Tag Archives: Amazon

TOC – Lessons Learned from the Failure of Ebooks in 2000

Tools of Change – Lessons Learned from the Failure of Ebooks in 2000, and What They Mean to the Future of Electronic Publishing – Feb. 23

Michael Mace, Rubicon Consulting – mike@rubiconconsulting.com

Don’t fall in love with the way you do business today because that will change.

Mike’s Agenda:

eBook Wars – a live podcast this Wednesday

**Note, this was recorded**  info below.  This Wednesday, Feb. 10th from 2PM – 3PM EST, Copyright Clearance Center’s Chris Kenneally will be hosting a special Beyond the Book live podcast (http://beyondthebookcast.com/live-webcast/) examining the eBook Wars, which are taking shape with MacMillan challenging Amazon and the rise of eReaders and the iPad. During the podcast, Chris and his panelists will look at all sides of the e-book story and what future battles may bring to the print and digital marketplace. The podcast will air live on BlogTalkRadio: http://bit.ly/drJipN

Joining Chris are:

·         Andrew Albanese, features editor at Publishers Weekly;

·         Sara Nelson, Books Editor, “O” Magazine;

·         Brian O’Leary, Founder & Principal, Magellan Media Partners; and

·         Mike Shatzkin, Founder & CEO, The Idea Logical Company, Inc.,

During the podcast, Chris will also be taking phone calls at 646-378-1949.

Yes it was recorded, you can listen here:http://beyondthebookcast.com/from-the-frontlines-of-the-ebook-wars/

New Articles of Interest

SPIE launches digital library

Authors Guild responds to Justice Department’s comments

Department of Justice objects to revised Google Books settlement

Textbook companies to partner with ScrollMotion to put content on iPad

Macmillan’s Amazon Beatdown Proves Content Is King

Future of eReading might not be iPad, but Blio

Apple unveils iPad. Your move, Amazon

The iPad to Ruin the Book Publishing Industry?

Steve Jobs Reveals Apple’s eBook Pricing

The Future of the Book Market, Part 3: Publishers Content Providers

FT.com / Media – Walls close in on e-book garden

Revised Google Books settlement pleases few

Amazon buys touch screen start up company

Article in the NYTimes today about Amazon purchasing the start up company, Touchco, based in NY.  Touchco’s touch screen technology is cheaper than the iPad/iPhone technology and is said to recognize an unlimited number of simultaneous  touch points.  Looks like Amazon is drawing the big guns.  Rumor has it they have finally open up the Kindle to development for applications – about time.   I’m thrilled with all of these new devices and technologies.  First generation readers just didn’t do anything for my taste, so I’m very excited to see how the device of the future unfolds.

New Articles of Interest

Wow, lots of good stuff going on these last couple of weeks.

Forty-nine percent of surveyed consumers unlikely to buy dedicated e-book readers

Before E-book Experimentation, How About A Little Back to Basics?

Ebooks and Higher Ed – Platforms, an overview from inside by Erik Christopher

How to: The archaic art of printing e-books from home

Amazon Opens Kindle to App Developers

Open Book Alliance Calls for Scrapping Google Settlement, with Public Guardian – 1/19/2010 – Library Journal

ALA 2010 Midwinter Meeting: Top Tech Trends Panel Focuses on End Users and Ebooks – 1/19/2010 – Library Journal

Amazon Annouces new 70% Royalty Option for Kindle Publishing

Woman’s Day to Launch Digital ‘Cookvook’

The Making of an eBook: Part 1

New Articles of Interest

eBook and Audiobook Download Websites for Libraries See Record Growth in 2009 — OverDrive

“Blindness Organizations And ASU Settle Amazon Kindle DX Discrimination Suit” By Robin Wauters

TBI Research claims Amazon currently sells 90% of all e-books

The Kindle vs. the Nook

Mortgaging the future of universities the e-book package way

think | The Digital Divide (Kindle project at Case Western)

Survey on Scholarly Book Publishing Practice

The Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers conducted a survey of academic book publishers policies and practices in online publishing in 2009.  The initial results of that survey are available (released in Oct. 09) with additional results to follow.  More information can be found on the ALPSP site.

