General Interest

When ebooks are ‘free’ through libraries for two weeks (like Harry Potter)

We learned last week that Pottermore will make J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone ebook available to UK library users for two weeks in order to celebrate the 20th anniversary of its publication. The ebook will be available through library distribution apps OverDrive, BorrowBox from Bolinda and Askews & Holts from 26th June until July 9th. During that time, the U.K. library system (which signed an agreement with Pottermore) will offer unlimited number of loans to the first book in the massively popular series.

We also learned that Pottermore is supplying participating libraries with posters, flyers, social media materials and competition ideas to help them publicize the free loans (as they are called) and, in essence, help publicize the book and the series in digital format.

Those of us who have worked with ebook vendors and engaged publishers (big and small) to consider alternative ebook business models (for consumers and especially for libraries) have long been aware of the resistance on the part of established, traditional publishing houses to expose their content digitally in ways other than through the one copy-one user model.

So when a publisher such as Pottermore decides to provide a Harry Potter title in ebook format through a library in ‘unlimited’ ways (which means no restrictions are placed on how many readers can read at the same time during those a two-week period, and only during that period), the first reaction is certainly one filled with hope that a new trend may be on the horizon showing signs that publishers hesitant to embrace less-restrictive ebook models in libraries are embracing innovation by making some bold moves with digital books. What’s more, some are touting this move as a great way to ‘support’ public libraries in the U.K., which have been struggling. The second reaction, however, is one of hesitation. Continue reading When ebooks are ‘free’ through libraries for two weeks (like Harry Potter)

Reading by Ear: A superb collection of articles on audiobooks, audio literacy, and the art of listening

A few months ago, NSR launched the Reading by Ear column, written by audiobook and audio literacy authority, librarian Francisca Goldsmith. The column discusses audiobooks as a medium through which contemporary readers are invited to explore literary culture, performance arts, and multimodal literacy capacity building. In her thought-provoking, scholarly yet accessible writing, Francisca addresses why audiobook listening expands, rather than derails, our access to literature and the written word. She also takes on the issue of prescribing audiobooks as a ‘print reading’ support versus listening to audiobooks as a way to build information and aesthetic experiences and critical thinking about auditory experiences in their own right.

Francisca has been working in libraries for many years. Her professional background includes services and collections for teens in public and school libraries, for New Americans, and providing reference services and managing collections for adults and teens. Her contribution to No Shelf Required is immense and we are grateful to have her on board. Continue reading Reading by Ear: A superb collection of articles on audiobooks, audio literacy, and the art of listening

Show a teen how to build a summer listening library

This Thursday heralds opening day for the 8th season of AudiobookSYNC Audiobooks for Teens. Here’s an opportunity to acquire 32 audiobooks for free and to keep for personal use (not for library collections). All comers are granted each week’s pair of free audiobooks, while the program selections target middle and high school aged teens. Last year, the program provided more than 170,000 free audiobook downloads of 30 titles.

What it is: AudiobookSYNC aims to highlight listening as a means to reading both high teen-interest titles and titles either assigned for summer reading or likely to require student attention for curriculum support. The audiobook review magazine AudioFile, hosts the annual program, uses the OverDrive app and computer software for distribution, and acquires its titles through donations from more than a dozen audiobook publishers, including the big guys like Penguin Random House and Recorded Books, and smaller houses like L.A. Theatre Works, Ideal Audiobooks, and Naxos AudioBooks. Continue reading Show a teen how to build a summer listening library

Speeding kills

Ten days ago Quartz published a piece associating America’s “unhealthy obsession with productivity with the rise in audiobook publishing and market popularity. The article puts forward relatively ancient survey data, claiming that the 2006 Audio Publishers Association’s consumer survey is the latest. It’s not and a very quick search of the same site the author used to locate this report leads to 2012 survey results, posted in 2013, and a n online search that takes all of one minute longer leads directly to the Edison Research audiobook consumer research report of 2016.

