New articles of interest

Here’s one in the NYT – Cell Phone Apps Challenge the Rise of eReaders

Publishing Point meeting with Michael Healy, Executive Director, Book Rights Registry

Trial of e-textbook business models to start in UK

Samuelson Says She Has Same Pricing, Privacy Concerns About Google Settlement – 11/18/2009 – Library Journal

E-books go to college, but books still rule the campus, not Kindle — DailyFinance

Universities Boycott Amazon’s Kindle DX

Press Review+: Google Book Search Revised Settlement (2.0) Released; What About Libraries? « ResourceShelf

4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

Here is another blog post from Sylvia Miller, Director of “Publishing the Civil Rights Movement” at the University of North Carolina Press, summarizing a Charleston Conference presentation.  It is reprinted with permission.  (Thanks Sylvia, you are making my job easy!)

At the Charleston Conference, I attended an all-day preconference workshop on e-books organized by Sue Polanka of Wright State University (who runs the blog No Shelf Required), Carolyn Morris of Coutts Information Services, and Janet Fischer of Publishers Communication Group, Inc. I was especially impressed with the final talk of the day, given by Anh Bui of HighWire Press, Stanford University–probably because she said things that support the ideas in our Long Civil Rights Movement online pilot!
Continue reading 4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar summary

I attended the eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar today.  My notes (done real time, please excuse typos) are below.

Speakers:  SarahRotman Epps, Forrester Analyst and Michael Smith, IDPF Executive Director Continue reading eBook Readers and Standards, where to next? webinar summary

ebrary offers free H1N1 database

From an ebrary press release:

ebrary Launches Free H1N1 (Influenza) Searchable Information Center

New Site Makes PDF Documents from Government Agencies and Other Authoritative Sources More Discoverable

November 16, 2009 – Palo Alto, CA, USA –  ebrary®, a leading provider of digital content products and technologies, today announced that it has created a publicly available research center featuring a highly interactive, searchable database of documents pertaining to the H1N1 influenza pandemic.  Available today at http://h1n1.ebrary.com, the new site contains a growing selection of reports, papers, newsletters, posters, and other important materials from government agencies and other trusted sources.

Continue reading ebrary offers free H1N1 database

New articles of interest

Time and Tools Are Ripe for On-Demand Acquisitions, Say Charleston Speakers – 11/12/2009 – Library Journal

Revised Google Book Settlement presented to the Court: Limited to U.S., Canada, Australia, U.K.

The End of Single-Purpose Devices

Barnes & Noble Nook Pre-Orders Exceed Expectations

Study: In Downturn, Academic Libraries To Focus on Value, ROI – 11/5/2009 – Library Journal


The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

The following summary of the Charleston Conference was written by Sylvia Miller from the University of North Carolina Press, and author of “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement” blog.  It is reposted with permission

Trains and battleships were two of the most telling metaphors that presenters at last week’s Charleston Conference used in their attempt to describe the strength, speed, and scariness of the changes currently taking place in academic librarianship and scholarly publishing.  The news media and press outlets that focus on education and publishing seem to regard 2009 as a tipping point for public acceptance and business success of e-books.   The speakers at this conference attended by 1,000 academic librarians and scholarly publishers clearly recognized that this enormous change is upon us.

In a talk entitled “I Hear the Train A Comin’”  Kevin Guthrie, President of Ithaka, asked, “When the tracks and the cars come up to everyone’s door, what happens to the beautiful old train station?”  He was of course referring to the impact of the Web on libraries, many of which may no longer be needed as physical repositories of content duplicated down the street, across town, and online.

Responding to this year’s conference theme “Necessity Is the Mother of Invention,” several speakers urged librarians to act quickly and strongly for positive change.   Ivy Anderson of the California Digital Library said that reorienting libraries toward the future was “like turning a battleship around.”  In an inspiring keynote speech, David Lankes of the Information Institute of Syracuse memorably referred to the dubious efficacy of “conducting exit interviews on the deck of the Titanic“!

Lankes urged librarians to recognize their mission “to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities” and become innovative, proactive leaders.  When I described the speech to a colleague here at UNC Press, she immediately said, “That could also apply to publishers!”  I told her that in fact the first audience member to comment during the Q&A session said exactly that.  In another plenary speech, Douglas Armato of the University of Minnesota Press concluded, speaking of libraries and publishers, “If we’re not dealing with this evolution together, we should be.”
Continue reading The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

Credo Reference announces SAGE Reference Publisher Collection

From a Credo Press Release:

A significant majority of SAGE Reference titles to be available through Credo

Boston and Oxford, (November 3, 2009) – Credo Reference, the award-winning online reference library, has signed an agreement to launch a SAGE Reference Publisher Collection. Nearly 70 SAGE Reference titles will now be available through the acclaimed Credo Reference platform. Continue reading Credo Reference announces SAGE Reference Publisher Collection

Big news in online reference

I’ve gotten a flurry of press releases in the past 2 weeks from a variety of reference publishers.  Some are offering mobile search, others are teaming up to distribute content, or they are offering new products.  Here’s a sampling of what’s going on (in no apparent order):

  • Oxford University Press launched Oxford Handbooks Online
  • SAGE Reference is making nearly 70 of their top Social Science encyclopedias available in Credo Reference
  • Alexander Street Press announced the streaming music and video collections are going mobile in 2010
  • EBSCO Publishing announced the “going mobile” version of EBSCO host
  • Facts on File (Infobase Publishing) launched a new curriculum video on demand subscription service
  • Rosen and Gale have teamed up to distribute one anothers online health resources – Rosen’s Teen Health & Wellness and Gale’s Health & Wellness Resource Center
  • Gale’s Powersearch and InfoTrac now support the MLA 7 format

More ebook preconference presentations – Discoverability and Visability

Charleston Conference – eBooks, Not just another binding preconference

Increasing the discoverability of ebooks means making sure they are easy to find when users are looking for them. Increasing the visibility means placing them in the user’s workflow even when they aren’t actively looking for them. Both initiatives are vital when placing books online. In this session we’ll discuss the issues surrounding the discoverability and visibility of ebooks, focusing on the academic, research, and clinical areas.

Anh Bui, Executive Publication Manager, Books Products, HighWire Press –Bui presentation

Portal on all things ebooks and econtent and for all reading, writing, publishing, curating, and distributing books and other content in digital format, including publishers, librarians, content developers, distributors, retailers, and educators. Managed and edited by Mirela Roncevic, with contributions from professionals and thought leaders in the United States and around the world.