News Roundup [June 17, 2016]

End-of-Week E-News Round-up3

Each Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The idea is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) keep up with what is happening  beyond the confines of their companies, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and it serves a purpose that is greater than helping busy professionals stay afloat. What shapes the decision-making process involves one or all of the following:

  • focus on diversity and giving equal voice to established news sources as well as to blogs run by independent thinkers
  • promotion of efforts that support literacy (in all incarnations)
  • focus away from top markets dominating most ebook discussions
  • attention to ebook and literacy initiatives in emerging markets
  • strong interest in ideas propelling the industry forward rather than promoting special brands
  • strong interest in professionals  challenging the status quo and leading the way

Enjoy this week’s compilation. And please note the following: All titles of the articles listed below appear in the style used in the original sources; clicking on each takes you straight to the site where the article was published.

Till next week. Continue reading News Roundup [June 17, 2016]

Is your library participating in (and supporting) Indie Author Day? These organizations and libraries are.

SELF-e_IndieAuthorDay_Logo_v2

A big event is on the horizon this Fall. And NSR is proud (and honored) to be part of it (as a media supporter), especially since it is centered around libraries and reading and, most importantly, the idea that libraries must remain the places that encourage reading above all else. NSR is also the advocate for quality indie publishing, and this event is all about encouraging libraries to support and promote the work of authors from their local communities. The event is called Indie Author Day and here’s what it’s about:

Libraries across North America will host events on October 8th, 2016, designed to bring local writing communities together in their libraries to participate in author panels, book readings and signings, workshops, and presentations. Then, at 2 pm EST everyone is invited to join a digital gathering featuring Q&A with writers, agents, and industry leaders that will bring together the larger indie community. More information about Indie Author Day 2016 is available on its official site. Continue reading Is your library participating in (and supporting) Indie Author Day? These organizations and libraries are.

NSR Book of the Week: Danya: A Woman of Ancient Galilee by Anne McGivern

In an effort to draw attention to quality independent literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. This week’s pick:

Danya: A Woman of Ancient Galilee

About Author

DanyaAnne McGivern’s fascination with the study of the historical Jesus lured her into researching the history, archaeology, anthropology, and religion of early first century Palestine. In time, Danya, her first novel, sprang to life. McGivern is the co-author of two books on teaching language to developmentally disabled children. She has Master’s degrees in English and Communicative Disorders and has taught in middle school and special education settings.

About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

A new report on ebook trends is out, but its prohibitive cost makes it affordable only to some. Why?

E-Books - Market Trends & Insights - Product ImageWe learned yesterday from BusinessWire that Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “E-Books: Market Trends & Insights” report to their ‘offering.’ According to the BusinessWire site, the report presents up-to-date insights into the ebook market worldwide, including countries like the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, The Netherlands, and Spain. Featuring 22 data tables, the 18-page report consists of the following sections: an Introduction, a Market Overview, a Competitive Landscape, and an Appendix.

NSR wanted to purchase this report to share its findings with all who monitor the progress of ebooks’ positive influence on the world (the very reason for NSR’s existence), but, alas, the prohibitive cost of the 18-page document makes it impossible to do so at this time.

I am using this opportunity to reflect, with both respect and disappointment, on the cost of a document of this kind. And here it is, as cited on Research and Market’s website.

  • $1495 for a single user (PDF)
  • $2093 for 1-5 users (PDF)
  • $2840 for 1-10 users (PDF)
  • $3588 for 1-15 (PDF)

Investigating trends and researching markets takes time, resources, and a lot of human energy. It almost always involves more than one person and there are expenses along the way for all involved. Those of us who have compiled such reports for publishers and other companies catering to consumers, distributors, and curators of books are no strangers to the process. But on behalf of all independent professionals out there who could use this information today to help them do more with ebooks (not less), I ask: is such a PDF worth $1495 for a single user? And what’s the cost of this same document for an organization of more than 15 users?

People’s and organizations’ efforts should be compensated fairly, but when we — the industry that, at its most fundamental level, is about spreading information based on research and facts — ‘value’ knowledge in a way that makes it inaccessible to all who are willing to ‘move’ the world with it, we are only contributing to keeping the world divided into those who can and those who can’t. We are also encouraging a world in which a Prada purse is ‘worth’ more simply because it costs more.

So, as the title of this post states: A new report on ebook trends is out, but its prohibitive cost makes it immediately affordable only to some.  There are a lot of organizations out there that can easily shell out a few thousand to obtain this data for their employees. And many of them are media outlets whose sole purpose is to serve this information to the consumer. But there are also those of us who want to use this information on our own terms. In our own communities. And with our own peers.

A suggestion for Research and Markets: please reconsider the cost of this and similar reports for those of us interested in using their data to promote and encourage more ebook use around the world (including countries not mentioned). For us, it’s not about p vs e. It’s about digital literacy. What sustains us (and our efforts) is the passion for the idea that ebooks can crack the world open in ways yet to be seen. For us, it’s not just reporting. It’s encouragement.

Meanwhile, we look forward to someone else’s reporting on this.

Open Access reigns in The Netherlands: De Gruyter signs license agreement with Dutch universities

logo[1]“With this agreement, De Gruyter is furthering the policy of the Dutch government, which has prioritized Open Access for the country’s universities,” says Carsten Buhr, Managing Director of De Gruyter, in the press release announcing the publisher has signed an agreement with The Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) to make Open Access articles available in DG’s hybrid journals. The portfolio available to Dutch scholars consists of 370 peer-reviewed journals.

From the press release:

The agreement covers the period from 2016 to 2018, and enables all academics that belong to an associated university to release Open Access publications through De Gruyter. As part of the agreement, the usual Article Processing Charge (APC) that is paid up front by authors is waived. This will apply only in cases where the institution has an active subscription for the journal to which the author submits an article for peer review and publication

According to the terms of the license agreement, the deducted Article Processing Charges will be reconciled with the annual subscription renewal cost for the following year.

News Roundup [June 10, 2016]

End-of-Week E-News Round-up3

Hummingbird Digital Media announced that more than 3000 publishers are now using its service to distribute ebooks and audiobooks. Hummingbird, which set out 18 months ago to “disrupt the ironclad control an oligarchy of large corporations had on the retailing of e-books and audiobooks,” is a free service for booksellers and others to directly offer their customers ebooks and audiobooks.

Author Earning Posts New Report on Big Five Ebook Pricing [Digital Book World]

Author Earnings posted a new report on ebook pricing from the Big Five publishing houses. The average price of a Big Five ebook, according to the report, dropped from $10.31 in January 2016 to $8.67 in May 2016.

Dear librarians, please don’t move away from enabling & encouraging reading [No Shelf Required]

It has come to my attention lately that librarians of all walks of life are participating in all kinds of wonderful outreach initiatives in their communities….making me ultimately conclude that, as admirable as they are, they are moving librarians away from what the society needs them to do now more than ever: encourage people to read and have as much access to quality information as humanly possible.

8 Ebook Discovery Services Compared [Alliance of Independent Authors]

Data on eight popular services comparing pricing, audience, and features to find the right platform for promoting free and discounted books. Services compared include: Freebooksy, Bargain Booksy, BookBub, BookSends, Fussy Librarian, Robin Reads, EReaderIQ, and BookGorilla. Continue reading News Roundup [June 10, 2016]

ProQuest completes digitization of rare books at Wellcome Library

Early European BooksProQuest’s Early European Books (EEB) program now includes nearly 10,000 digitized titles and more than four million pages from the Wellcome Library, the pre-eminent collection in Europe devoted to the history of medicine and related topics.

This project is part of ProQuest’s program that makes available early printed books from five major European libraries, including Danish Royal Library, the National Central Library in Florence, the National Library of the Netherlands, the National Library of France, and the Wellcome Library in London.

The rest of the press release: Continue reading ProQuest completes digitization of rare books at Wellcome Library

NSR Book of the Week: Sunborn Rising: Beneath the Fall by Aaron Safronoff

In an effort to draw attention to quality independent literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. This week’s pick:

Sunborn Rising: Beneath the Fall

About Author

Aaron SafronoffAaron Safronoff was born and raised in Michigan where he wrote his first novella, Evening Breezes. In his early twenties, he moved to California to attend culinary school. He fell in love with the Bay Area and has never considered leaving, although he did eventually leave the school to work in the games industry where he worked for 10 years. He self-published his first novel, Spire, in 2011. When he won a Discovery Award for Science Fiction in the summer of 2012, he began making plans to drop everything to write fiction fulltime. He left game design at the end of that year, and published two more novels in the following three months. Today, Safronoff is co-founder and Chief Storyteller of Neoglyphic Entertainment where he is now working on the second novel in the Sunborn Rising series.

About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

 

A librarian’s response to “Dear librarians, please don’t move away from enabling and encouraging reading”

A librarian responded to NSR Editor’s Dear librarians op-ed (asking librarians not to move away from enabling and encouraging reading) with such thoughtfulness, the comment itself deserves to be published as a stand-alone post. Thank you, F Goldsmith, for taking the time to offer a perspective that deepens everyone’s understanding, especially my own. And for writing it so coherently. And for caring enough to take the time to write it so coherently. May the dialog continue. And the learning.


Comment:

It’s good to see how cultural changes look to those who are close and yet not inside the circles where goal setting, strategic objectives, and tactics are discussed. I’m glad to see this eloquent view as it opens a way to broaden understanding.

No one, least of all you, is surprised to hear that reality is ever more complex than one perspective—and a well informed perspective—on its nuances can note without some acknowledgment of other perspectives. In the case of what truly appears to be librarians abandoning the savvy reader and experienced library user to bring services into the larger community, several factors should be noted:

Continue reading A librarian’s response to “Dear librarians, please don’t move away from enabling and encouraging reading”

Congrats Topeka & Shawnee PL for Library of the Year Award (and extensive econtent collection)

13394142_10156931554445654_1260705143126542099_n[1]Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library (TSCPL) in Kansas has been named the 2016 Library of the Year by Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, and Library Journal. The press release (below) and other news stories about the award point to the library’s exemplary engagement with its community. The library is to receive $10,000 at an ALA reception in Orlando, FL,  on June 26th.

Glancing at the library homepage makes it clear that TSCPL engages in all sorts of activities, including filling prescriptions for patrons.

Relevant to NSR readers and advocates for digital literacy: the library offers ebooks and digital content, too, including a large collection of audiobooks.  According to its web site, TSCPL provides access to thousands of ebooks and audiobooks through OverDrive, Hoopla Digital, BookFlix, and TumbleBooks for Kids.  Its econtent offerings also include videos, music, and magazines.

The library’s top 10 research databases include:

  • Auto Repair Reference Center
  • Consumer Reports
  • Academic Search Premier
  • American Obituaries
  • Business Search Premier
  • Health Source
  • Mango for Libraries
  • Masterfile Premier
  • Novelist
  • Ancestry Library Edition

Continue reading Congrats Topeka & Shawnee PL for Library of the Year Award (and extensive econtent collection)

Portal on all things ebooks and econtent and for all reading, writing, publishing, curating, and distributing books and other content in digital format, including publishers, librarians, content developers, distributors, retailers, and educators. Managed and edited by Mirela Roncevic, with contributions from professionals and thought leaders in the United States and around the world.