That not-minor quibble aside, the Quartz writer goes on to characterize audiobook readers as “book lovers in a hurry” and notes the availability of proprietary technologies that “speed listen,” altering the audiobook’s playback by eliminating intentional pauses in the performance’s recording and even tripling the speed of the cadences chosen by narrators and directors. At this point, the writer is no longer really discussing audiobook listening; instead, the subject is the avoidance of listening, and, thereby, the avoidance of actually falling into the audiobook. Continue reading Speeding kills

Not all libraries are created equal. What would the world be if they were?

According to an article I recently read in the New York Times, Merryl H. Tisch, the former chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents, and her husband, James S. Tisch, the president and chief executive of Lowes Corporation (who sits on the New York Public Library’s board of directors) will give  20 million dollars to the New York Public Library (NYPL) to “expand and strengthen its education programming, from early literacy classes to technology training.”

The article goes on to explain that owing to this gift, a new position for a director of education will be created and Tisch added that she hoped the money would help the library create more job training courses and other programs to help expose students to the library’s rich collection of resources. Christopher Platt, the chief branch library officer, is also quoted saying that, to his knowledge, “this is the first educational gift to public libraries of this scale in the country.”

Giving money—especially large amounts of money that can make a lasting impact—to support any organization and institution on a mission to promote literacy, education, and access to knowledge is admirable on every level, yet this article (and story) has left me with unsettling thoughts that I wish to share here, in hopes they are not misunderstood or taken out of context. And these are pervasive thoughts, similar to those I have often expressed on NSR in my effort to draw attention to unequal access to knowledge and books permeating our society. Continue reading Not all libraries are created equal. What would the world be if they were?

Leanpub Podcast Interview with Mirela Roncevic on Free Reading Zones and her vision of the future (for books)

A few weeks ago, NSR Director Mirela Roncevic talked with Leanpub about her Free Reading Zones efforts and explained the experience of turning an entire country into an open virtual library as a way of showing the potential of ebooks and digital content to democratize the written word, transform the publishing industry, and envision a future in which libraries serve people beyond the confines of their buildings and assigned zip codes. She has written about it in her Lessons from Croatia Reads series on NSR (the  Sponsor of the countrywide initiative in Croatia to spread free reading) and is in the midst of writing a lengthy case study/report on the project, to be published by ALA later in 2017.

This is the most revealing (audio) interview on the project thusfar, in which she sheds light on the challenges she and her team encountered and why she believes the future of reading will look radically different than it does today.

Excerpt:

Len: I was wondering if you could talk, just for a few minutes, about your current vision. I mean, of course, there will still be experiments, but what is your vision of a global open virtual library? How would it work? Would it have a sort of single, central administration or?

Mirela: I have visions of it. Somebody asked me in an interview, “What is the ultimate Free Reading Zone?”  And I answered, “Oh, the entire world is the ultimate Free Reading Zone.” Not a particular country.

But I do think that for many, many reasons, we have ways to go to get there. It’s not going to happen overnight. It’s probably not going to happen in my lifetime. Continue reading Leanpub Podcast Interview with Mirela Roncevic on Free Reading Zones and her vision of the future (for books)

NSR invites publishers and vendors to support EveryLibrary’s efforts to protect libraries

every library

EveryLibrary—a nonprofit social welfare organization chartered to work on local library ballot initiatives and the only national organization dedicated to political action at a local level to create and protect public funding for libraries—has just put out a statement to all who support its mission to fight for the future of libraries to join its efforts by pledging support.

As part of its efforts, EveryLibrary is working to roll-out a coalition strategy in 2017 that looks to expand, not shrink, library budgets, even in the current political climate. As part of its coalition strategy, EveryLibrary signed on to the One America Coalition to focus on a core part of libraries: services to immigrants and new Americans. In addition, EveryLibrary has been part of a coalition protecting Net Neutrality for over two years and next month it will announce an expansion of its voter registration and ballot access mission.

This is a good opportunity for publishers and vendors working with libraries—public, school, and academic—to consider making a donation to support EveryLibrary’s mission. Efforts like these should serve as a reminder to publishers and vendors that sell to libraries—and whose businesses thrive from their relationship with libraries—that libraries continue to face serious challenges with funding and their livelihood depends on the continued support from the public.

