Category Archives: Surveys/Statistics/Reports

Articles of Interest

Library Publishing Report Suggests Partnerships, Creating Positions   – Library Journal

Aloha Encyclopaedia Britannica Print Edition – Information Today

Thinking more about ebooks and libraries and what big publishers should do – The Shatzkin Files

Libraries as Community Publishers:  How to Turn the Tables – Publishers Weekly

How to Protect Copyright Is Key Topic at Publishers’ Meeting – Chronicle of Higher Education

The Portal Problem, Part 1: The Plight of the Britannica – Scholarly Kitchen

Jetbook Color Now Deployed to NYC’s Largest High School – eBook Newser

Speed and Retention — Are e-Readers more Slower and More Forgetful – Scholarly Kitchen

The Statistical Abstract lives on – ProQuest will publish starting in 2013

Wonderful news today from ProQuest. They will continue the tradition of publishing the Statistical Abstract of the United States, beginning with the 2013 edition (in print and digital formats).  They will partner with Bernan Press who will continue the tradition of publishing the print edition.   No word on pricing at this time.  Here is the full press release:

ProQuest Picks up Where the Census Bureau Left Off:

The Statistical Abstract of the United States Will Be Back This Year

Researchers’ cherished guide to social and economic stats gets a new lease on digital and print life

March 22, 2012 (ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — ProQuest will rescue one of researchers’ most valued reference tools when it takes on publication of the Statistical Abstract of the United States beginning with the 2013 edition. The move ensures continuation of this premier guide to an extraordinary array of statistics, which has been published since 1878. The U.S. Census Bureau, responsible for publishing the work, announced in March 2011 that it would cease production of the Statistical Abstract after the 2012 edition, prompting widespread concern among librarians, journalists, and researchers about the disappearance of this essential research tool.

“I’m thrilled that ProQuest will continue aggregating this important content,” said Wright State University librarian Sue Polanka, author of the widely read No Shelf Required blog. Polanka was part of a Reference User Services Association committee who organized a discussion at the American Library Association’s Midwinter conference about how to save the Statistical Abstract from extinction. “Even in our increasingly digital world, the Statistical Abstract remains one of the best reference sources for libraries.”  [summary of the program, SP] Continue reading The Statistical Abstract lives on – ProQuest will publish starting in 2013

New LRG study- 74% of libraries report increased demand for electronic offerings

“Close to three-fourths of respondents, 74%, report that demand for their libraries’ electronic offerings have increased over the past year”

A new report from Library Resource Guide and Unisphere Research, ” The Digital Squeeze: Libraries at the Crossroads—The Library Resource Guide Benchmark Study on 2012 Library Spending Plans,” shows an increased demand for all types of digital content in libraries. This should come as no surprise, particularly for those librarians in public service fielding the questions about downloading ebooks and streaming movies.   Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc.  The research for the study was sponsored by ProQuest.

Quotes pulled from the report (free download with registration): Continue reading New LRG study- 74% of libraries report increased demand for electronic offerings

Library Renewal Article – The Arithmetic of Library E-Book Lending

A great article is available on the Library Renewal site  – $2 BILLION FOR $1 BILLION OF BOOKS: THE ARITHMETIC OF LIBRARY E-BOOK LENDING written by Jonathan Chambers.

Here is a clip from the introductory material:  Library Renewal wants to help libraries build a powerful new way to get econtent to their patrons. We envision a new infrastructure, one that is vastly improved, equitable and fairly priced (with hidden costs eliminated). In order to figure out exactly how to make something like that a reality and create an actionable plan we have been busy doing research and meeting with experts from a variety of areas. We’ve naturally talked with plenty of library folks, but we have also actively included and sought out others that have legal, business and publishing expertise. Jonathan Chambers, the author of this piece, fits that bill perfectly and has worked directly with us a great deal over the past year. Here you’ll see the sort of approach some folks working with Library Renewal are thinking about. We (both Library Renewal and Mr. Chambers) would love to hear your reactions to this post in the comments.
*note* While the pricing changes implemented very recently by Random House are not factored into the dollar amounts discussed here, that in no way changes the conclusions that are drawn in this piece. Drastic changes like what we have been seeing related to libraries and econtent are endemic to the systems currently in place. We believe that these sorts of market shifts serve to strengthen the premise that specific types of action are in order and that Library Renewal is the perfect partner for that work. Enjoy!

ebrary releases social media data from Global Student E-book Survey

From a February 21 ebrary press release:

ebrary®, a ProQuest business and leading provider of e-books and research technology, today announced that the social media data of its 2011 Global Student E-book Survey is now publicly available at http://site.ebrary.com/lib/surveys along with the full report.

Among other key findings, the addendum revealed the following:

  • While 41% of students are currently using social media for research or study, 59% are not.  Reasons for not using social media include that existing sites are not a reliable source of information.
  • When asked if they would use social media to share research with peers, 58% of students indicated “likely” to “very likely,” while 43% stated “unlikely.”
  • 35% students indicated they would “likely” to “very likely” pose a question to a librarian using social media, compared to 45% who would “likely” to “very likely” use social media to pose a question to faculty.
  • When asked if they would use social media to connect with students with similar academic interests, 69% stated “likely” to “very likely,” while 31% stated “unlikely.”

