Tag Archives: Amazon

Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

Springer, who has existing eRetail partnerships with Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble, and others, announced this week the addition of the Google eBookstore for Springer eBook titles.

From their press release:  Springer eBooks can now also be purchased via Google’s eBookstore. Google currently holds the biggest collection of Springer eBooks with more than 52,000 books, which is a combination of physically scanned books published prior to 2006 and PDF file submissions since 2006. Springer adds 4,000 newly published titles per year.

Springer eBooks are also available on Amazon for the Kindle, and in the near future Barnes & Noble for the NookStudy.com platform, Kobo Books, B&T BLIO, Entourage and Apple’s iBooks, which is now receiving books in the free and open ebook format ePub. Springer will soon also deliver books in ePub format to Amazon for the Kindle. Continue reading Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Summary of Tools of Change session, reprinted in full from Teleread.com by Paul Biba

Bill Godfrey (Elsevier), Rich Rothstein (HarperCollins Publishers), Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly Media, Inc.)Moderated by: Abe Murray (Google, Inc. )

Savikas: first foray in 1987. Stared with cd books and online books in 2001, which was first substantial digital presence. Wish is that Amazon would adopt epub as their standard. Digital is now about a decade for O’Reilly, and one of the biggest changes is that there are many more markets for digital products. Can’t imaging what it will be like in 10 years. Book will not go away – neither the package nor the long form narrative type of content. There will be a whole new category of new media that probably can’t be called books any more. Over the last 100 years more and more layers built up between publishers and consumers and web is bringing us back to a more direct relationship. In his experience the interest in enhanced ebooks seems to come from the publishers more than it does from the reader. Now that books can know that they are being read this can lead to enhanced opportunities. Databases are prime examples for turning into enhanced books. Not convinced that advertising will be as much of the future of newspapers and magazines it has been in the passed. Newspapers have lost the monopoly of being a source of local information. There is what value and need for what newspapers provide, but the package is obsolete. Publishers should be taking a stronger role in advocating with the retailers and device makers. Big piece of the epub 3 revision is to support dynamic delivery to different devices. Continue reading TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Opening the eBook Market

Reprinted in full from One Librarian’s Perspective, by Tim Kambitsch, Director of the Dayton Metro Library.

It is fashionable to declared Digital Rights Management (DRM) dead. And maybe in the world of music it is. For eBooks in the library marketplace, however, DRM is alive and well. The book publishers who may be more conservative than the music industry in trying to protect their intellectual property are willing to stymie sales in electronic formats to maximize their sense of security.

In the ideal open-yet-market-driven eBook environment there won’t be DRM, but regardless of whether DRM lives on, the closed vertically integrated world of eBooks sales to libraries presents a bigger problem; it is that environment that needs to change. For libraries to both offer electronic collections and maintain their role of building collections for the long term we need a layered environment where the purchase of materials is separated from the where those purchased materials are hosted. Further, library patrons deserve distinct choices for the programs and devices they use for readings. Continue reading Opening the eBook Market

Why Amazon will never work with libraries

Very interesting blog post at ireaderreview.com on why Amazon will never work with libraries.  The blog is not an official Kindle site, and the writer is portraying his views from a big business perspective, so keep this in mind before you shoot through the roof with anger, librarians.  The comments are colorful as well, and worth a look.   Let’s say this IS true, and Amazon will never work with libraries.  Does this change your attitude toward loaning Kindles and buying content from Amazon to support the Kindles?  If nook, SONY, Kobo, and others are better suited for library content, would you rather buy, loan and promote these devices in your library? I would.

Lend Me Your eBooks – by Erik Christopher

My friend and colleague, Erik Christopher (@eBookNoir), recently wrote a two part article on lending eBooks for Publishing Perspectives.  Cleverly titled, “Friends Romans, Librarians:  Lend Me Your eBooks” (parts 1 and 2), Christopher discusses lending issues with Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and OverDrive.

Friends, Romans, Librarians: Lend Me Your E-book (Part 1)

Friends, Romans, Librarians: Lend Me Your E-books (Part 2)

“Books at JSTOR”

Last week I posted a very brief announcement about JSTOR and eBooks.  I’ve since been emailed this more thorough press release.

