ProQuest Dissertations Now Discoverable in Google Scholar

From ProQuest:

Following the indexing of millions of scholarly articles in Google Scholar in 2015, ProQuest and Google are expanding their collaboration by indexing almost half a million full text dissertations from the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database (PQDT), the leading source of emerging research from the world’s great universities.

Google Scholar users can now seamlessly discover and access this set of full text dissertations in their libraries’ subscription collections. The user experience is improved and libraries benefit from increased usage for their content investment.

“Dissertations are excellent sources for finding emerging research and new voices,” said Allan Lu, Vice President Research Tools, Services and Platforms. “ProQuest has curated this content over decades and we’re continually looking for ways to simplify its discovery and access.” Continue reading ProQuest Dissertations Now Discoverable in Google Scholar

#audiobookwish X 4

An underutilized hashtag on Twitter points up the books readers wish would migrate into listening format. Some are new titles, many are never-bestsellers that can still be found readily in current print editions, several tagged posts point up the dearth of titles representing affinity groups. Here’s a sampler of what and why readers want to push against the boundaries of audiobook publishing’s current offerings.

#audiobookwish Practice inclusivity in romance, both in print and in audio editions

While it came as no surprise to romance writers of color–nor to many readers of color as well as some who are white–last week’s publication of the Ripped Bodice bookstore’s report “The State of Racial Diversity in Romance Publishing, 2016” confirms that the disparity between both writer demographics and publishing attainment is wide. In fact, the romance genre also relies on small publishers to bring out any titles featuring romantic characters who are anywhere in the LGBTQIA family as well. Breaking down that print availability even further, we find an audiobook world in which virtually everyone is white and straight—unless it’s a teen title (both It’s Not Like It’s a Secret and If I Was Your Girl went to audio quickly, for example, and various youth award winning print titles are made into audiobooks ahead of the literary awards they earn). Continue reading #audiobookwish X 4

This week in Literature and Arts

Happy birthday to the one, the only Groucho, born October 2, 1890, on East 78th Street in Manhattan.


October 2, 1959: Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone premieres on CBS with the episode, “Where is Everybody?”


Continue reading This week in Literature and Arts

De Gruyter launches Science Discoveries, science news site to feature information based on published research

De Gruyter has recently launched Science Discoveries, an international science news site focused on research advancements in medicine, health, environment and technology. The site features selected research published in De Gruyter journals.

From the press release:

Publishing article highlights as well as multimedia content several times a week, Science Discoveries aims to showcase peer-reviewed scientific research in a context that helps scientific advancements reach a wider audience, not only academics and professionals, but also general science enthusiasts.

Featured research currently available includes an article on the devastating effect natural disasters have on pets and livestock from the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (JHSEM), a contribution on insect silk and its medical application from the Journal of Biosciences, and an article entitled “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” on human aggression from the journal NeuroForum. Continue reading De Gruyter launches Science Discoveries, science news site to feature information based on published research

Writers Boon, a one-stop guide and marketplace for indie authors trying to find their way

What happens if you map the path from wanting to write to becoming a self-published author, throw in a bit of the Groupon idea, and then build a website for authors? You get Writers Boon, a one-stop guide and marketplace for indie authors trying to find their way through the maze of writing, revising, editing and publishing a book.

Carol Vorvain, the woman behind the project, is an author and attorney who lives in Australia. Her own books are about life and living joyfully and adventurously. You can find them on her website http://carolvorvain.com or on Amazon. Continue reading Writers Boon, a one-stop guide and marketplace for indie authors trying to find their way

Book of the Week: Henry and the Hidden Treasure (B.C.R. Fegan)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week, including a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

Henry and the Hidden Treasure

BCR Fegan is an award-winning author who has written a number of fairy tales and fantasies for children and young adults. Raised on a small hobby farm, only minutes from some of Australia’s greatest beaches, Fegan grew up inspired by the power of nature’s ambience. From the intensity of the frequent summer storms, to the overwhelming serenity of a lonely beach in the early hours of the morning. His ravenous appetite for both reading and writing soon saw him drawing on the transformational influence of this world around him to craft short stories, poems and picture books.

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Georgia, one of the world’s oldest nations, will be the Guest of Honor at 2018 Frankfurt Book Fair

Frankfurter Buchmesse has announced next year’s Guest of Honor at the Fair: Georgia. The 2017 Guest of Honor is France.

