Tag Archives: Amazon Kindle

Articles of Interest

Sorry for the long list, I was out last week and didn’t get to post this.

News: The E-Reader Effect – Inside Higher Ed

Ten must-have iPad apps for readers, by Jane Litte | TeleRead

Kindle/Nook Touch comparison review | TeleRead

E-Readers and the Future of Reading: Notes from Florida

Nook WiFi and Kobo eReader Touch Edition assault the Amazon Kindle fortress: a chart — Engadget

Creating a New University Press « The Scholarly Kitchen

Cambridge University Press to recreate textbooks for iPad | TeleRead

Amazon Makes Move to Join Book Publishing Big Leagues — Tech News and Analysis

Aptara Signs Inkling For Digital Textbooks – eBookNewser

Back to the Future: The Changing Paradigm for College Textbooks and Libraries — Campus Technology

Barnes & Noble goes after Kindle with Nook Simple Touch Reader

E-book report: Nook is up, iPad still catching up – USATODAY.com

What Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) Does and Doesn’t Mean: An FAQ « The Scholarly Kitchen

An Ebook Pilot Project Tests Collaboration of Publishers and Libraries

Overdrive, Evernote now support the NookColor | The Digital Reader

The Kno Textbook App Hits The iPad

Go To Hellman: EPUB Really IS a Container

Google books settlement conference settles on more time to settle | TeleRead

ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

ALA TechSource has just opened registration for the upcoming webinar series on e-books and e-readers.  I hope you can join us.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library
with Sue Polanka

Two 90-minute sessions
Thursdays 8/4/11 and 8/11/11
2:30 – 4:00 PM EDT | 1:30 – 3:00 PM CDT
12:30 – 2:00 PM MDT | 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM PDT

With the exploding popularity of e-books and e-reading devices, librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate them into their services and collections. Sue Polanka is back by popular demand to present this two-session ALA TechSource workshop on how to go about it. With her practical guidance you will learn how to begin purchasing and lending e-books for your library, and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use. Continue reading ALA TechSource webinar series – Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library

Articles of Interest

3M announces Cloud Library e-book lending service for ’21st century’ libraries — Engadget

Mobile Reading REALLY Comes of Age — An Information-packed Slide Deck Worth Viewing « The Scholarly Kitchen

How To Download eBooks From Your Local Library – eBookNewser

8,000 authors choose Open Access and see direct evidence of the positive impact

Jailbreak Your Kindle for Dead Simple Screensaver Customization – How-To Geek

Cheap isn’t Always the Best Price – eBookNewser

eBooks: Smithsonian Libraries Converts Digital Publications for eReaders; Material is Free To Download « INFOdocket

News: A Hole Lot of Books – Inside Higher Ed

iPad, Tablet Users Prefer Digital Texts — Campus Technology

6 Companies Aiming to Digitize the Textbook Industry

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 3

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Articles of Interest – Kindle edition

A summary of the various articles about Amazon’s announcement to work with libraries via OverDrive, plus a couple of others on Amazon.

Kindle Library Lending and OverDrive – What it means for libraries and schools – OverDrive blog post

Amazon to Allow Library Lending of Kindle Books (Updated) Library Journal

Librarian’s Hope for a “Seamless Experience” with Amazon Kindle – Library Journal

Amazon Continues to Push Book innovation with Library Lending and Ad-Supported Kindles – Scholarly Kitchen

After Kindle Lending, the Deluge « LJ Insider

Amazon to launch library lending for Kindle books – USATODAY.com

Kindle Library Lending Announcement Raises Questions – Information Today

Library eBooks Coming to the Kindle – eBookNewser

Amazon To Bring Ebook Lending to Local Libraries – Mashable

Kinboox – New eBook Lending Site Launched – eBookNewser

SEC is Investigating Amazon About the Sales Tax Disputes – eBookNewser

Achtung! German Kindle Store Opens – eBookNewser

Flat World Knowledge releases Make It Your Own platform

Reprinted in full from Information Today NewsBreaks, by Paula Hane.

Flat World Knowledge, a publisher of free and open college textbooks for students, announced the release of a new platform called MIYO (Make It Your Own). The fully-automated system gives professors greater control over textbook content, and the ability, with one click, to make their modified book available to students free online or in multiple, low-cost digital and print formats.