January 11, 2011 – New York, NY – Five of the nation’s leading university presses – Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale – are at the forefront of a new effort to publish scholarly books online as part of the non-profit service JSTOR.  Their books, representing ground-breaking scholarship across the humanistic, social, and scientific disciplines, are expected to be available in 2012. Continue reading “Books at JSTOR”

Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

I attended this fabulous and informative session during the Charleston Conference on building an eReader collection by Aisha Harvey, Nancy Gibbs, and Natalie Sommerville of Duke University Libraries.  I wanted to run my notes past the presenters first, to ensure accuracy, thus the tardiness of this post.

First and foremost, according to the librarians, the eReader lending program is a team approach and impacts every aspect of the way we build collections in libraries – access, selection, cataloging, ref, circ, etc.

Aisha Harvey, head of collections spoke first and provided an overview of the program.  Details:  began circ of kindles in January of this year, began with 18 kindles and then added 6 addition ones and 15 nooks.  Kindle has 1:6 title distribution on the kindle.  So, they call 6 kindles a “pod” and purchase multiple pods.  Pay $10 per title and share with 6 devices, average of $2.00 per title. Continue reading Building an eReader Collection, the Duke University Library experience

Articles of Interest

Ebook restrictions leave libraries facing virtual lockout

The End of the Textbook as We Know It – Technology

SLJ Leadership Summit 2010: Librarians and Ereaders

New Barnes & Noble children’s e-book program hints at color touchscreen Nook

An Amazon Digital Book Rental Plan? – Inside Higher Ed

Source: New Nook is Android-based, full-color – CNET News

Save on textbooks Actions for Students – Student PIRGs

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

Articles of Interest

I missed this last Friday, sorry for the long list.

PA sets out restrictions on library e-book lending | theBookseller.com

UK Publishers Association sets out restrictions on ebook lending – stupid!

Specter of e-book piracy looms large on horizon

If Libraries are Screwed, so are the Rest of Us | Digital Book World

How five e-readers stacked up – USA Today

In Digital Age, Students Still Cling to Paper Textbooks

The Thinking LMS (Learning Management System) – Inside Higher Ed

Kindles at high school bring praise, surprises – one month of use at Clearwater High School

6 things I would do today if I were a bookstore owner waiting for Google Editions

Honey, I Shrunk the E-Book: Amazon Slicing “Singles” for Kindle

Libertary: new book reading site

Amazon has 76% of e-book market, survey reports

Kindles, Sony & Nook e-Readers Allowing Libraries To Thrive In Information Age?

CUNY to launch Entourage Edge pilot program

As Textbooks Go Digital, Will Professors Build Their Own Books? – Technology

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

New Articles of Interest

Standards & Best Practices – Identifiers – Roadmap of Identifiers …BISG

Video – Students Love AccessMyLibrary School Edition – Gale/Cengage

Hands-On with a New e-Reader – NYTimes.com

Library Labs Turn to Their Patrons for Project Ideas – Wired Campus

Why Share Open Educational Resources? – College Open Textbooks Blog

Library can’t lend an eBook to Kindle user | StarTribune.com

Xerox to sell and service Espresso Book Machines

Kobo announces WiFi ereader – faster processor, new screen

Ready to ditch paper? Here are the top 10 e-readers

Kno announces 14-inch single-screen tablet

Amazon Patent Could Charge For Browsing A Book Online – eBookNewser

Amazon launches “Kindle on the Web”

Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets

A must read post from the Librarian in Black blog, Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets, offers a summation from 3 speakers at this event held in San Francisco on September 21st.  They include Paul Sims, Ann Awakuni, and Henry Bankhead.

A few clips from the post:

Paul Sims, “He believes that eBooks have the potential to disrupt our ability to provide access to collections. He quoted the ALA Core Value about Access: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” eBooks are preventing us from meeting this core value.” Continue reading Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets

New Articles of Interest

Tons of good reads these last few days.  Have a look:

Why Metadata Matters for the Future of E-Books

How Apple and Amazon Are Screwing You on Ebooks

Three new ebook platforms nearing their debut

Seize and Solve This Challenge: Keeping Libraries Viable in this EReading World

Apple Faces Class Action Suit Because iPad Not Like Book

Digital Lending Goes into OverDrive

PLAYBACK: Digital Books Come of Age (Or) The Textbook is Dead; Long Live the Textbook » Spotlight

Kindle 3 vs Kindle 2 in size plus hands-on report by PC World’s Perenson – photos also

