Apple iTouch/iPhone, Plastic Logic, iRex, and Augmented Reality.

New articles of interest

These articles are all linked on the NSR home page in the delicious links.

Espresso Book Machines: Lurch winning friends at Northshire Bookstore—whats next?

Michael Nielsen ” Is scientific publishing about to be disrupted?

The e-book wars: Google vs. Amazon vs. Apple—and how they may duke it out

Springer leaps ahead in academic e-book market

Arizona State Sued Over Kindle E-Textbook Usage – 7/2/2009 – Library Journal

FTC Digital Rights Management town hall meeting: summing up

From Teleread, author not listed:

FTC Digital Rights Management town hall meeting: summing up

Posted: 26 Mar 2009 09:39 AM PDT

I have had a day to think about what I saw at the FTC’s town hall meeting on Digital Rights Management yesterday, and what it might mean for the future of DRM. The conference fell into the classic “good news, bad news” scenario.

Unrealistic Expectations

The good news is that the FTC is now more aware than ever of the difficulties to consumers implicit in Digital Rights Management (especially since they received over 800 public comments, which they admitted during the meeting they had not managed to work all the way through yet). The bad news is that it is not the FTC’s brief to adjudicate matters relating to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and fair use, or even anti-trust concerns relating to non-interoperable DRM.

The FTC is chiefly concerned with unfair and deceptive business practices. (For example, in the other big FTC story of the day, the FTC announced yesterday it was suing Dish Network for making telemarketing calls to people listed on the national Do Not Call Registry.)

If companies make deceptive statements in advertising about the limitations of their DRM, the FTC will look into it. If companies release DRM that harms the consumer (as in the infamous Sony rootkit debacle), they will investigate and possibly sanction. But they can’t do anything to let you copy DVDs to your video iPod when the DMCA forbids it. Talk to Congress about that.

That being said, the meeting was of great interest just for the open discussion of DRM among big guns from both consumer-advocacy and commercial trade groups. Anyone who did not realize DRM was a contentious issue before would certainly have gotten an earful.

Potential Remedies

Though some speakers were not terribly exciting (one read a ten-minute prepared statement in a sleep-inducing monotone; another rambled on at length about a “thought experiment” involving taking a bus full of developing-country representatives to a shopping mall that made no sense either during or after the speech), most of them had good points to make, pro or con.

Several potential DRM remedies were discussed, including

  • a logo-based disclosure system like ESRB or MPAA ratings so consumers would be able to see at a glance what DRM was on a product
  • making DRM systems more interoperable, or adding “exception handling” so DRM would permit more fair uses
  • DRM-using companies depositing keys and source code in escrow so that if they went bankrupt consumers would be able to crack the DRM and have access to the media they paid for afterward.

These took on a character of “pie in the sky,” however, given that imposing such solutions is generally outside the FTC’s brief. For example, making DRM more interoperable would be difficult given that companies generally have a vested interest in making sure their DRM works for them alone. (Apple’s stranglehold on the digital music industry due to its Fairplay DRM was brought up more than once.)

The FTC Takes Questions

One of the more interesting panels to me was the very last, in which representatives of the FTC got in the hot seat to field questions and comments as to what they might actually do about DRM. The answer: as stated above, not a whole lot.

Nonetheless, the first question fielded was one that I emailed, and I was even mentioned by both real name and moniker. (I had asked that TeleRead be mentioned as the source, but they forgot.) I pointed out that Amazon owned the Mobipocket e-book format, currently used by many of its e-book competitors, and asked what the FTC would be willing to do if they decided to stop licensing that format.

The FTC panel replied that they could not address specific what-if scenarios, but they could talk about similar investigations they had done in the past. They talked about their investigation into Microsoft when Microsoft wanted to get out of the music business and shut down its DRM servers—meaning that consumers would no longer be able to play the music they had bought from Microsoft. They closed the investigation after Microsoft agreed to keep its servers turned on.

All in all, the FTC town hall meeting was an interesting event, and worthwhile in that it fostered public discussion and debate about DRM that might end up educating more people about its disadvantages. But those who expected any solid commitments will be left disappointed.

Other Coverage

Here is a roundup of other articles I have found covering the town hall meeting.

Oren’s Weblog has excellent panel-by-panel summaries of the event (though Oren did not chronicle the sixth panel, in which the FTC answered questions about what measures it might take):

Content Agenda looks at the meeting here; the Copyright and Technology blog has coverage here. Brad’s Reader looks at some implications for e-books here. Here is a PDF article laying out a system of logo-based disclosure of DRM on download products of the sort that was proposed at the meeting.

Ars Technica also has an article summing up the first few panels that came before the lunch break.

Once and Future e-book

The Once and Future e-book: On Reading in the Digital Age
A veteran of a former turning of the e-book wheel looks at the past, present, and future of reading books on things that are not books. -by John Siracusa, Apple Technology Specialist at Ars Technica.

John writes about the history of ebook devices, corporate mis-steps, outmoded business models, DRM, and the market vibe.   Technologically minded librarians will empathize with his frustrations.  Those who aren’t can get a quick background of the way tech, business, and customer interests interact and conflict.  Publishers will recognize the plea for new business models.  The post suggests that an immediate change in attutude and practice is needed or publisher’s will lose the moment’s opportunities.

Overdrive Promises more Content, Less DRM

From the TeleRead blog:
OverDrive: ‘Much more content without DRM’ promised for libraries in ‘09
By David Rothman

image Again and again I’ve asked the IDPF to please consider a logo for DRMless ePub books. OverDrive founder Steve Potash is also president of the IDPF, and recently he told Library Journal:

“OverDrive is the leader in bringing downloadable MP3 audiobooks to libraries. [It] is leading the library market in bringing all formats of digital media to readers—including much more content without DRM during 2009.”

I hope that includes copyrighted e-books, too, not just MP3. Like Steve, I’m keen on writers and publishers getting paid, and there are ways for this to happen without DRM. For now, I’ll regard the above statement as indicating at least some flexibility.

Meanwhile check out other comments in the LJ piece, headlined Apple’s DRM News said to have little effect on libraries for now.

(Thanks to Ed Klopek.)