Category Archives: Textbooks

CIL Conference – Empowering the Reader in a Digital World

This CIL session was presented by Chad Mairn, Information Services Librarian at St. Petersberg College and Al Carlson, System Administrator for the Tampa Bay Library Consortium.

Al Carlson:

  • Library automation, the internet, and EPUB are the three big things he feels have hit the library industry during his career.
  • The book is the content and not the package, ebook is just another package.
  • Diagnosing the DVD Disappointment:  A Life Cycle View by Judson Coplan – this article from 2006 is one that Al recommends to read as a comparison to how quickly ebooks may be adopted.
  • History suggests that ebooks will rapidly invade the codex space
  • Books aren’t dead, they are just changing Continue reading CIL Conference – Empowering the Reader in a Digital World

Articles of Interest

For the week of March 14th:

Readers, authors and librarians against DRM

Two Colorado Libraries Break New E-book Ground | American Libraries Magazine

Read the Fine Print | American Libraries Magazine  (Terms of Service on ebook Readers)

Must We Abide? | American Libraries Magazine

25% of textbook annual revenue to be from digital by 2015

Clive on Learning: Adventures in self-publishing

Charting the global e-book market – FutureBook

E=Book Lending Takes Off – WSJ.com


Four No Shelf Required Contributors Named 2011 LJ Movers and Shakers

No Shelf Required II:  The Use and Management of E-Books is currently underway with ALA Editions.  The forthcoming book offers a look at digital only libraries, device lending programs, consortial purchasing, eBook access issues (digital divide, accessibility, archiving/preservation, and weeding/updating), digital textbooks, the use of ebook/ereader technology in the classroom, and much much more.  When complete, it will contain 26 chapters written by 28 contributors, representing school, public, and academic libraries, publishers, consultants, and faculty.

I am pleased to announce that four of the contributors were named 2011 Library Journal Movers and Shakers.  They are:

Bobbi Newman

Buffy J. Hamilton

Joseph Sanchez

Sue Polanka

Congrats to these and all of the 2011 Library Journal Movers and Shakers!

Articles of Interest

Where Do Libraries Fit in the Ebook Ecosystem? | Digital Book World

The rise of the 99-cent Kindle e-book – CNET News

The New Economics of the University Press A Report from the AAUP

Ohio System teams with Flat World Knowledge on free digital textbooks

Interview with Ingram’s Skip Prichard

Iowa to Launch Statewide Ebook Program

TidBITS Entertainment: OverDrive, Bluefire, and the EPUBlic Library

McGraw-Hill’s iPad-enhanced ebooks by Inkling

Could the Kindle be free by the end of the year?

Cengage Unveils MindTap, an interactive learning program

Cengage Learning recently unveiled MindTapâ„¢, a program of digital products and services, including Cengage content, that engages students through interactivity and offers instructors choice in content, platforms, devices and learning tools.  Beyond an eBook, course delivery platform or Learning Management System, MindTap is the first in a new category of Personal Learning Experiences (PLEs). MindTap is device agnostic, giving students access to their course materials anytime, anywhere — on their desktops, laptops, tablets or mobile phones.

At the core of MindTap is MindTap Readerâ„¢, which is a new interactive platform that brings digital textbooks to life.  The MindTap Reader adds significant reading learning activity functionality embedded within the context of text and other elements including video/audio, annotations, activities, applications and instructor source materials, while also preparing existing products to take advantage of future MindTap services. Continue reading Cengage Unveils MindTap, an interactive learning program

Articles of Interest

McGraw-Hill’s iPad-enhanced ebooks by Inkling

Could the Kindle be free by the end of the year?

Barnes & Noble claims 25% of US e-book market share

David Rothman promotes the National Digital Library on the Chronicle of Higher Education

Go To Hellman: HarperCollins and the Suspension of eBook …

Podcast: The Future of the Textbook, as Seen by Publishers

How to turn the Nook Color into a fully-functional Android tablet

Can You Actually “Sell” an E-Book? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Shh! eBooks and the Quiet Conspiracy against Public Libraries

Exclusive: Kno Student Tablet Start-Up in Talks to Sell Off Tablet Part of Its Business

87% students feel online libraries and databases have had significant impact on learning

According to a survey released last week by Cengage Learning, 87% of students feel that online libraries and databases have had the most significant impact on their overall learning. The survey, entitled “Instructors and Students: Technology Use, Engagement and Learning Outcomes” conducted by Eduventures, identifies a new generation of students and highlights pressures and obstacles hindering student success. The survey was administered to 751 students and 201 instructors across the United States in December 2010. This is the second Cengage Learning/Eduventures survey designed to uncover how educational technology impacts overall student engagement and learning outcomes.  Some additional library, database and ebook/ereader results are below.