Continue reading ebrary releases social media data from Global Student E-book Survey

39% of U.S. Public Libraries without e-books

I missed this report when it was released back in December, 2011 by COSLA, the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies.  According to a survey of state libraries from the summer of 2011, 39% of public libraries reported offering no downloadable media service – no ebooks, no audiobooks, and no videos.

Here is more from the press release:

The Chief Officers of State Library agencies recently surveyed their membership to determine the extent to which U.S. public libraries are offering downloadable ebooks, audiobooks and videos for use on portable devices like e-readers and smartphones.

The results of the survey, conducted this summer, showed that 39% of public libraries in the U.S. had not yet begun to offer downloadable media service to their communities, a matter of great concern to state librarians. Continue reading 39% of U.S. Public Libraries without e-books

LJ’s Patron Profiles and a free webinar

Public librarians, have you seen Library Journal’s new publication, Patron Profiles?  It’s chock full of data and analysis on public library users.  From the preface: “Patron Profiles focuses on who uses libraries, why they use libraries, and how that use may change. We are interested in their usage of content—especially via the discrete products such as books, videos, and music that libraries buy or lease, lend or distribute.”

Here are some nuggets I found from the January issue (28 pages of data and analysis on mobile devices, mobile content, and library apps):

  • Ebook usage continues to increase and patrons who prefer ebooks are, on average, more active library patrons than those who prefer printed books. They are generally more voracious in their media consumption. They visit their libraries more often, read more books, and buy more books. Continue reading LJ’s Patron Profiles and a free webinar

Life after the Statistical Abstract – ALAMW discussion summary

The following is a summary of:

RUSA/CODES Reference Publishing Discussion Forum: Life after the Statistical Abstract.

What will the proposed demise of the Statistical Abstract mean for reference librarians and library users?  Now in its 130th annual edition, Statistical Abstract has played a central role in guiding users to statistics since before we were born.   Since finding statistics can be challenging under the best of circumstances, what are our strategies for dealing with this loss? Are there new services and products we would like to see from commercial publishers?

Alesia McManus, owner of the “Save the US Statistical Abstract” Facebook page, moderated the discussion.  About 50 librarians, publishers, and vendors attended.

Alesia McManus, Dan Coyle from ProQuest and Bruce Samuelson from Bernan Publishing all spoke briefly to start the session. Continue reading Life after the Statistical Abstract – ALAMW discussion summary

OverDrive use data – demand doubled but what about circulation?

Below is a press release from OverDrive regarding 2011 use stats.  Clearly the demand for library eBooks has increased; “doubled” according to the press release.  While I’m thoroughly impressed by the interest and demand in content, I can’t help but focus on 4 of the statistics below. 1.6 billion book/title pages viewed by 99 million visitors, yet only 35 million digital titles were checked out in 2011 with 17 million holds (OverDrive did not indicate % increases here).  How can we meet the growing demands of patrons when the holds list is nearly half of the checkouts?  Public librarians, is this proportionate to your print circulation/holds data?  Additionally, if 99 million people visited the site, how many of them left with either an item checked out or placed on hold?  Reading between the lines, it looks to me like 99 million visitors tried very hard to search the catalog (1.6 billion views) for an available title and most left with nothing.

Here is more from the press release:

Dallas, TX – American Library Association Midwinter Conference, Jan. 19, 2012 – OverDrive, the leading global distributor of eBooks and audiobooks, will release 2011 year-end statistics from its global network of 18,000 libraries and schools in 21 countries at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference in Dallas, January 20-23 (Booth 845).  Due to the rapid expansion of device compatibility and consumer awareness, eBook discovery and online reader visits at libraries and schools worldwide experienced triple digit growth in 2011: OverDrive library website traffic more than doubled to 1.6 billion page views and visitor sessions also doubled to nearly 100 million.  At the conference, OverDrive will share statistics and user profile data as well as demonstrate new digital book discovery services to help libraries meet the exploding demand. Continue reading OverDrive use data – demand doubled but what about circulation?

Booklist survey on E-books

Booklist is soliciting input from libraries who are purchasing e-books. They are interested in the fiction/non-fiction variety, not reference.  The survey takes about 5 minutes.  Here is a broader description:
Help us understand the collection development process for e-books at your library.

If your library offers trade e-books (fiction and nonfiction, not reference e-books) to patrons, please take this important Booklist survey on e-book collection development. The survey should take about 5 minutes to complete. Your input will help us put together a snapshot of how libraries manage e-book collections in the real world and will help shape future Booklist webinars, feature content, and reviews.

