Tag Archives: AAP

11 key qualities of a K-12 digital resource for the classroom

child-1183465Through the process of identifying quality materials, AAP (American Association of Publishers)—representing nearly 400 member organizations that include major commercial, digital learning, education and professional publishers as well as independents, non-profits, university presses and scholarly societies—has recently identified the 11 “essential components” to help educators recognize which products are right for their classroom. These include (and are listed in this slide):

Continue reading 11 key qualities of a K-12 digital resource for the classroom

AAP supports EPUB3, new initiative accelerates adoption

This is big news for EPUB3 adoption – accelerated across-the-board adoption.  I hope they are successful, this will be a great service for those with disabilities.  More from the AAP press release:

Wednesday, 24 July 2013 | Ed McCoyd, Andi Sporkin

The Association of American Publishers supports the establishment of EPUB 3 as the standard global distribution format for eBooks and has embarked on a new initiative designed to rapidly advance the format’s implementation in the marketplace.

The EPUB 3 Implementation Project is being developed in a partnership with retailers, digital content distributors, device makers, reading systems providers, assistive technology experts and standards organizations, with the support and engagement of leading advocates for people with disabilities. Continue reading AAP supports EPUB3, new initiative accelerates adoption

Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session

On Tuesday, May 3rd I recorded a 15 minute segment for the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education on Think TV, the local public television station in Dayton, Ohio.  My topic was the rise of digital textbooks and options available for students and faculty to access and produce textbooks and learning materials.  Below is a snapshot of my general comments with links to various sources for more information.

Our current textbook system is broken.  We have arrived at $200 textbooks and have students who cannot afford them.  As a result, students try to borrow a textbook from the library or a friend (sometimes the older edition), purchase a used one, or go without.  Neither of these options provides revenue to the publisher, thus resulting in higher price points in an effort to recover the costs or production.   What can we do about this catch 22? Continue reading Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session

Articles of Interest

For the week of March 21st

Inkling: Another Digital Textbook Approacheth, But this time, It has Friends: The Scholarly Kitchen

Research Triangle Libraries Get $41K Grant To Explore Consortial Ebook Models

The Vexed Problem of Libraries, Publishers, and E-books ” The …

HarperCollinsGate: Some Thoughts ” The Scholarly Kitchen

Innovation and Longevity in Digital Publishing: Surfing the S Curve – The Scholarly Kitchen

Amazon Appstore for Android is open

E-book pricing hinges on customer perception of value

Google Books Settlement statements of: AAP, Open Book Alliance, Nat. Fed. of the Blind

Judge Rules Against Google Books Settlement

Google Books Settlement Rejected

The Google Books Settlement was rejected on Tuesday.  There has been a ton of press on this already.  Here are links to several key articles and documents:

PDF of Judge Denny Chin’s decision

The Google books settlement:  Where things stand and some suggestions for what’s next -  via The Scholarly Kitchen

Google Book Settlement Rejected:  Press Review, Comments and Resources – via INFODocket

Statements from the AAP, Open Book Alliance, and National Federation of the Blind – via TeleRead

Please Refine Your Search Terms – Higher Ed News


January eBook sales more than doubled, but at the cost of print?

From an article at Read Write Web by Audrey Watters:  “The Association of American Publishers (AAP) released its figures from January 2011 book sales, and the news echoes what we’ve come to expect: more readers are turning to e-books, and they’re doing so in droves. In face, e-book sales have more than doubled since the same time last year. According to the AAP, e-book sales are up 115.8%, from $32.4 million to $69.9 million year-over-year.”

Watters asks, But how does that impact the rest of the publishing industry?  According to the numbers, there were overall declining sales for books.  “But the drop in sales overall was small – just 1.9% – as total book sales across all platforms and across all categories fell from $821.5 million in January 2010 to $805.7 million in January of this year.” Continue reading January eBook sales more than doubled, but at the cost of print?