What type of impact have the following technologies had on your overall learning?

Articles of Interest

US Justice Department and FTC looking into Apple’s subscription service; EU monitoring as well

What We Talk About When We Talk About Business Models – The Scholarly Kitchen

Sustainable Business Models for Open Textbooks

My experience with the Espresso Book Machine

Publishing CTOs Want Standard Formats – eBookNewser

The True Cost of Publishing on the Amazon Kindle

Global eReader Sales Expected To Grow To $8.2 Billion By 2014 – eBookNewser

The Kindle Will (Finally) Get Page Numbers

OERs: the good, the bad and the ugly

TOC Keynote, Making the book truly accessible, Jim Fruchterman, Benetech

Jim Fruchterman wants to make the book truly accessible and feels we have a good start, but a long way to go. Bookshare is the largest online library for people with disabilities, they download more than 1 million books per year. His service only serves about 1% of the population, and they turn away so many people who don’t qualify for the free service.  He feels this is an untapped market for publishers.  People with disabilities want to buy books, read books, listen to books, etc.  At bookshare, they do a lot of content conversion to more accessible formats and can offer the content back to the publishers.  Their main product is the digital text, which is not a commercial quality ebook, thus you won’t find them on pirated sites. If Bookshare finds any of their titles on pirated sites, they contact the client, remove content, etc. Continue reading TOC Keynote, Making the book truly accessible, Jim Fruchterman, Benetech

TOC – Digital Textbooks Panel Summary

Panel discussion on eTextbooks in Higher Education:  Practical Findings to Guide the Industry.   Panelists included Jade Roth, Curtiss Barnes, Nick Francesco, David McCarthy, Jacob Robinson, and Susan Stites-Doe.  Panelist names/titles are available on the conference website.

Notes are my own interpretation and my best attempts were made to ensure accuracy.

Some overview data:  15% of textbook content is avaiable in digital format, yet only 1 – 3% of higher education sales are digital, sales are across all disciplines, there is no clear winner in the format.

14% of students have purchased digital materials, primarily for cost savings, 18% purchase for features, and 10% for curiosity. Continue reading TOC – Digital Textbooks Panel Summary

Articles of Interest

Global eReader Sales Expected To Grow To $8.2 Billion By 2014 – eBookNewser

The Kindle Will (Finally) Get Page Numbers

OERs: the good, the bad and the ugly

E-Book Sales Rise in Children’s and Young Adult Categories – NY Times

Apple responds: we want a cut of Amazon, Sony e-book sales

Amazon Continues Its Push into Publishing

Horizon Report – Ebooks – One year or less to Adoption

This is probably not a surprise to many people, but the 2011 Horizon Report has listed eBooks as a technology that has one year or less to adoption.

From the Horizon Report:  “Now that they are firmly established in the consumer sector, electronic books are beginning to demonstrate capabilities that challenge the very definition of reading. Audiovisual, interactive, and social elements enhance the informational content of books and magazines. Social tools extend the reader’s experience into the larger world, connecting readers with one another and enabling deeper, collaborative explorations of the text. The content of electronic books and the social activities they enable, rather than the device used to access them, are the keys to their popularity; nearly everyone carries some device that can function as an electronic reader, and more people are engaging with electronic books than ever before.”

Mobile is another one year or less to adoption technology.

Augmented reality and game-based learning are two to three years out, and gesture based computing and learning analytics are four to five years out.