Individual contributions are always welcome and make a difference, but organizational contributions have the potential to make the deepest impact. Hence this post.

More information on EveryLibrary’s 2017 agenda is available here.

Wanna write (to make a difference)?

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Friends and colleagues, I have marched into 2017 eager to continue using No Shelf Required as the ultimate outlet of expression for all who advocate free reading and support projects and initiatives that get us a little closer to that world in which we all have equal access to knowledge and the written word. That world in which knowledge flows freely in all directions to all who want and need it — on their own terms (not the terms of those who think they ‘own’ it).

I am in the process of recruiting various contributors (some of whom will become regular columnists) to write about the ways in which we can ALL do our part in making the world a slightly better place by making it possible for people everywhere to read and learn how and when they want to. And not just read and learn, but also write, listen, teach, and watch. Those of us who have the privilege of working with books and other media (this includes writers, editors, teachers, educators, librarians, and publishers, among others) have that responsibility, I believe.

So join me. Let’s put our heads together and educate each other. No shelf is required, but passion is mandatory. Email me at mirelaroncevic@gmail.com with ideas. Start date: NOW.

MR

News Roundup [October 7]

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Watching Pirate Streams Isn’t Illegal, EU Commission Argues (Torrent Freak)

Google experiments with book discovery…and fails (The Average Joe)

Amazon Removes Titles from Kindle Unlimited in Japan, and No One Knows Why (The Digital Reader)

New Research Article: “Is the Digital Talking Book Program Meeting Librarian and Patron Expectations?” (Infodocket)

More Than 500,000 Books From Benson Latin American Collection (U. of Texas Libraries) Now Available via HathiTrust (Infodocket)

Comixology Is Starting Its Own Line of Exclusive Comics (io9)

First Book Partners with Reading Rainbow to Offer Acclaimed Skybrary to Educators Serving Kids in Need (PR Newswire)

‘Spoken Editions’ Section Makes Official Debut on iTunes (Macstories)

Amazon is Now Collecting 15% Tax on eBooks Sold in New Zealand (The Digital Reader)

TeleRead, the world’s oldest ebook news and views site, makes the Library of Congress Web archives (Teleread)

Kindle Unlimited a Victim of Its own Success in Japan? (The Digital Reader)

Hachette Audio Partners with Booktrack on YA Audiobooks (Digital Book World)

Bowker Now Cites at Least 625,327 US Indie Books Published in 2015  (Publishing Perspectives)

Amazon introduces Prime Reading…and hits a sweet spot for many consumers (I Love My Kindle)

Smashwords Enhances Coupon Manager Tool (Digital Book World)

Introducing Prime Reading – The Newest Benefit for Prime Members (Amazon)

New York Public Library Digitizes 137 Years of New York City Directories (Library Stuff)

E-Book Retail Platform Offers Choice of Watermarking or DRM (Copyright and Technology)

ProQuest Makes English Book Archive Available for Japanese Researchers (InfoToday)

News Roundup [September 23, 2016]

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How a café in Croatia became an open virtual library (and what it teaches us about the future of books) (No Shelf Required)

Kindle Unlimited Funding Increases Slightly in August 2016 (The Digital Reader)

Research Tools: USDA Releases New Database with Nutrition Info For Over 80,000 Brand Name Food Products (Infodocket)

Kobo Aura 2016 vs. Kobo Glo HD vs. Kindle Paperwhite (comparison) (Password Incorrect)

The Kindle Reading Fund will make books more accessible around the world (Ebook Friendly)

Creative Commons licenses under scrutiny—what does “noncommercial” mean? (Ars Technica)

Download our new #Frankfurt @Book_Fair preview magazine free (Publishing Perspectives)

2016 Trend Report: What publishers need to know (The Average Joe)

Copyright Is Not an Inevitable or Divine Right, Court Rules (Torrent Freak)

e-Book Cover Design Awards, August 2016 (The Book Designer)

Comic Book Readers Still Prefer Print Over Digital (InfoDocket)