MIYO (mee-oh) transforms a static textbook into an adaptable learning platform by combining a digital-first architecture with Flat World’s open licensing model that grants faculty the right to revise, remix and share its textbooks. The new system uses familiar drag-and-drop and click features that allow instructors to easily move or delete chapters and sections; upload Word and PDF documents; add notes and exercises; insert video and hyperlinks; edit sentences; and incorporate other content that is free to reuse under a Creative Commons open license. Continue reading Flat World Knowledge releases Make It Your Own platform

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Way! Kindle owners CAN borrow books from public libraries

I never thought I’d see the day!  Great news Amazon and OverDrive. News release from Kindle here.

From a Publishers Weekly article:  Amazon announced this morning that Kindle owners will soon be able to borrow books from public libraries. Working with vendor OverDrive, which manages e-book lending for the vast majority of public libraries, the deal will make thousands of titles available via more than 11,000 of OverDrive’s public library partners. To date, Kindle has been noticeably absent from library lending, as OverDrive’s service worked only with ePub-enabled devices, including the Sony Reader, the Nook, iPads, and smartphones. Amazon officials said that with Kindle Library Lending, library-ebooks managed by OverDrive will now be available for all generations of Kindle devices and for use with free Kindle reading apps on most other devices, including Android, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone.

The service will launch later this year.

Argentine Library Association Conference -eBook Highlights

Today I presented at the Argentine Library Association Conference about ebooks in US Libraries, thanks to an invitation from the American Embassy (in Buenos Aires) Information Resource Center.  I offered information about purchasing and accessing eBooks and about lending eReaders in libraries.  But, I learned quite a bit in return!  For example, no one who attended my presentation (about 80 librarians) offered ebooks in their library.  Also, only 2 of the attendees owned an eReader (one Kindle and one iPad if you are counting).  Why?  There just are not many Spanish language eBooks available for libraries and the format has not become as popular yet.   I expect this will change soon, as more publishers offer eBooks and US publishers move into the South American market. Continue reading Argentine Library Association Conference -eBook Highlights

Amazon Pulls Plug on Lendle.me

Reprinted in full from PAFA.net – http://www.pafa.net/archives/3129

Lendle.me, one of the new and very popular ebook lending services, was shut down today. Amazon has pulled the plug on them. The API that connects them to the Amazon database has been revoked. According the a@lendleapp tweet, Amazon said Lendle doesn’t “serve the principal purpose of driving sales of products and services on the Amazon site.” Other lending sites have also had their API pulled according to this statement from Lendle. Continue reading Amazon Pulls Plug on Lendle.me

The Future of Academic Reading – BGSU Discussion

Today I attended a discussion at Bowling Green State University on the future of academic reading.  It was a day long session involving a panel discussion of students and faculty, along with Amy Pawlowski, the Web Applications Manager at the Cleveland Public Library and myself as respondents.

The panelists were mostly upper-class and graduate students, and several faculty/administrators using a variety of devices and tools to read books. Below is a summary of the comments from the panelists.  Consider this a snapshot of individuals, each offering a slightly different perspective on eReading, but with many commonalities.

Some interesting quotes from panelists and audience members:

“I didn’t want my fundamental reading experience to change.  I didn’t want my book to tell me I had email.”

“I covet my print books, I don’t like to break the spine on them.”

“Someone told me to get a nook because I could share my books, why would I want to share?”

“After the students [3rd graders] read books on the iPad, they wanted to keep reading.”

In addition to my summary below of the morning session,  BGSU representatives blogged the discussions.  Those can be found here:

Continue reading The Future of Academic Reading – BGSU Discussion

Articles of Interest

Where Do Libraries Fit in the Ebook Ecosystem? | Digital Book World

The rise of the 99-cent Kindle e-book – CNET News

The New Economics of the University Press — A Report from the AAUP

Ohio System teams with Flat World Knowledge on free digital textbooks

Interview with Ingram’s Skip Prichard

Iowa to Launch Statewide Ebook Program

TidBITS Entertainment: OverDrive, Bluefire, and the EPUBlic Library

McGraw-Hill’s iPad-enhanced ebooks by Inkling

Could the Kindle be free by the end of the year?

Articles of Interest

McGraw-Hill’s iPad-enhanced ebooks by Inkling

Could the Kindle be free by the end of the year?