Georgia, one of the world’s oldest nations, will be the Guest of Honor at next year’s Frankfurter Buchmesse (10–14 October 2018). In keeping with the motto “Georgia – Made by Characters”, the Guest of Honor’s time at the fair will focus not only on Georgian literature and language and on new titles in German by Georgian authors, but also on the script itself, the Georgian alphabet, which was added to UNESCO’s Cultural Heritage of Humanity list in 2016.

Created using 33 artfully curved characters whose history goes back to the 4th century, stories will be told in 2018 about the country with the long literary tradition that is located on the border between Asia and Europe – stories about Georgia’s people, culture, cuisine and many other unique features.

* * *

Press conference has been set for Thursday, 12 October 2017, at 11.00 am at Congress Center Messe Frankfurt, Level C.3, Room Illusion 2, Messe Frankfurt, Fairgrounds, Ludwig-Erhard-Anlage 1,60327 Frankfurt am Main.

Speakers will include:
• Juergen Boos, Director of the Frankfurter Buchmesse
• Mikheil Giorgadze, Minister of Culture and Monument Protection, Republic of Georgia
• Medea Metreveli, Director of the Georgian National Book Center
• Nino Haratischwili, Author

Save the Date:
The Georgian-British musician Katie Melua will be present during the ceremony when France, this year’s Guest of Honour, hands over the “GuestScroll” to the 2018 Guest of Honour, Georgia, closing the Book Fair. The ceremony will take place on Sunday, 15 October 2017 (3.30 to 4.30 pm, Forum, Level 1).

Follett launches Book Fairs

Just in from Follett:

Follett, the leader in PreK-12 education, has announced it is entering the school book fair market, a highly anticipated launch that will see the company maximize its existing partnerships with thousands of publishers to offer a vast selection of books for early education, elementary and middle school students.

The Follett Book Fairs launch begins for the 2017-18 school year on a regional basis, and then will expand throughout the country the following year. Librarians familiar with Follett have been eager to get their schools signed up. Continue reading Follett launches Book Fairs

Publishing and bibliographic jobs below the radar

Some years ago, I was impressed by a speaker at a youth enrichment services providers roundtable who came from a vocational training background and currently worked in publishing house dealing mostly with career preparation materials. The materials she shared included, surprisingly to most of us gathered, board books for toddlers as well as interactive books for older children. These were not the “When I grow up, I want to be a firefighter” flavor: instead, they exposed kids to the actual doing of things that could eventually engage their interests in jobs beyond the Top 10 every high school student recognizes as the likely “only” options.*

A few industries are good—usually at the behest of union pressure—about exposing the fact of certain jobs existing. Think about the rolling credits after a movie. While such denominating for public view doesn’t explain what exactly the key grip or best boy does functionally, the job titles are there. And there are jobs called out in the credits as well that make intuitive sense while not, more than likely, getting much air time when the conversation turns to “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Once it’s noted as a possibility, however, costume designer strikes a chord that could turn into a wholly satisfying career. Continue reading Publishing and bibliographic jobs below the radar

University of Pretoria in South Africa launches an app that provides one-click access to its library resources

Just in from Demco Software:

One of Africa’s top research institutions responds to increasing smartphone ownership with new Boopsie mobile app

South Africa currently has the highest smartphone ownership of the countries on the African continent [1], and sales of mobile devices in this region are expected to increase over the next decade [2]. In response to this trend, the Department of Library Services (DLS) at the University of Pretoria has launched a customized app that provides one-click access to its library’s assets, empowering researchers to use resources and services when and where they need them.

Fully hosted and maintained by Demco Software, the University of Pretoria’s Boopsie mobile app will feature custom branding on a user-friendly interface, facilitating seamless access to authoritative content from trusted aggregators and publishers. A modifiable banner will increase visibility of key resources, and unique features will expand access to the library. Key among these are Ask a Librarian, Catalog Search, Subject Guides, Library Locator, Location and Hours, and social media integration. Continue reading University of Pretoria in South Africa launches an app that provides one-click access to its library resources

This week in Literature and Arts

Star Wars geeks join me in 66th birthday greetings to Mark Hamill, born in Oakland, CA, September 25, 1951. Mark, I hope you have dialog in Ep. 8!

Here’s a bad pic from NYCC 2011.