Webinar Summary- Consumer Book Trends 2009 – Hosted by Bowker & AAP

Attended the Bowker/AAP webinar on consumer book trends for 2009.  This focused on Q3 numbers in 2009 with a close look at 2 user groups -  18 – 29 year old males and 30 – 40 year old females.  My notes are below, pardon the typos, was typing fast and furious to catch the data.

the Speakers:

  • Tina Jordan, VP AAP – moderator
  • Kelly Gallagher, VP Publishing Services, Bowker – speaker

Bowker announced yesterday that 1/3 Americans cutting down on book purchases Continue reading Webinar Summary- Consumer Book Trends 2009 – Hosted by Bowker & AAP

AAP/Bowker Webinar on Consumer Book Buying – Dec. 16th

Wednesday, December 16th from 2 – 3 p.m. EST, AAP and Bowker will host a webinar on consumer book buying.  I attended a webinar back in October moderated and presented by Tina Jordan and Kelly Gallagher and it was really informative and well organized, both were excellent speakers.  The details of the webinar are below and registration is online. Continue reading AAP/Bowker Webinar on Consumer Book Buying – Dec. 16th

US Consumer Book Buying webinar, summary

Bowker and AAP sponsored a webinar today on US Consumer Book Buying.  It was incredibly well organized and full of good data.  My notes and comments are included below.

Speakers

  • Tina Jordan (AAP)  moderator
  • Kelly Gallagher (Bowker) speaker

2009 data, first 6 months, based on what consumer is buying/reading

  • 2008 – e-commerce the dominant channel for book sales, beating out brick n mortar
  • 2009 – so far, large chain bookstores are back at the top
  • Consumer is King and defines the marketplace, we can’t publish like we used to – the old supply/demand model.

3 indicators – impact of economy, competition for leisure time, product selection (genres, formats)  Continue reading US Consumer Book Buying webinar, summary

Webinar on Consumer Book Buying

From a Bowker Press Release –
Bowker and AAP Will Host Webinar on Consumer Book Buying

“The Big Picture” Will Highlight 2009 Consumer Demographics and Behavior

NEW PROVIDENCE, NJ–(Marketwire – September 22, 2009) – Who is today’s book consumer, where are they shopping and how successful are we at reaching them will be the subject of a forthcoming hour-long webinar for industry professionals, a first-of-its-kind sneak peek into book buying trends for the first half of 2009. Set for Thursday, October 22, from 2:00 p.m – 3 pm EDT, the webinar will be co-hosted by Bowker and the Association of American Publishers (AAP). Continue reading Webinar on Consumer Book Buying

Ebook sales continue to rise – latest IDPF info

Ebook sales continue to rise – latest IDPF info

By Paul Biba  teleread.orgTrade Stats_09_03.jpgWell, it looks as if the rationale for TeleRead’s existence is still extant. Ebook sales are just continuing to increase. Here’s the info I got by email from Michael Smith of the IDPF this afternoon: Continue reading Ebook sales continue to rise – latest IDPF info

Webinar on the Google Book Settlement next week

The Copyright Clearance Center is sponsoring a webinar on April 14th called, The Authors Guild, AAP, Google Settlement: What Authors & Publishers Need to Know as May 5th Approaches. More info here.

Details include:

Tuesday, April 14, 2009 12:00 pm
Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -04:00, New York)

Tuesday, April 14, 2009 5:00 pm
GMT Daylight Time (GMT +01:00, London) Continue reading Webinar on the Google Book Settlement next week

Digital Book 2009: An eBook Stimulus Plan for Publishing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Michael Smith Executive Director International Digital Publishing Forum 905-235-4373 msmith@idpf.org

Digital Book 2009: An eBook Stimulus Plan for Publishing

NYC Conference to focus on booming eBook business and winning commercial models

New York, NY April 06, 2009: The Association of American Publishers (AAP) reported last week that eBook sales represent the fastest growing segment of the industry while US book sales are in decline across all major book publishing markets.  To promote eBook commercial success for booksellers, publishers, authors, and distributors the International Digital Publishing Forum (www.IDPF.org) will host its annual spring educational seminar on Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at the McGraw-Hill Auditorium in New York City.  Added to this fast-paced “best practices” conference will be a half-day workshop to be held on the afternoon of Monday, May 11, 2009.   Please see www.idpf.org/digitalbook09