From the ALPSP site:  The First Findings Summary (pdf) published on 13 October  2009 draws attention to:

* the size and extent of the forthcoming survey;
* the types of academic publishing currently being undertaken;
* the reported effect on sales of the ‘Look Inside’ function provided by Amazon;
* the number of publishers so far signed up to the Google Book Settlement;
* the proportion of eBooks published by commercial as against non-profit publishers.

Adobe eBook Platform Webinar

I attended the Adobe eBook Platform webinar today.  Some notes and thoughts are below:

Dave Dickson, Product Manager, was the primary speaker

Publishers want to produce eBooks in a single file format, but consumers want to purchase the eBook in the format of their choice

Adobe’s role – to be an enabler.  Publishers author in either pdf or epub, use adobe’s content server 4 (pdf,epub) and deliver in either adobe digital editions or the reader mobile software for multiple devices. Continue reading Adobe eBook Platform Webinar

Comments on Google Book Search Settlement Coming to a Head (Again)

Ah, it is the beginning of September when thoughts turn to going back to school, the days turn a little colder (in the northern hemisphere) and the smell of lawsuit briefs is in the air. Well, okay — the latter might not be what you expect, but this is a special September, after all. Postponed from MayL1, the deadline for filing comments in the Google Book Search settlement is coming up. And everyone is weighing in (”again” for some) on the details of the settlement. A couple of highlights.

The American Library Association (ALA), the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL)L2 again offered its support for the settlement, if only the court would promise to extend vigorous oversight of pricing and privacy practices of Google and the Books Rights Registry. This came in the form of a supplemental filingL3 to the briefL4 the three organizations filed in MayL5 (just prior to the first comment deadline). Continue reading Comments on Google Book Search Settlement Coming to a Head (Again)

The Google Book Scanning Project: Issues and Updates – EDUCAUSE Webinar Summary

Sat in on the EDUCAUSE webinar on the Google Book scanning project.  The speakers were

Jonathan Band
Counsel, Library Copyright Alliance
Dan Clancy
Engineering Director, Google Book Search Continue reading The Google Book Scanning Project: Issues and Updates – EDUCAUSE Webinar Summary

Sony Cuts eBook Prices to $9.99

NYTimes article on Sony cutting eBook prices from 11.99 to 9.99.This is my favorite section:  “Regarding the price cut for digital books, Mr. Haber said: “We have to offer value. It’s clear e-books should be less expensive than regular books, with the savings on printing and logistics getting passed on to the consumer.”and this is the worrisome part:  “Book publishers will still retain their traditional cut of every e-book sale — about half the hardcover retail list price. But they are concerned that as online retailers like Amazon and Sony gain market power, they will eventually tire of losing money on e-book sales and ask publishers for lower wholesale prices, a move that would cut into their profit margins.”   To me this says less publishers and more publishing control by Amazon and Sony.  Toss Google in that mix and we’ve got ourselves quite a trifecta.

Nicolas Baker on the Kindle

Nicolas Baker, famous within libraries for Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper (2001),  has written an article about the Kindle for the New Yorker.  Not much surprising, general kvetching: the Kindle doesn’t work well with images, text to speach is not an audiobook, not every book is available, etc.  but I think it is interesting to see ebooks capturing such a large part of the popular culture’s attention.

The only part I think Mr. Baker missed the mark was in the reader chat forum.  A reader asks:

“Do you see e-readers, including the Kindle or even iPod, playing any role in libraries? Or perhaps can you foresee libraries having a role in providing content to such devices? Librarians have played a huge role in my reading life and I’m not ready to cede that role over to Amazon or bn.com at the moment.”

In his response, Mr. Baker mentions print on demand machines and then adds, “but if all books become electronic, the task of big research libraries remains the same—keep what’s published in the form in which it appeared.”