Remembering Mary Astor, who died September 25, 1987, age 81. My son and I visited her grave last year in LA at Holy Cross Cemetery (not too, too far from John Ford). She was hard to find.

Forever Brigid O’Shaughnessy.


Continue reading This week in Literature and Arts

Adam Matthew to publish nearly 500 years of materials on the history of printing, publishing and bookselling

Just in from Adam Matthew:

Literary Print Culture, the latest primary source collection from Adam Matthew Digital, makes available The Stationers’ Company Archive with material from 1554 to the 21st Century.

Widely regarded as one of the most important sources for the history of the book, publishing and copyright, the archive of The Worshipful Company of Stationers & Newspaper Makers is now available for unparalleled research.

Formed in London in 1403,  was instrumental in the development of the printed book in England, exerting enormous power over the publishing industry as it developed in the early modern period. In the late 15th century, the company was granted immense power by Royal Charter to control this nascent industry, leading onto the development of “copyright.” Continue reading Adam Matthew to publish nearly 500 years of materials on the history of printing, publishing and bookselling

Book of the Week: An Avid’s Guide to Sixties Songwriters (Peter Dunbavan)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week, including a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

An Avid’s Guide to Sixties Songwriters

Peter Dunbavan was born in Preston, England, in 1951.  His diverse employment history has included working as a labourer, finance director, industrial chemist, meter reader, charity director, wallpaper warehouseman, college lecturer, and drug and alcohol rehabilitation employee. During his somewhat haphazard working life, his love of music has been a constant. He has been involved in playing live music since the age of 15. He has also been a spectacularly unsuccessful songwriter, having written over a hundred songs and still waiting for his first hit.

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Hearing the Unacceptable

The not-quite-well-named Banned Books Week is upon us again, with the annual ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom’s collection of books most frequently named in community-level challenges to fittedness for someone other than the complainant and their own children to read. This year’s list has the typical earmarks of negativity aimed at books that speak to kids at those scary ages when they are demonstrating a new level of independence from parental control: the newly minted kindergartener, the middle schooler entering adolescence, the not-quite-out-of-the-house teen who can get out and about readily without parental assist. The remainder of the Top 10 Troublemakers speaks to the American shadow disposition of Puritanism: the frank recognition of sexual behaviors, the use of proscribed language, and authorship by someone later charged with crimes.

Calling out issues of intellectual freedom regarding specifically audiobook content has, at the level of national attention, been rooted in content that remains identical between print and spoken formats, with challengers who are cited objecting to the same works in audiobook as in print and for the same reasons. Five years ago, Professor Teri LeSesne predicted the likelihood of growth in the audiobook challenge industry, again noting works in trouble due to what the authors wrote, not to hearing-specific aspect of the written. As more audiobooks are produced and available, and with audiobook publishing for children and youth—the primary targets of books that meet community challenges—reflecting new and critically reviewed authors and print works, it becomes increasingly easy to find audiobook editions of titles on the list of troublemaking titles. Continue reading Hearing the Unacceptable

EU withheld a study that shows piracy doesn’t hurt sales [in some cases it actually enhances them]

From Engadget:

“In 2013, the European Commission ordered a €360,000 ($430,000) study on how piracy affects sales of music, books, movies and games in the EU. However, it never ended up showing it to the public except for one cherry-picked section. That’s possibly because the study concluded that there was no evidence that piracy affects copyrighted sales, and in the case of video games, might actually help them.

Done by Dutch organization Ecorys, the study might have been lost altogether if not for the effort of EU parliamentarian Julia Reda. She submitted a freedom of information request in July 2017, and after stalling twice, the commission finally produced it. The conclusion? “With the exception of recently released blockbusters, there is no evidence to support the idea that online copyright infringement displaces sales,” Reda wrote on her blog.”

Read the rest of the article here.

Study points to students forgoing required learning materials due to cost; grades suffer as a result

Just in from Vital Source:

Raleigh, NC – A growing number of college students are choosing not to purchase textbooks and other required course materials in an effort to save money, according to a new study conducted by Wakefield Research on behalf of VitalSource Technologies LLC.