Continue reading Digital Book 2009: An eBook Stimulus Plan for Publishing

E-books continue to grow significantly, sales reached $113 million in 2008, up 68.4%

Forwarding a post from teleread.org

By Paul Biba

That is according to the Association of American Publishers. Here is their press release (emphasis added by the Editor):

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) today released its annual estimate of total book sales in the United States. The report, which uses data from the Bureau of the Census as well as sales data from eighty-one publishers inclusive of all major book publishing media market holders, estimates that U.S. publishers had net sales of $24.3 billion in 2008, down from $25.0 billion in 2007, representing a 2.8% decrease. In the last six years the industry had a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.6%.

Trade sales of adult and juvenile books fell 5.2 percent from 2007 to $8.1 billion, CAGR fell to 2.1 percent. Growth was found in paperbound books for children and adults, with growth rates of 6.4% and 3.6% respectively. Sales in the hardcover fell 12.4% in children’s hardcover and 13% in adult hardcover.

Over the period covered by the estimated data, the CAGR for hardbound books was 0.4% for adult books and 1.5% for juvenile. Paperbound books grew 3.9% and 2.8% over the 6 years.

Educational titles had a mixed year. Sales in the Elementary (El-Hi) category, those books produced for K-12 education, fell 4.4% to $6.1 billion in 2008, CAGR for this category was 0.8%. The Higher Education category, which includes sales of college textbooks, fared better. Total sales reached $3.8 billion this year up 2.7% on 2007. This brought the CAGR for college textbooks to 3.8%

Mass Market paperbacks decreased 3.0% and brought the category CAGR to -1.9%. Total sales were $1.1 billion in 2008. Book clubs and mail-order fell for the sixth year to $600 million, a fall of 3.4%.

Audio book sales for 2008 totaled $172 million, down 21% on the prior year, CAGR for this category is still healthy at 3.1%. E-books continue to grow significantly, sales reached $113 million in 2008, up 68.4%.

Religious book sales dropped 7.6% to $724m in 2008. However over the period of the estimate it has still performed well with CAGR of 4.5%.

A complete list of the preliminary estimated book publishing industry net sales for 2008 prepared by Management Practice, Inc. is available here.

November e-book sales up 108%

The rise of e-books: IDPF reports November e-book sales up 108 percent—and here’s some analysis
By Mark Coker, founder of Smashwords

image Mark Coker is founder of Smashwords and Dovetail Public Relations, as well as moderator of a February 10 panel at Tools of Change on “The Rise of E-Book.” See a San Jose Mercury News Q & A on Smashwords (a publisher for independent writers), which recently signed a Stanza-related distribution deal. – D.R.

The IDPF says e-book sales were up 108 percent for the month of November 2008 compared to the same period a year ago. The data is provided in conjunction with surveys conducted by the American Association of Publishers, and represents wholesale sales from only 13 U.S.-based e-book publishers, so total reported sales figures understate actual sales.

imageFor the first eleven months of 2008, e-book sales were up about 64 percent, according to the IDPF.

Dig beneath the surface, and the numbers are striking. E-book sales are surging while the entire trade book industry suffers a decline. Are print sales suffering at the hands of e-book sales? Unlikely. Something else is happening.

For the five years between 2002 and 2007 (click here for data; opens a PDF), overall trade book sales averaged an annual increase of 2.5 percent. That’s lower than inflation, which means unit sales probably decreased.

By contrast, e-books for the same period turned in a 55.7 percent average annualized increase in sales revenue.

Tiny base—but still an accelerating growth rate

Granted, the robust sales growth for e-books was off of a tiny base to begin with. But fast forward to October of 2008, the date for which year-to-date sales are reported on the AAP web site , and you see overall trade book sales for the first 9 months of the year were down 3.4 percent while e-book sales were up about 58 percent. So the rate of e-book sales accelerated during the first 9 months of 2008 compared to the previous five years.