Barnes & Noble claims 25% of US e-book market share

David Rothman promotes the National Digital Library on the Chronicle of Higher Education

Go To Hellman: HarperCollins and the Suspension of eBook …

Podcast: The Future of the Textbook, as Seen by Publishers

How to turn the Nook Color into a fully-functional Android tablet

Can You Actually “Sell” an E-Book? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Shh! eBooks and the Quiet Conspiracy against Public Libraries

Exclusive: Kno Student Tablet Start-Up in Talks to Sell Off Tablet Part of Its Business

Articles of Interest

US Justice Department and FTC looking into Apple’s subscription service; EU monitoring as well

What We Talk About When We Talk About Business Models – The Scholarly Kitchen

Sustainable Business Models for Open Textbooks

My experience with the Espresso Book Machine

Publishing CTOs Want Standard Formats – eBookNewser

The True Cost of Publishing on the Amazon Kindle

Global eReader Sales Expected To Grow To $8.2 Billion By 2014 – eBookNewser

The Kindle Will (Finally) Get Page Numbers

OERs: the good, the bad and the ugly

Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

Springer, who has existing eRetail partnerships with Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble, and others, announced this week the addition of the Google eBookstore for Springer eBook titles.

From their press release:  Springer eBooks can now also be purchased via Google’s eBookstore. Google currently holds the biggest collection of Springer eBooks with more than 52,000 books, which is a combination of physically scanned books published prior to 2006 and PDF file submissions since 2006. Springer adds 4,000 newly published titles per year.

Springer eBooks are also available on Amazon for the Kindle, and in the near future Barnes & Noble for the NookStudy.com platform, Kobo Books, B&T BLIO, Entourage and Apple’s iBooks, which is now receiving books in the free and open ebook format ePub. Springer will soon also deliver books in ePub format to Amazon for the Kindle. Continue reading Springer eBooks now also available in the Google eBookstore

TOC Keynote- Kevin Kelly, Wired

What Technology Wants, Kevin’s new book.  He says it’s the last paper book he’ll write because he is learning so much about digital publishing.

Kevin’s keynote discussed “What’s Next” in his view and he offered 6 trends (verbs), screening, interacting, sharing, accessing, flowing, generating.

Screening – screens everywhere, we are moving from people of the book, where author/authority go hand in hand, to people of the screen.  We are surrounded by screens, screens are becoming cheap enough to put anywhere.  This will be the context where we will publish books.  eInk, could it become bound into a flexible book? Screens are the portals into the machine for everything – books, TV, video, radio, web, etc..  One screen for all.  Orality – Literacy – Visuality. Continue reading TOC Keynote- Kevin Kelly, Wired

TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Summary of Tools of Change session, reprinted in full from Teleread.com by Paul Biba

Bill Godfrey (Elsevier), Rich Rothstein (HarperCollins Publishers), Andrew Savikas (O’Reilly Media, Inc.)Moderated by: Abe Murray (Google, Inc. )

Savikas: first foray in 1987. Stared with cd books and online books in 2001, which was first substantial digital presence. Wish is that Amazon would adopt epub as their standard. Digital is now about a decade for O’Reilly, and one of the biggest changes is that there are many more markets for digital products. Can’t imaging what it will be like in 10 years. Book will not go away – neither the package nor the long form narrative type of content. There will be a whole new category of new media that probably can’t be called books any more. Over the last 100 years more and more layers built up between publishers and consumers and web is bringing us back to a more direct relationship. In his experience the interest in enhanced ebooks seems to come from the publishers more than it does from the reader. Now that books can know that they are being read this can lead to enhanced opportunities. Databases are prime examples for turning into enhanced books. Not convinced that advertising will be as much of the future of newspapers and magazines it has been in the passed. Newspapers have lost the monopoly of being a source of local information. There is what value and need for what newspapers provide, but the package is obsolete. Publishers should be taking a stronger role in advocating with the retailers and device makers. Big piece of the epub 3 revision is to support dynamic delivery to different devices. Continue reading TOC – Publisher CTO Panel, the future of ebook technology, TeleRead

Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here

Last summer, Library Journal and School Library Journal conducted an eBook survey for libraries.  The survey was designed to measure current and projected ebook availability in libraries, user preferences in terms of access and subjects, and library purchasing terms and influences.  They included an academic, public, and school library version of the survey.  Hundreds of questions were asked and hundreds of libraries responded. The results of those surveys were published in November, 2010 in three separate reports.  The executive summaries of each are available on the Library Journal site (and linked below), and full reports are available for purchase.  There were 1,842 respondents, broken down to 364 academic, 781 public, and 697 school libraries.  I’ve captured some of the data to share with you, but the reports are full of additional information on budgets, marketing, barriers to adoption, patron preference, and much, much more.  A primer on ebook readers and formats is in the appendix of each full report. Thanks to Josh Hadro at Library Journal for sharing the reports with me and allowing me to publish some of the data here on No Shelf Required. Continue reading Library Journal Publishes Library eBook Survey Results – Sample Data Here