Removing print books meets resistance in academic libraries

Interesting article on E-Library Economics in Inside Higher Education.  Discussion surrounds Syracuse University’s plan for a more digital library and transformation of the physical library to student study space, which met with resistance from faculty and students.  The author, Steve Kolowich, sites various studies on the economics of digital libraries and the design of the future library.  “Taken together, these studies point to twin conclusions: The sooner professors and students embrace e-books, the sooner their libraries can start saving money — but that might not happen for a while.”  Kolowich goes on to discuss issues with eBooks, eReaders, and standard formats like EPUB.

College Bookstores to add Espresso Book Machines

Expect to find print on demand textbooks and other academic and trade titles available for POD in college bookstores very soon.  From a press release, “NACS Media Solutions (NMS), a
subsidiary of the National Association of College Stores (NACS) and On Demand Books LLC (ODB), the maker of the Espresso Book Machine® (EBM), have entered into a joint agreement
whereby NMS will market the EBM to the collegiate marketplace and permission academic content for distribution throughout the worldwide network of EBMs.”  No word on pricing.  Thanks to Teleread for the info.

Macmillan CEO open to new business models with libraries

Eric Hellman, moderator of the Go To Hellman blog, attended the Publishing Point Meetup Group in NYC and posted a summary of comments from Macmillan CEO, John Sargent.  Sargent stated he is open to new business models with libraries going so far as to say, “If there is a model where the publisher gets a piece of the action every time the book is borrowed, that’s an interesting model.” Hellman recommends that, “Now is the time for publishers and libraries to sit down together and develop new models for working together in the ebook economy. Executives like John Sargent are not afraid of change, but they need to better understand the ways that they can benefit from working with libraries on ebook business models. Libraries need to recognize the need for change and work with publishers to build mutually beneficial business models that don’t pretend that ebooks are the same as print.”

Interview with Frances Pinter, Publisher at Bloomsbury Academic

I had a great discussion with Dr. Frances Pinter, Publisher at Bloomsbury Academic yesterday.  Frances was one of the keynote speakers at the TOC Conference.  She spoke about the future of academic monograph publishing in her keynote and again in our interview yesterday.  Frances has some really out-of-the-box ideas, it’s definitely worth a listen. To view her keynote at TOC, visit YouTube.

Her interview, and many others, are available on the NSR interviews page.

Librarians speak up about Ebooks – HighWire Press Survey Results

It’s a popular day for releasing survey results it seems.  Earlier we got Aptara’s results from a publisher survey on eBooks and now HighWire has released a survey on eBooks based on librarian input.  The result are in the full report.

According to HighWire, the report espouses some familiar and consistent themes:

  • Simplicity and ease of use seem more important than sophisticated end-user features.
  • Users tend to discover ebooks through both the library catalog and search engines.
  • While users prefer PDFs, format preference will likely change as technology changes.
  • DRM seems to hinder ebook use for library patrons; ability to print is essential.
  • The most popular business model for librarians is purchase with perpetual access.

Publishers speak up about eBooks – Aptara Survey Results

Aptara just released the results of a survey to more than 300 publishers about eBooks.  The three most insightful results according to Aptara are:

  • Those who are publishing eBooks are forgoing substantial revenue by vastly limiting their potential readership
  • most publishers are using their own eCommerce sites and not taking advantage of major distribution channels that provide access to the largest available audiences of digitally savvy consumers most publishers are creating
  • eBooks that cannot be read on most mobile devices

10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Earlier this week I attended the O’Reilly Tools of Change (TOC) Conference for the first time.  Over 1250 attendees gathered in New York City to discuss and network   about issues and trends in publishing, in particular, digital publishing.  While much of the information presented was for the publishing industry, I did manage to find several great ideas and concepts that relate to libraries.  I’d like to share these with you, in no apparent order. Continue reading 10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

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