Articles of Interest

Ebook sales rise 130% in November

Is the $5.00 eBook the New $9.99 eBook? – eBookNewser

ALA Midwinter 2011: ALCTS Panel Considers the Impact of Patron-Driven Acquisition on Selection and Collections

Google Acquires eBook Technologies | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

Kobo adds 175K Education, Technical and Reference PDFs

Bridging the eBook-Library System Divide

Goodbye, DRM? FutureBook blog

Blio Partners with Dell ” PWxyz

Amid E-Book Growth, Students Still Prefer Paper Textbooks

Reader Apps vs. Dedicated Book Apps

Twitter Stats Reveal How the iPad, Kindle, and Nook Stack Up …

Articles of Interest

Top 10 Articles of 2010 – Digital Book World

Amazon Kindle E-Reader Sales Will Keep Growing in 2011: 10 Reasons Why – Mobile and Wireless – News & Reviews – eWeek.com

Predictions for 2011 from Smashwords Founder – GalleyCat

How to add books to the iPad, iPhone, etc.

Check Out Library Books Using Your Phone – eBookNewser

David Thornburg on Open-Source Textbooks | Edutopia

Almost One-Third of Internet Users Plan to Buy a Kindle

Feeding Your E-book Habit: Borrowing From the Library The …

Year One: The Born Digital Publisher – The Scholarly Kitchen

Go To Hellman: 2010 Summary: Libraries are Still Screwed

How to find free Kindle books

NOOK ereaders become biggest seller in B&N’s history

People will pay for digital content says Pew Internet & American Life Project

IDATE releases ebook report

Prediction for 2011 – The Individual Rules – The Scholarly Kitchen

Steve Haber: The Changing Role of Libraries in the Digital Age

New blog on digital textbooks

A new blog focusing on digital textbooks is now available at:  http://digital-textbooks.blogspot.com/ According to moderator, Gerry McKiernan, Associate Professor and Science and Technology Librarian, Iowa State University Library, “DT is devoted to documenting significant initiatives that relate to any and all aspects of Digital Textbooks, most notably their use in Higher Education. DT will seek to profile major, as well as minor, content as well as current and emerging platforms and technologies.”

Articles of Interest

Articles of Interest

Why E-Textbooks Just Make Sense: An Academic and a Literary Agent Explain

Holiday Gift Guide To eReaders – eBookNewser

OER 101: Theory and Practice (Open Educational Resources)

NOOKcolor: Hands-On Review and Thoughts for the Future

Marred by Shelving | ALA TechSource (Lending eBooks)

Barnes & Noble opens first Spanish language digital bookstore in the US

Dedicated ereaders the choice of heavy readers, says BSIG study

As Textbooks Go Digital, Campus Bookstores May Go Bookless – Technology

Home – Kindles at The Unquiet Library – LibGuides at Creekview High School

Maine Libraries Adopt eBook Program – eBookNewser

One World Publishing – Scholarly Kitchen

Copia Debuts Social Reading Platform, Kills $99 E-Reader

Articles of Interest

Three misperceptions about the ebook business

Textbooks headed for ash heap of history?

A Student’s Stranded On A Desert Island … Tech Devices

Inside the Google Books Algorithm – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

iTunes U Introduces Free eBooks: Download Shakespeare’s Complete Works

Joe Wikert’s Publishing 2020 Blog: eBooks: Lending vs. Reselling

Forrester Research on future of ebooks: $3 billion by 2015

Will Your Local Library Lend E-Books? (Or Can They?)

Library eBooks on the iPad/iPhone, no Sync Required – Library Journal

Kindle Facts and Figures (history & specs)

Textbooks: It’s about economics and selection, not format

Great article on The Scholarly Kitchen blog by Kent Anderson, who is questioning a recent survey on student preference of print textbooks.  A clip from the blog post:

Anderson says, “The survey is drawing the wrong conclusion by framing the question in terms of media choice. It’s not about print versus electronic. It’s about economics and selection.

Imagine if someone asked you if you wanted to pay more for something and have limited selection. Would you trade a cheaper format with a broader selection for something you’d calculate as more costly and less abundant? Only if you’re a devoted early adopter.

For the vast majority of students, print textbooks are economically superior to e-books simply because there’s a robust used book market for expensive print textbooks. Buy them new, sell them back. Want them cheaper? Buy them used. The market is much more favorable and robust.”  end clip

Later in the post, Anderson states, “As an aside, I have yet to find this survey released in any form other than a press release. That’s not a good sign. It makes me think the whole thing was about generating the press release.” I’ll add to Anderson’s speculation by repeating something I heard at the Charleston Conference last week.  Can you really trust surveys that boast student’s reliance on the print book which are sponsored by college bookstores?