More interesting, for the month of October the AAP reported overall trade book sales suffered a 20 percent drop in the year over year monthly comparison, while e-book sales accelerated to 73 percent growth.

Numbers for November and December aren’t yet published on the AAP site, though today’s numbers from the IDPF, which are supplied by the AAP, indicated that e-book sales have accelerated yet again, up 108 percent for November.

As any numbers guy or gal will tell you, it’s easy to show great sales growth when you’re growing off of a small base. But when sales show sequential acceleration off of sequentially increasing bases (meaning, you grow faster as you grow larger), then something really interesting is taking place.

If we conservatively estimate that overall trade sales for 2008 declined 3 percent, and e-books sales increased 70 percent, then wholesale e-book sales will rise to $114 million and overall trade book sales will decline to $24.21 billion. In other words, e-books will still only represent 1/2 of 1 percent of book industry sales, at least here in the US.

If you extrapolate the 70 percent growth for five more years (and I would argue that 70 percent is a relatively conservative number), then e-books rise to $1.6 billion, and assuming a 2 percent growth rate of the overall trade book sales to $26.7 billion (generous), e-books would then represent a respectable 6 percent of sales.

If you’re attending the Tools of Change conference February 9-11, I invite you to attend a panel I’m moderating entitled, “The Rise of E-Books,” where we’ll explore the past, present and future of e-books and try to understand the implications of these numbers for publishers and authors alike.

In the meantime, if you’re an author, you need to start exposing your books to the digital realm. Clearly, as the numbers above indicate, you should continue to publish in print because e-book sales will account for only a small percentage of your overall sales. In the years ahead, however, e-books will become an increasingly important format for book consumption.

eBook Sales Up Says AAP

AAP reports eBook sales jumped 77.8% to 5.1 million for September year to date.  However, overall book sales decreased.  Details of other categories below:

AAP Book Sales: Declines for September, Year-to-Date

In September, net sales decreased 2% to $1.062 billion for 80 publishers that reported to the Association of American Publishers. Net sales for the year through September have fallen 1.5% to $7.718 billion.
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E-books jumped 77.8% to $5.1 million.
Children’s/YA hardcover increased 41.9% to $119.8 million.
Higher education rose 18.4% to $338.2 million.
Professional and scholarly edged up 6.8% to $60.5 million.
University press paperbacks gained 4.4% to $6.5 million.

Adult hardcover fell 29.8% to $173.3 million.
Children’s/YA paperback declined 19.1% to $51.5 million.
El-Hi dropped 17.6% to $325.1 million.
Audiobooks decreased 12.3% to $18.7 million.
Religious books fell 11.8% to $76.8 million.
Adult paperback decreased 8.6% to $134.7 million.
Adult mass market dropped 8.3% to $67.4 million.
University press hardcovers slid 3.6% to $6.3 million.

Book Sales Increase at Year’s End

Book Sales Increase at Year’s End

February 13, 2008, New York, NY:

Sales of University Press Hardcover books were up by 3.3 percent in December with sales of $6.8 million; sales were also up by 8.1 percent for the year. University Press Paperback sales posted an increase of 0.6 percent for the month with sales totaling $10.1 million; sales were up 3.2 percent for the year. Sales in the Professional and Scholarly category were down by 12.4 percent in December ($99.0 million); however sales were up 2.9 percent for the year.

The Association of American Publishers is the national trade association of the U.S. book publishing industry. AAP’s more than 300 members include most of the major commercial publishers in the United States, as well as smaller and non-profit publishers, university presses and scholarly societies—small and large. AAP members publish hardcover and paperback books in every field, educational materials for the elementary, secondary, postsecondary, and professional markets, scholarly journals, computer software, and electronic products and services. The protection of intellectual property rights in all media, the defense of the freedom to read and the freedom to publish at home and abroad, and the promotion of reading and literacy are among the Association’s highest priorities.

NOTE: All sales figures cited in this release are domestic net sales