The study finds 85 percent of the college and university students surveyed have either waited to buy course materials until after the first day of class or opted not to purchase the materials altogether – up five percent from a similar survey conducted in 2016. Nearly all (91 percent) of the students surveyed cite cost as the reason for not buying their books, and half admit their grades suffered as a result. Continue reading Study points to students forgoing required learning materials due to cost; grades suffer as a result

Topeka-Shawnee Library’s “Community Novel Project:” Seven years of working with local authors and only getting started

If you are an author, have you ever wondered if a library could not only buy your book but provide expert help developing your writing and publishing skills? If you are a librarian, have you ever wondered why your library doesn’t go beyond holding events for local authors and actually publish some books? Lissa Staley and Miranda Ericsson, two librarians at the Topeka-Shawnee County Public Library have sorted all this out and created a program, now in its seventh year, that organizes local authors, beefs up their writing and publishing skills, and the produces print and ebook edition of a collaborative work. And yes, you read that right. Two librarians have done all this while continuing their other library work. Welcome to the TSCPL Community Novel Project.

In 2003, Lissa Staley was at work at her job as a librarian at the Topeka-Shawnee County Public Library. She noticed that one of her colleagues had put up a new display, so she stopped to look at it. This was her introduction to NaNoWriMo, the National Novel Writing Month, an event held every November since 1999. She quickly decided to participate and set to work writing a novel of her own. At the same time, the idea that everyone could be a winner, that every participant in NaNoWriMo could win by completing the first draft of a novel inspired her. Everyone could win. No one had to lose.

The next year, 2004, she began programming for local writers around NaNoWriMo. However, many of them requested help getting published, finding an editor, getting an agent, etc. There were no resources, so she could not help them. The local writers groups focused on cracking the big New York publishers. Self-publishing and the tools to support it had not evolved as far as they have, today. Continue reading Topeka-Shawnee Library’s “Community Novel Project:” Seven years of working with local authors and only getting started

Book of the Week: Peanut of Blind Faith Farm (Jim Thompson)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week, including a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

Peanut of Blind Faith Farm

Jim Thompson and his wife Laura live on a hobby farm in Jefferson County, Wisconsin. An Air Force veteran, Jim returned to Wisconsin in 1983, and graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a degree in Zoology. He spent the next 20 years with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, mostly as a Lake Michigan Fisheries Technician. Semi-retiring in 2007, he took up hobby farming. Not long after, he and Laura acquired five Shetland sheep as an experiment, to help keep the farm’s vegetation under control. The flock of five soon turned to 15, including a tiny blind lamb named Peanut, who inspired Jim and Laura to name their property Blind Faith Farm.

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Introducing The Short Story Project: A whole new way to discover, curate and appreciate short stories

Literary short stories rarely, if ever, get a chance to make an impression on their own terms, as they are usually buried in print anthologies that get lost quickly in an ever-expanding universe of published content. When short stories are given a new life in digital format—not only by extracting existing texts and migrating them online but also by translating them into several languages and adding original audio elements to each—as is the case with The Short Story Project—their impact is undeniable.

Professional reviewer Michael Rogers here sheds light on this mighty new entrant into the digital publishing and library market. NSR is pleased to publish this review and we look forward to following TSSP’s progress and development in the months and years to come.—Ed.


Stories that cross the line

Launched in 2015, The Short Story Project (TSSP) hosts a wide selection of short fiction from noted international authors. The acclaimed site—nominated for the London Book Fair’s Literary Translation Initiative Award in 2016, among others—also co-exists as an app of the same name for Androids and iOS devices. It was founded upon the belief that “reading is an experience that can make a difference. An experience that enables reflection on the human condition, inspires empathy and encourages examination; that reading is more than a pastime; it is an activity that can serve as a bridge between people and cultures, a sounding board for voices and ideas.” This belief is evident in many details, including TSSP’s tagline (Stories that Cross the Line).

TSSP endeavors to promote that philosophy through the “lively, stimulating presence of short fiction in contemporary culture,” enabling the “voices of writers from across the world be heard and resonate.” It is the creation of Iftach Alony, an Israeli-born business man with a history of successful entrepreneurial ventures. Alony is the author of two novels (2009’s Thief of Dreams, and 2012’s best-selling Spare Parts), the short story collections, Garuda’s Gaze and Plagues (of Egypt) Now (2015 and 2017, respectively), as well as the poetry collections, Let the Thorns Die (2013) and Gravity (2014). He also is the founder and coeditor of Block Magazine, a producer of several travel-films, and has served as a judge for short story competitions and other literary endeavors. Continue reading Introducing The Short Story Project: A whole new way to discover, curate and appreciate short stories

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