Tag Archives: Amazon

TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Summary of Tools of Change session, reprinted in full from Teleread.com by Paul Biba

Bill Godfrey (Elsevier), Rich Rothstein (HarperCollins Publishers), Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly Media, Inc.)Moderated by: Abe Murray (Google, Inc. )

Savikas: first foray in 1987. Stared with cd books and online books in 2001, which was first substantial digital presence. Wish is that Amazon would adopt epub as their standard. Digital is now about a decade for O’Reilly, and one of the biggest changes is that there are many more markets for digital products. Can’t imaging what it will be like in 10 years. Book will not go away – neither the package nor the long form narrative type of content. There will be a whole new category of new media that probably can’t be called books any more. Over the last 100 years more and more layers built up between publishers and consumers and web is bringing us back to a more direct relationship. In his experience the interest in enhanced ebooks seems to come from the publishers more than it does from the reader. Now that books can know that they are being read this can lead to enhanced opportunities. Databases are prime examples for turning into enhanced books. Not convinced that advertising will be as much of the future of newspapers and magazines it has been in the passed. Newspapers have lost the monopoly of being a source of local information. There is what value and need for what newspapers provide, but the package is obsolete. Publishers should be taking a stronger role in advocating with the retailers and device makers. Big piece of the epub 3 revision is to support dynamic delivery to different devices. Continue reading TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Opening the eBook Market

Reprinted in full from One Librarian’s Perspective, by Tim Kambitsch, Director of the Dayton Metro Library.

It is fashionable to declared Digital Rights Management (DRM) dead. And maybe in the world of music it is. For eBooks in the library marketplace, however, DRM is alive and well. The book publishers who may be more conservative than the music industry in trying to protect their intellectual property are willing to stymie sales in electronic formats to maximize their sense of security.

In the ideal open-yet-market-driven eBook environment there won’t be DRM, but regardless of whether DRM lives on, the closed vertically integrated world of eBooks sales to libraries presents a bigger problem; it is that environment that needs to change. For libraries to both offer electronic collections and maintain their role of building collections for the long term we need a layered environment where the purchase of materials is separated from the where those purchased materials are hosted. Further, library patrons deserve distinct choices for the programs and devices they use for readings. Continue reading Opening the eBook Market

Why Amazon will never work with libraries

Very interesting blog post at ireaderreview.com on why Amazon will never work with libraries.  The blog is not an official Kindle site, and the writer is portraying his views from a big business perspective, so keep this in mind before you shoot through the roof with anger, librarians.  The comments are colorful as well, and worth a look.   Let’s say this IS true, and Amazon will never work with libraries.  Does this change your attitude toward loaning Kindles and buying content from Amazon to support the Kindles?  If nook, SONY, Kobo, and others are better suited for library content, would you rather buy, loan and promote these devices in your library? I would.

Lend Me Your eBooks – by Erik Christopher

My friend and colleague, Erik Christopher (@eBookNoir), recently wrote a two part article on lending eBooks for Publishing Perspectives.  Cleverly titled, “Friends Romans, Librarians:  Lend Me Your eBooks” (parts 1 and 2), Christopher discusses lending issues with Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and OverDrive.

Friends, Romans, Librarians: Lend Me Your E-book (Part 1)

Friends, Romans, Librarians: Lend Me Your E-books (Part 2)

“Books at JSTOR”

Last week I posted a very brief announcement about JSTOR and eBooks.  I’ve since been emailed this more thorough press release.

January 11, 2011 – New York, NY – Five of the nation’s leading university presses – Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale – are at the forefront of a new effort to publish scholarly books online as part of the non-profit service JSTOR.  Their books, representing ground-breaking scholarship across the humanistic, social, and scientific disciplines, are expected to be available in 2012. Continue reading “Books at JSTOR”

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

Articles of Interest

Ebook restrictions leave libraries facing virtual lockout

The End of the Textbook as We Know It – Technology

SLJ Leadership Summit 2010: Librarians and Ereaders

New Barnes & Noble children’s e-book program hints at color touchscreen Nook

An Amazon Digital Book Rental Plan? – Inside Higher Ed

Source: New Nook is Android-based, full-color – CNET News

Save on textbooks Actions for Students – Student PIRGs

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

Articles of Interest

I missed this last Friday, sorry for the long list.

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

UK Publishers Association sets out restrictions on ebook lending – stupid!

Specter of e-book piracy looms large on horizon

If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of Us | Digital Book World

How five e-readers stacked up – USA Today

In Digital Age, Students Still Cling to Paper Textbooks

The Thinking LMS (Learning Management System) – Inside Higher Ed

Kindles at high school bring praise, surprises – one month of use at Clearwater High School

6 things I would do today if I were a bookstore owner waiting for Google Editions

Honey, I Shrunk the E-Book: Amazon Slicing “Singles” for Kindle

Libertary: new book reading site

Amazon has 76% of e-book market, survey reports

Kindles, Sony & Nook e-Readers Allowing Libraries To Thrive In Information Age?

CUNY to launch Entourage Edge pilot program

As Textbooks Go Digital, Will Professors Build Their Own Books? – Technology

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion | PCMag.com