Library = warehouse

New articles of interest

Articles linked from my delicious account this week include:

University Presses Stepping Up e-Book Efforts – 7/17/2009 1:56:00 PM – Publishers Weekly

Barnes & Noble partners with Plastic Logic; Opens up; Targets Kindle

Amazon Charts Course Toward E-Book Advertising

Release E ahead of P? Might be the future, says pub guru Mike Shatzkin

Giving away free books online helps academic sales

U.K.’s Blackwell to distribute 185,000 Ingram e-titles via Blackwell platform

Book insurance—to try to guarantee you can read your DRMed e-books in the future?

E vs. P price debate: Sourcebooks delays e-book version of potential bestseller

Amazon releases sheet music for the Kindle

UM to sell digitized books on Amazon

First Google, now Amazon, UM has certainly got connections.  They announced this week a plan to offer book reprints for sale on Amazon as reprints on demand.  According to their press release,”The University of Michigan will make thousands of books that are no longer in copyright — including rare and one-of-a-kind titles — available as reprints on demand under a new agreement with BookSurge, part of the Amazon.com group of companies.  The agreement gives the public a unique opportunity to buy reprints of a wide range of titles in the U-M Library for as little as a few dollars. As individual copies are sold on Amazon.com, BookSurge will print and bind the books in soft-cover form.” Continue reading UM to sell digitized books on Amazon

Amazon yanks content

Is this fuel for the anti DRM fire or what?

Teleread.org – You really DON’T own your Amazon ebooks

Posted: 17 Jul 2009 06:43 AM PDT

Got this email from John Hagewood and it just had to be shared with you:

Weirdness in Kindle-land:

this morning I got an email from Amazon saying:

We’re writing to confirm that we have processed your refund for
$0.99 for the above-referenced order.

The total refund amount will be credited to your credit card in
3-5 business days.

The following is the breakdown of your refund:
Animal Farm by George Orwell. Published by MobileReference (mobi)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Continue reading Amazon yanks content

New articles of interest

These articles are all linked on the NSR home page in the delicious links.

Espresso Book Machines: Lurch winning friends at Northshire Bookstore—whats next?

Michael Nielsen ” Is scientific publishing about to be disrupted?

The e-book wars: Google vs. Amazon vs. Apple—and how they may duke it out

Springer leaps ahead in academic e-book market

Arizona State Sued Over Kindle E-Textbook Usage – 7/2/2009 – Library Journal

New articles of interest

I’ve bookmarked the following articles relating to eBooks on my delicious account.  These are displayed on the NSR homepage as well.

BYU Using the Kindle for ILL

Hotdog, someone has started a much needed plan to get eBooks part of the ILL program.  According to a 6/10/09 LJ article, BYU Library has a pilot program wth 3 Kindles.  They are  circulating these kindles with a variety of very new titles, too new for ILL.  Verbal permission was given from Amazon, nothing in writing.  Highly recommended to speak with Amazon before you delve into loaning out Kindles.  Check out the article for more details.

E-textbooks not ready for college students yet?

From Teleread   By David Rothman

image 6 Lessons One Campus Learned about E-Textbooks is the headline over Jeffrey R. Young’s article in the Chronicle of Higher Education. But perhaps it should read instead, “E-textbooks not ready for college students yet, at least in many cases.”

Northwestern Missouri State University used the Sony Reader in a pilot study and, according to Young, found that students demanded printed books instead because of navigation problems with E.

Mind you, this wasn’t with the new PRS-700, which lets you use a stylus to move around. So maybe the results would have been different. Continue reading E-textbooks not ready for college students yet?

Is it possible to donate an eBook to the library?

Roger Sperberg wrote an interesting piece, “How to give away an ebook after you’ve read it” in the Teleread blog.  He discusses the idea of patrons purchasing an ebook to read for themselves and donating it to the library when they are finished.  Roger states, “If I buy an ebook of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, then it’s glued to me. Love it or hate it, I can’t give it to the library for others to read. So why doesn’t the library set up a program for donors: “Buy it in our name and we’ll lend it to you first.” Continue reading Is it possible to donate an eBook to the library?