Facebook begins using artificial intelligence to describe photos to blind users (The Verge)

NSR Post: A time to soar above the level plain of tradition (No Shelf Required)

New Partnership between EBSCO and Mackin Makes Accessing eBooks Easier for Schools (Library Stuff)

Google Books will now make better suggestions on what to read next (Techcrunch)

Former Disney Digital Boss Says He “Loves Piracy” (Torrent Freak)

Keio University Offers “Introduction to Japanese Subcultures Post-1970” Online Course For Free (Crunchyroll)

Stop Piracy? Legal Alternatives Beat Legal Threats, Research Shows (Torrent Freak)

Students and universities set to reap the benefits of market-leading e-book pilot (JISC)

Aberystwyth University share their digital storytelling experiences (JISC)

News Roundup [September 9, 2016]

News Roundup

Every Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) and ebook supporters keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their organizations, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture. Here’s the thinking behind what we choose to highlight. Enjoy this week’s compilation.
New York: “Queens Library Launches Digital Archives” (Infodocket)

Preview ICER 2016:Ebooks Design-Based Research & Replications in Assessment & Cognitive Load Studies,by @guzdial (Computing Education Blog)

How to add fonts to the Aura One or other Kobo ereaders: Why won’t Amazon let us do this? (Teleread)

Major Publishers are hurting. It’s easy to see why: (Hugh Howey)

eBook pricing resembles three dimensional chess (Idealog)

Reabble is an RSS Feed Reader for Your Kindle (The Digital Reader)

BookShout and T-Mobile Partner to Distribute 237,000 Ebooks (The Digital Reader)

A Return to Print? Not Exactly (Bloomberg)

Whale Math: If Reasonable eBook Prices Devalue Books, Then What About This? (The Digital Reader)

New report by Bowker: Self-Publishing in the United States, 2010-2015, Print and Ebook (Bowker)

Start Saying Goodbye to eBook Pagination (Go to Hellman)

Kobo, OverDrive Post Instructions on How to Use Library eBooks on the Aura One (The Digital Reader)

BookShout Partners With T-Mobile to Distribute 237,000 eBooks (The Digital Reader)

Survey on E-Book DRM Licensing (Copyright and Technology)

Why PRH Sold Author Solutions: Business Dropped by a Quarter in 2015 (The Digital Reader)

Colleges making up English and maths GCSE shortfall given lifeline with free e-books (JISC)

Why the Hammer Museum’s new free digital archives are a game changer (Library Stuff)


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to books and all things creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

News Roundup [August 26, 2016]

News Roundup

Every Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their organizations, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture. Here’s the thinking behind what we choose to highlight. Enjoy this week’s compilation.

Three Reading Revolutions (No Shelf Required)

U. of Michigan’s Art, Architecture and Engineering Library Providing Access to Some E-Textbooks via Library Subs (Infodocket)

Romancing the E-book: A conversation with Book Riot’s Jessica Tripler (Teleread)

Incredible new resource! New York Public Library Invites You to Tap the Collection (NY Times)

How the New York Public Library made ebooks open, and thus one trillion times better (Boingboing)

Clemson and National Park Service Launch Open Digital #Repository w/ Over 100,000 Hi-Res Public Domain Images Avail (Infodocket)

e-Book Cover Design Awards, July 2016 (The Book Designer)

Looking Back at iOS Accessibility’s Biggest Milestones (512 Pixels)

Guest Post: You’re Wrong About Digital Comics – Here’s What You’re Missing (The Digital Reader)

Switzerland’s ETH-Bibliothek is uploading 134,000 images to Wikimedia Commons (Wikimeda)

Explore the Harvard Art Museums’ Massive Bauhaus Collection Online (Hyperallergic)

Bibliotheca Announces Partnership with PRH’s Living Language (Digital Book World)

Report Highlights: “Textbook Trends: How U.S. College Students Source Course Materials” (Infodocket)

OverDrive to present on expanded global distribution of digital content at Beijing International Book Fair (Overdrive)

Sno-Isle, OverDrive Test Demand-Driven Ebook Acquisition (Library Journal)

What Agents Should Know About Ebooks Made from PDFs (Digital Book World)

Axiell partners with Odlio to expand digital content offering to libraries (Library Stuff)

Ebook Anatomy: Inside the Black Box (The Book Designer)

Singapore Government launches public consultation on major copyright reform (IP Kitten)


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to books and all things creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

Info on who is speaking on Indie Author Day (and reminder there is still time for libraries to sign up)

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Since the announcement of the Indie Author Day (set for October 8th), 260 (and counting) libraries have signed up to participate. The event is designed to bring local writing communities together in their libraries to participate in panels, book readings and signings, workshops, and presentations. Then, at 2 p.m. EST everyone is invited to join a virtual panel featuring the following experts:

Moderator

Jon Fine, a First Amendment attorney, is best known in the publishing industry as the longtime Director of Author and Publisher Relations for Amazon. He left that position at the beginning of 2015 after almost a decade with the company, and now is consulting in professional online and traditional media and e-commerce, both in legal and business affairs.]

Panelists

Robin Cutler began her career in publishing over 30 years ago and is currently the Director of IngramSpark. She has also served as Assistant Director at USC Press and Executive Director of University Relations at the University of Wisconsin, she started a trade imprint, SummerHouse Press, and served as its CEO. Robin most recently worked as Vendor Manager for Amazon/CreateSpace. Robin has broad knowledge of indie, academic and trade publishing and is an expert in content creation and distribution, on-demand models, marketing and author strategies. Robin is a leader in the independent publishing space, and when not developing new programs and services for IngramSpark, she can often be found sharing her expertise at industry events around the world.

Kiera Parrott is the Reviews Director for School Library Journal and Library Journal. Through SELF-e, Library Journal is helping indie authors to get discovered in the library. Prior to working at Library Journal, Kiera was children’s librarian in various roles including head of children’s services at Darien Library in Connecticut, Darien’s children’s librarian / collection development coordinator and a children’s librarian at New York Public Library. Kiera’s favorite books are the ones that make her cry — or snort — on public transportation.

Jim Blanton was born and raised in Lexington, Kentucky. Upon graduating from U.K. in 2000 with his M.L.S., Jim went to work for the Chesapeake Public Library in Chesapeake, Virginia where he served in a variety of roles including Assistant Director. He was a two-time recipient of the Virginia Public Library Director’s award for Outstanding Adult Program of the Year, received the VPLD award for Outstanding Young Adult program and was also named by Library Journal as a 2012 Mover and Shaker for his work on a financial literacy game called Save Steve.

L. Penelope has been writing since she could hold a pen and loves getting lost in the worlds in her head. She is the author of new adult, fantasy and paranormal romance with characters who match the real world. Her debut novel, Song of Blood & Stone, won the 2016 Self-Publishing eBook Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. Learn more about L. Penelope and her books on her website.

News Roundup [August 19, 2016]

News Roundup

Each Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their companies, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture. Here’s the thinking behind what we choose to highlight:

  • focus on diversity and giving equal voice to established news sources as well as to blogs run by independent thinkers
  • promotion of efforts that support digital literacy (in all incarnations)
  • attention to ebook and literacy initiatives in emerging markets
  • strong interest in ideas propelling the industry forward rather than promotions of certain brands
  • strong interest in professionals  challenging the status quo and leading the way

Enjoy this week’s compilation.


@rhizome Has Released the First Public Version of #Webrecorder Library Journal

Did You Know Audible Will Steal Away Your Credits If You Cancel Your Membership? The Digital Reader

Kindle in Motion: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly about Amazon’s New Enhanced Format (Screenshots) The Digital Reader

Worldwide availability of current Kindle Models as of 8/11/16 Kindle World

eBook Accessibility Audit in UK Higher Education Cilip

The Idiomatic generates random idioms to annoy and confuse your friends Boingboing

Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec adds 2.4 million bibliographic records to WorldCat OCIC

Mountain West Digital Library (MWDL) Adds Digital Collections From Utah State Archives aaa Infodocket

Author Co-Founds Enhanced eBook Startup The Digital Reader

Amazon Deletes Kannada-Langauge eBook, Indian Literary Community Freaks Out The Digital Reader

VAT ON BOOKS IS HARMING PUBLIC EDUCATION IN KENYA Bizna

The Connecticut State Library Announces the First Phase of the Development of a Statewide Library eBook Platform CT State Library

Comment le Réseau Carel tente d’améliorer le prêt numérique en bibliothèque et PNB Scoop It

Technology is not the death of deep reading No Shelf Required

Kindle Unlimited Funding Jumps in July 2016 The Digital Reader

The forgotten world of TV guide magazines, curated Boingboing

Kindle Instant Preview Indies Unlimited

New Report: “Digitizing Orphan Works: Legal Strategies to Reduce Risks for Open Access to Copyrighted #OrphanWorks” Infodocket

Condé Nast adds iPad support for The New Yorker Today app Talking New Media

Reference: The Bauhaus, a Comprehensive New Digital Resource, Launched By The Harvard Art Museums Infodocket

Book Making: The typographical challenges in publishing indigenous-language books Quill and Quire

Writers Can Earn Cash With In-Story Ads on Wattpad Wattpad

Why publishers are turning to the atomisation of content Fipp

Barnes & Noble Introduces the New Samsung Galaxy Tab A NOOK Barnes & Noble

Kobo’s new Aura One e-reader is big and waterproof Engadget

Librarian uses 21st-century technology to showcase Buffalo’s 19th-century splendor Library Stuff

Explore our Catalogue of Medieval Manuscripts, a free online resource for Middle Ages fans Medieval Manuscrip Blog

The Fourth Time is the Charm: Wattpad to Interrupt Stories With Adverts The Digital Reader

“Wayback Machine Won’t Censor Archive for Taste, Director Says After Olympics Article Scrubbed” Infodocket

The Best New Way to Read? Novels Told Through Text Messages Library Stuff

Ed Note: All titles of the articles listed below appear in the style used in the original sources.


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to books and all things creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

News Roundup [August 5, 2016]

News Roundup

Each Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their companies, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture. Here’s the thinking behind what we choose to highlight:

  • focus on diversity and giving equal voice to established news sources as well as to blogs run by independent thinkers
  • promotion of efforts that support digital literacy (in all incarnations)
  • attention to ebook and literacy initiatives in emerging markets
  • strong interest in ideas propelling the industry forward rather than promotions of certain brands
  • strong interest in professionals  challenging the status quo and leading the way

Enjoy this week’s compilation.

Big thanks to @JeffBezos for being my guest on the eighth anniversary of the Kindle Chronicles!

Pocket US Constitution Becomes Amazon Bestseller

If Almost Forty Percent of ABA Members Aren’t Actually Indie Bookstores, Can We Really Say There’s a Revival?

Harry Potter Ebooks Arrive in China, in Both Chinese and English

Mapping the Free Ebook Supply Chain

Entitled: The art of naming without further elaboration or qualification.

Princeton’s Cotsen Library Digitizes Classic Soviet Children’s Books

Hachette Partners with Tapas in Push for Mobile Reading

Hummingbird Adds Audiobook-Only Capability to Platform

Txtr Has Closed, Customers Advised to Transfer Accounts to Juke

A Comic Book Artist Reinvents His Craft For Blind Readers

Blog: Browse Our Redesigned and Updated Digital Collections! – Free Library of Philadelphia

Authors, Please Keep Telling Readers How eBooks Should be Expensive

New Digital Collections Online: Florida Restaurant Menus from University of Miami Libraries

Kindle Unlimited Launches in Japan, Costs 980 Yen a Month

Localized iPad Pro Smart Keyboards Arrive

US Editors Observe Trends in the German Book Market | Riky Stock @GBONewYork http://ow.ly/6Ksr302PVan #FBM16

Publishers Lose Another Round in GSU Copyright Case

No power or running water – but digital books galore

OverDrive celebrates 30 years as the global leader in digital library content

Tapas Adds Hachette Titles to Its Pay-As-You-Read Comics Platform

The Changing Face of Publishing

You can now read Spanish stories in The New York Times’ Android app

Podcast: The audiobook gets its groove back

Interview with David Blum the Editor of Kindle Singles

Closed for business: Two big things that could penalize your Amazon author account (and how to prevent them)

Do Indies Have to Do Print?

What Do the Financial Reports from the Big Five Book Publishers Tell Us?

Getting Your EBook into Libraries

SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE ARCHIVE TO BE DIGITISED

Access-to-Own Now Available on ProQuest® Ebook Central™ Platform

Ed Note: All titles of the articles listed below appear in the style used in the original sources.]


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @MirelaRoncevic. For her writings related to books and all things creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

ProQuest reimagines RefWorks, reference management service for students, faculty and librarians

RefWorksProQuest has launched its newly improved RefWorks® reference management platform, simplifying and improving research and collaboration workflows.  With full-text management and tools for collaboration, the new RefWorks  platform addresses the needs of students, faculty and librarians with an innovative feature set. Libraries that offer this service to their constituents have access to administrative controls that help their institutions respect intellectual property rights, professional support for themselves and their end-users, and analytics that provide a consistent source of information on patron and content usage. From the rest of the press release: Continue reading ProQuest reimagines RefWorks, reference management service for students, faculty and librarians

Is your library participating in (and supporting) Indie Author Day? These organizations and libraries are.

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A big event is on the horizon this Fall. And NSR is proud (and honored) to be part of it (as a media supporter), especially since it is centered around libraries and reading and, most importantly, the idea that libraries must remain the places that encourage reading above all else. NSR is also the advocate for quality indie publishing, and this event is all about encouraging libraries to support and promote the work of authors from their local communities. The event is called Indie Author Day and here’s what it’s about:

Libraries across North America will host events on October 8th, 2016, designed to bring local writing communities together in their libraries to participate in author panels, book readings and signings, workshops, and presentations. Then, at 2 pm EST everyone is invited to join a digital gathering featuring Q&A with writers, agents, and industry leaders that will bring together the larger indie community. More information about Indie Author Day 2016 is available on its official site. Continue reading Is your library participating in (and supporting) Indie Author Day? These organizations and libraries are.

Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Sunday, May 22

This is a compilation of my real-time Twitter newsfeed – which is available at @paulkbiba

bibliotheca Announces Plans for Pay-Per-Use eAudiobooks and eBooks within Cloud Library https://t.co/hAdE0ebkhC

Kindle Unlimited Payout Jumps in April 2016 as Funding Pool Holds Steady https://t.co/E6EB7jpFRT

U.S. Copyright Office Wants Feedback on Mandatory Deposit of #EBooks and Sound Recordings Available Only Online https://t.co/genwpRHkkn Continue reading Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Sunday, May 22

Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Sunday, May 15

This is a compilation of my real-time Twitter newsfeed, available at @paulkbiba.


Cultural Heritage: Europeana’s 2016 Development Plans and Priorities https://t.co/40Ph3wis8e

Michael Tamblyn (@mtamblyn):How You Will be Reading in the Future: Kobo CEO’s Five Big Ideas /Rakuten Today https://t.co/DgC6Dhwwle

RT @infodocket Ebook Subscrip Service 24symbols Adds HarperCollins U.S. Titles, Partners w/ Libraries in South Amer https://t.co/J88tuz5cuf Continue reading Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Sunday, May 15

Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Sunday, May 8

This is a compilation of my real-time Twitter newsfeed, available at @paulkbiba


Improving literacy with Audio-ebooks https://t.co/1E4qN4aJnO

The IGP Digital Library is open https://t.co/XUn32S4RII

Reports sees the same trend for magazines as eBooks: Ending discounts cuts newsstand sales https://t.co/iYfxBuotIv

Book Snatching — Clearly the most violent act in the history of reading https://t.co/PqkWGm7i7d

Serial Reader https://t.co/QF6CtSPczi Continue reading Paul Biba’s eBook, eLibrary and ePublishing news compilation for week ending Sunday, May 8