BISG Study – 7% of eBook downloads are from a library

The Book Industry Study Group, along with a variety of corporate sponsors, launched a study in late 2009 about consumer attitudes toward e-book reading.  Consumers were asked a series of questions in Nov. 2009, Jan. 2010 and again in July 2010.  Some initial results were released during a twitter #followreader discussion hosted by O’Reilly TOC.  The following is an excerpt from the TOC post:  (note that “library” is reported for 7% of ebook downloads) (after original post found out that Kelly from BISG said that library downloads are so much in their infancy they don’t have a large enough sample.  They hope to do a survey soon regarding this.) Continue reading BISG Study – 7% of eBook downloads are from a library

New Kindle Gets Thumbs Up from National Federation of the Blind

Flashback to fall 2009 and the pilot textbook study with the Kindle DX on 4 college campuses.  Result…failure due to law suit from the National Federation of the Blind.  The device, not accessible.  Luckily Amazon learned from this mistake and went back to development, producing their new Kindle with a voice guide that reads all menu options aloud so blind and other print-disabled people can navigate the device menus.

Kudos from the Federation Press Release: “Dr. Marc Maurer, President of the National Federation of the Blind, said: “We commend Amazon on the unveiling of a new Kindle that blind and print-disabled people can use.  In order to compete in today’s digital society, blind and print-disabled people must be able to access the same reading technologies as the sighted.  The National Federation of the Blind has long been urging Amazon to make its reading device accessible, and we are pleased that our efforts have come to fruition.”

Source:  Teleread.org

Webinar Summary eBooks vs. Apps: Pros, Cons, and Possibilities

I attended the Digital Book World/Aptara webinar today -eBooks vs. Apps:  The Pros, Cons, and Possibilities.  My notes are below, summarizing the content.  Very interesting webinar and some really good content, eye opening for a librarian to see what features are being discussed for enhanced ebooks, brings back memories of interfaces past and present.  Slides are available – definitely look at the comparison chart, discussed below.

Speakers: Eric Freese, Pablo Defendini and Peter Costanzo; Moderator:  Guy LeCharles Gonzalez

enhanced ebooks – are easier to develop because it the preparation of a data file, usually less expensive,  based on a standard,  interoperable because they are built on EPUB, but some vendors will wrap DRM around them making them slightly inoperable.

apps – are programs specifically written for a platform and interoperability cannot be guaranteed; easier for the functionality to be successful by it required custom development expertise. Continue reading Webinar Summary eBooks vs. Apps: Pros, Cons, and Possibilities

eBook vs. Hardcover: Beyond the Headlines

Another great summary article from Digital Book World, this time written by Guy LeCharles Gonzalez, “eBook vs. Hardcover:  Beyond the Headlines.”  Gonzalez analyzes the Amazon announcement that it’s eBook sales now outnumber hardback sales.  He states 3 important takeaways:

  • the iPad is not a replacement for the Kindle, but complimentary.  The long game for Amazon always has been leveraging their existing customer base and becoming the dominant seller of eBooks
  • eBooks fit perfectly into Amazons long tail strategy
  • Amazon chooses words carefully, stating their “hardcover sales continue to grow”

Gonzalez also says, “eBooks undoubtedly offer the opportunity to expand overall book sales and direct engagement with readers, but only if publishers can get above the trees and take a look at the forest.”

New Articles of Interest

I’m way behind on posting links to articles I’ve bookmarked in delicious.  There’s been so much activity in the industry these last few weeks that I can’t keep up.  So, here is a long list of things I’ve found from the past month.

Amazon Ups the Anti in eBook Price Wars; Rumors Say Apple is Shaky on iPad Content for Launch

Focusing on WorldCat, OCLC Sells NetLibrary to EBSCO, Thins FirstSearch – 3/17/2010 – Library Journal

Another publisher discovers free e-books lead to greater sales

Results for Read an EBook Week 2010 by Rita Toews

Ebooks as a textbook saver: can it work for some students?

The Case for Textbooks | American Libraries Magazine Continue reading New Articles of Interest

10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Earlier this week I attended the O’Reilly Tools of Change (TOC) Conference for the first time.  Over 1250 attendees gathered in New York City to discuss and network   about issues and trends in publishing, in particular, digital publishing.  While much of the information presented was for the publishing industry, I did manage to find several great ideas and concepts that relate to libraries.  I’d like to share these with you, in no apparent order. Continue reading 10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians