NC LIVE Partners with Credo to provide users with a research tool to combat fake news

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Conducting research in the 21st century often means navigating fake news sites, biased media, and contradictory online information. Information literacy has emerged as a critical skill to achieve academic, professional, and personal success. Thanks to a partnership between the state’s library consortium NC LIVE and Credo Reference, Credo Online Reference Service will offer North Carolinians a starting point to find information about their research or personal topics of interest.

Credo provides background knowledge, illustrates relationships between topics, and cites the information they provide simply and consistently. North Carolinians won’t need to worry that what they are reading is bogus. Continue reading NC LIVE Partners with Credo to provide users with a research tool to combat fake news

Book of the Week: Androgen Deficiency in the Adult Male (Prof. Malcolm Carruthers)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week, including a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

Androgen Deficiency in the Adult Male: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Founder and chief medical consultant to the Centre for Men’s Health with clinics in London, Manchester, and Edinburgh, Prof. Malcolm Carruthers is a highly respected men’s health specialist and world authority on testosterone deficiency. He is adjunct professor at the Alzheimer’s and Aging Department in Edith Cowan University, Western Australia. Having spent over thirty years in diagnosing and treating androgen deficiency, he has extensive knowledge of the practical clinical measures needed for its treatment as well as the background theoretical information on which that is based.  Alongside over 120 refereed papers in medical journals and editorials in the American Heart Journal and the Lancet, he is the author of nine other books.

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

De Gruyter will digitize the entirety of its backlist. All the way back to 1749.

De Gruyter has taken the decision to digitize the entirety of its backlist all the way back to 1749. The decision to make this significant investment to complete the prestigious archive was taken earlier this year and the digitization process will begin shortly.

Many treasures are among works to be digitized, including Noam Chomsky’s “Syntactic Structures” as well as versions of “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” to name but two. The project is expected to conclude in 2020 with 3,000 additional titles to be available by the end of 2017. Of those titles digitized during the rest of this year, up to one hundred of the most important series will have priority, to allow librarians to complete their holdings. Continue reading De Gruyter will digitize the entirety of its backlist. All the way back to 1749.

Who’s Testing Listening Comprehension?

With the new K-12 school year under way or on the verge, American elementary and middle school administrators are focused on “proving” that the kids in their districts are learning or “know” how to read. Several corporate entrepreneurs are on board to continue to make money through mass, data-driven program packages that administrators buy as a demonstration that care is being taken to “prove” kids are able to think about what they read. Lexile® leveling and Renaissance’s Accelerated Reading programs are probably the ones most commonly recognized both by families and library staff who are regularly asked to find books that respond to company profiles created of their students.

Individual student Lexile assessments are drawn from state testing results. The circularity is obvious and is discussed at length and critically in scholarly and popular publications. Renaissance’s Star Reading™ assessments are presented as “guiding” developing readers through increased skill levels by diagnosing their readiness through prepackaged tests. This approach, of course, has, like Lexiling, its proponents, as well as an increasingly voluble number of professional detractors. Continue reading Who’s Testing Listening Comprehension?

This week in Literature and Arts

August 28, 1978: John Huston, 81, dies of pneumonia linked to a variety of heart and lung ailments associated with heavy smoking.

A remarkably talented man, who, by numerous accounts, also was a real son of a bitch.


Continue reading This week in Literature and Arts

No better time for teachers and librarians to introduce teenagers to self-publishing than now

We live in an age in which the resources necessary to self-publish are readily available. Many adults self-publish their books and see them distributed to online retailers and libraries. Some libraries are beginning to facilitate this, especially with seniors who are memoirists, but what of students? What of adolescents whose hearts are filled with passion for life and who need to express their thoughts and feelings, to know that their words can find readers, and that their ideas matter to others? Now, thanks to Smashwords with its technology and how-to guides, educators and librarians can help these young people find their voices and speak to the world.

I send a big thanks to Tonya McQuade, poet, teacher and pioneer in both ebook publishing and in educational leadership.  Tonya McQuade began writing poetry as a child. She has won awards for it, published a book of her own writings, and appeared in anthologies. She has taught high school English for over 20 years. But in 2014, she found herself inspired her to go into self-publishing with her students. Continue reading No better time for teachers and librarians to introduce teenagers to self-publishing than now

Odilo celebrates back-to-school season with the addition of Sesame Street titles

ODILO is celebrating the back-to-school season with a collection from their newest publisher, Sesame Workshop.

ODILO’s  eBook platform, content, and flexible lending models (One-Copy/One-User, Pay-per-Use, Simultaneous, and Subscription) help schools and libraries better serve their students, educators, and families. With a strong international presence, ODILO’s marketplace offers over one million titles in multiple languages from more than 3,500 publishers; subjects range from popular fiction and nonfiction to educational titles. Continue reading Odilo celebrates back-to-school season with the addition of Sesame Street titles

Book of the Week: City of Ghosts (J.H. Moncrieff)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week, including a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

City of Ghosts

J.H. Moncrieff’s work has been described by reviewers as early Gillian Flynn with a little Ray Bradbury and Stephen King thrown in for good measure. She won Harlequin’s search for “the next Gillian Flynn” in 2016. When not writing, she loves exploring the world’s most haunted places, advocating for animal rights, and summoning her inner ninja in muay thai class. Continue reading Book of the Week: City of Ghosts (J.H. Moncrieff)

When teachers forget how to listen

With the new American school year either poised to open or already entering its fifth or sixth day (depending on local practices), many classrooms are hearing the voice of just one of the room’s occupants. Teachers need to manage both their students’ learning opportunities and their interactive behaviors and, most typically, this is achieved in the 21st century by word of mouth: orally delivered directions, admonitions, and that warning shot of calling out a particular student by name.

Or calling out some syllables that the teacher is has decided suits the need for a name as well as does the actual name of the student. In the multilingual, multiethnic classrooms—and even in the comparatively homogenous one in which not everyone bears a three- to five-letter moniker shared by generations of English speakers—the expert in what to call the students isn’t the teacher. The wise would-be classroom manager simply asks. And then listens to what the student with eleven syllables and only four consonants pronounces.

Continue reading When teachers forget how to listen

Alexander Street collaborates with indie film distributors to launch a new film collection for libraries

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Alexandria, VA – Indie films are synonymous with compelling viewpoints on historical events, insights into our current world, and innovative story-telling. Beyond that, they offer critical insights and profound perspectives on the human experience providing a new level of engagement for students with their classroom content.

Independent World Cinema: Classic and Contemporary Film, a new film collection from Alexander Street, a ProQuest company, provides streaming access to over 400 independent films essential for film studies, media studies and theater students. The films support research and learning in these fields yet have a wide range of applicability reaching as far as psychology, gender studies, and anthropology. Students will gain new insight and perspectives into their field in a format that they depend upon often—video. Continue reading Alexander Street collaborates with indie film distributors to launch a new film collection for libraries

Smashwords, libraries, and the [new] culture of authorship

Libraries have traditionally promoted a culture of learning and a culture of books. Now they have the opportunity to promote a culture of authorship. — Mark Coker, founder of Smashwords

In our time, late in the second decade of the 21st century, libraries have an opportunity to not only continue their traditional mission of providing books and encouraging literacy, but of extending that tradition into a new world of library-based publishing in which the library grows beyond being the locus of literacy in its community and transforms itself into the champion of the creative force of authorship.

As I have been writing these articles on Indies in the Library™, the word “Smashwords” keeps coming up. Especially, as I wrote the last article, about educating indie authors on how to work with libraries, I realized that the Smashwords’ technology and distribution platform solves two of the largest barriers to libraries acquiring indie ebooks: putting the books into library distribution channels and getting them into ebook platforms that patrons are already comfortable with. I wanted to talk with the person who had the vision to create this.

Kat Brooks of IndiesUnlimited knows Mark Coker, founder of Smashwords, and was kind enough to make an email introduction. Mark and I then managed to schedule a phone call. He has a very busy schedule speaking, not only at writers’ conferences, but at library conferences and even at individual libraries that are developing their programs to work with indie authors. I was eager to hear his thoughts on indie publishing and on the future of publishing and libraries. Continue reading Smashwords, libraries, and the [new] culture of authorship

Introducing Free Reading Zones to Brazilian librarians and publishers

NSR’s Mirela Roncevic, who launched the Free to Read initiative in 2016 and orchestrated the world’s first attempt to turn an entire country into a Free Reading Zone, will speak at the 10th International Seminar of Public and Community Libraries in Sao Paolo this coming October, with the goal of encouraging and inspiring librarians across Brazil to implement Free Reading Zones (in cooperation with publishers, technology companies, and private and government sponsors).

Since turning Croatia into a Free Reading Zone in December 2016 (read more about this No Shelf Required pilot here), Roncevic has been speaking publicly at a number of conferences about Free Reading Zones and the project’s potential to transform how books and knowledge are accessed inside and outside libraries and institutions. The goal and mission of the project is to celebrate the potential of digital books (and digital content in general) to equalize access to knowledge (in ways not seen before) and afford new opportunities for all in the book ecosystem, including librarians, publishers, educators, and readers. Continue reading Introducing Free Reading Zones to Brazilian librarians and publishers

Book of the Week: Terminal Rage (A.M. Khalifa)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week, including a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

Terminal Rage

A.M. Khalifa is a critically acclaimed author based between Rome and Los Angeles. He writes up-market political thrillers and literary fiction focusing on niche international stories that breach cultural taboos and provoke dialogue on sensitive issues. Having lived, worked or studied in over 15 countries, Khalifa is fluent in four languages.

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Expressions, Impressions

Just as authored, edited, and mass produced books comprise only one segment of the to-be-read universe, audiobooks are not alone in what we can read by ear. We’ve long tuned into broadcast events—live sports, journalists’ reports, opinions and performances—and we negotiate our daily public lives as much by attending to ambient aural messages as to signs and written directions.

With digital preservation and dissemination broadening its capacious notice of aural resources, there is a growing wealth of sound archives that carry “reader” content. The Quietus (http://thequietus.com) offers a fine point of entry into this world of expressive sounds. Earlier this month, the site launched an interactive archives of contemporary Protest Sound. Take a journey on your own, or include this in lower and upper division political science course curricula. Protest & Politics (http://citiesandmemory.com/protest/) gives access to international expressions of government dissent, with the ability to key sound to geography, and a tutorial on different forms of protest. Specific tracks recorded at protest events vary in length and most are long enough to give listeners contextual sounds as a bed for the intentional messaging. Continue reading Expressions, Impressions

This week in Literature and Arts

Happy birthday to Alfred Hitchcock, born August 13, 1899, in London. His films are still so much fun to watch.


August 15, 1965: Performing at Shea Stadium in Queens, NY, The Beatles set another precedent as the first band to play a sports arena.


August 16, 1977: Elvis Presley dies at 42 with enough fat in his arteries to grease a train, and the drugs in his blood would fuel a Grateful Dead tour.

“Like no one before, he let out a roar, and I just had to tag along.

Each night I went to bed with the sound in my head, and the dream was a song.

Big Train from Memphis, Big Train from Memphis,

Now it’s gone gone gone, gone gone gone.”

—John Fogerty, “Big Train (From Memphis)”

Hail to The King, baby!


Continue reading This week in Literature and Arts

Major plays and musicals come to Alexander Street

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Alexandria, VA (August, 2017) – Now students and researchers can be immersed in the work of award-winning writers, actors and directors in action, whenever and wherever they are. BroadwayHD is one of the most important distributors of current Broadway plays and musicals – distributed exclusively to libraries via the Alexander Street™ platform.

An essential collection for students and researchers of the performing arts, The BroadwayHD Collection provides a unique pathway to uncovering critical insights only available from experiencing live performance. Encompassing 25 award-winning live Broadway plays and musicals featuring such luminaries as James Earl Jones, Jane Krakowski, Ed Harris, Jennifer Garner and Kevin Kline, this content is exclusively available from Alexander Street for worldwide educational streaming. Curated especially for performing arts scholars, The BroadwayHD Collection is also invaluable for studies in drama, music, dance and literature. Continue reading Major plays and musicals come to Alexander Street

ODILO chosen by European Commission to help boost literacy in schools

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Denver, CO, August 15, 2017 – ODILO, a global leader in the eBook industry, has been selected by the European Commission to provide their digital reading platform to European schools and universities.

Improving literacy and reading comprehension in schools has become one of the main challenges across Europe. With the support from the Commission, ODILO can now provide innovative and affordable solutions to assist schools and universities in their own reading plan implementations. Continue reading ODILO chosen by European Commission to help boost literacy in schools

This week in Literature and Arts

August 7, 1934: The U.S. Court of Appeals upholds the lower court’s ruling that James Joyce’s novel Ulysses is art, not pornography, and eligible for sale in the United States.


August 8, 1969: At roughly 11:30 a.m. as a constable held traffic, photographer Iain Macmillan climbed a stepladder, focused his Hasselbad camera’s 50 mm lens closed down the aperture to f22 for great depth, and firing the shutter at 1/500th of a second shot six pictures of The Beatles walking away from EMI Studios crossing Abbey Road. The fifth exposure became the album cover.

Linda McCartney on the sidelines shot her own pix of the event.


Continue reading This week in Literature and Arts

Welcome, local author. Your public library wants you!

As the indie author revolution grows, more and more libraries are providing services to them. Many libraries have extensive information on their websites. Pike’s Peak Library District sets an excellent example at https://ppld.org/local-authors. But, what do you do when an indie author/aspiring writer walks in the door and needs something he or she can carry home with them?

Many indie authors are first-time writers, especially those who write memoirs. They may be of retirement age and somewhat uncomfortable with technology. For instance, they would rather you give them information in printed form than refer them to your website. They may have an ebook edition of their book, but they paid someone to create it for them, and they do not understand library ebook purchasing procedures. They didn’t know your library had services for them, and you need something to give them so they can begin learning about the services.

Continue reading Welcome, local author. Your public library wants you!

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