Articles of Interest

Some numbers on the Kindle owners lending library and KDP – teleread.com

B&N discounting Nooks with periodical subscriptions – marco.org

Barnes & Noble to Offer Nook Discount to Subscribers of 2 publications – nytimes.com

Launching the University Press Content Consortia – wordpress.com

Guggenheim Museum Getting Into eBooks – mediabistro.com

Reddit to Black Itself Out Next Week in Protest of SOPA – theatlantic.com

Ebooks take off over the holidays, says USA Today – teleread.com

Amazon introduces iPad Kindle Store – macworld.com

Brave New World: First Sale Doctrine: Digital Threat or Opportunity – blogspot.com

How Barnes & Noble Can Take a Bite Out of Amazon – sspnet.org

Safari Books Online acquires makers of Ibis Reader – ThreePress Consulting – teleread.com

Ultimate Discovery Engine – publishersweekly.com

Three Library Predictions for 2012 – Andy Woodworth

NISO Releases Updated Draft of SERU: A Shared Electronic Resource Understanding – infodocket.com

Kobo has 10x increase in readers over holidays; top ebooks by country – teleread.com

Turn WebPages into Kindle, Epub eBooks with dotEpub – mediabistro.com

My Argument for Public Access to Research Reports – sspnet.org

House takes Senate’s bad Internet censorship bill, tries to make it worse – arstechnica.com

More Than a Million eReaders Were Given Away in the UK This Season – mediabistro.com

Full Text Article: The Evolution of E-books and Interlibrary Loan in Academic Libraries – infodocket.com

Articles of Interest

Why Might A Publisher Pull Its E-Books From Libraries? by Laura Hazard Owen « INFOdocket
Which E-Books Are Most Borrowed From Libraries, And Why? | paidContent
So you want to start a Kindle lending program | code4lib
How to add public domain books to the Kindle, by Piotr Kowalczyk | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics
Kobo has 10x increase in readers over holidays; top ebooks by country | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics
Full Text Article: The Evolution of E-books and Interlibrary Loan in Academic Libraries « INFOdocket
Seven Advantages Barnes & Noble Has in the Bookseller Wars | Digital Book World
Barnes & Noble May Spin Off Nook Business
Turn WebPages into Kindle, Epub eBooks with dotEpub – eBookNewser
Baen Webscriptions is now BaenEbooks.com | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics
The Association of American Publishers – Publishers Applaud “Research Works Act,”Bipartisan Legislation To End Government Mandates on Private-Sector Scholarly Publishing
My Argument for Public Access to Research Reports « The Scholarly Kitchen
House takes Senate’s bad Internet censorship bill, tries making it worse
More Than a Million eReaders Were Given Away in the UK This Christmas Season – eBookNewser
E-Textbooks Saved Many Students Only $1 – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education
If Libraries Didn’t Exist, Would Publishers Be Trying To Kill Book Lending? | Techdirt

Articles of Interest – What you’ve missed the last two weeks

Many of you have been away on holiday the last two weeks, so here is a list of interesting articles you may have missed:

Go To Hellman: 2011: The Year the eBook Wars Broke Out


Five Big Publishing Stories of 2011 That Will Bleed into 2012 – DigitalBookWorld

Five things we learned about publishing in 2011| O’Reilly Radar

A few future sources of ebook innovation| FutureBook

Kindle Fire On Track For Hundreds Of Impressions TechCrunch

Amazon has over 65,000 ebooks in Kindle Owners Lending Library| publiclibraries.com

Online pirates threaten Kindle profits| Dailymail.co.uk

eReader Shipments Grow 108% in 2011 Mediabistro

How much should an ebook cost? The Domino Project

Seth Godin sees bare-bones future of books thanks to long tail   Teleread

Publishing Insiders Reveal Price-Fixing… The Digital Reader

Parliament looks into UK’s 20% VAT

We must, we must, make VAT dust | FutureBook

UNESCO Launches Global Portal to Track Open Access sspnet.org

Open Educational Resources: The Bridge…EDUCAUSE

Open-Textbook Idea Is Gaining Steam -…Chronicle of Higher Education

A Dialogue on Patron-Driven Acquisitions| Scholarly Kitchen

Bowker’s PubTrack to study cookbook buyer behavior

As an avid cook and one who uses various devices (print, e, apps, TV, and more) to find interesting recipes, I’m looking forward to reading more in this forthcoming annual study from Bowker.

Here’s more from the press release:  PubTrackâ„¢ Consumer will launch a comprehensive new research study into the behavior of cookbook buyers, which will enable publishers to make better informed decisions in one the industry’s most dynamic market segments. The PubTrack Consumer Cookbook Publishing Report will determine how, where and why consumers buy cookbooks, digging deep into the impact of the digital transformation on what consumers buy and how they learn about cookbooks and authors.  Over time, this annual study will plot trends so that publishers can develop products that fit more precisely to the shifting preferences of their customers.  PubTrack is a highly regarded service of Bowker, an affiliated business of ProQuest. Continue reading Bowker’s PubTrack to study cookbook buyer behavior

Articles of Interest – SOPA, Amazon & Local Bookstores, Digital Textbooks

Go To Hellman: Book Lending Ignorance

Go To Hellman: SOPA Could Put Common Library Software in the Soup

More controversy over Amazon price-checking versus independent bookstores | TeleRead

Amazon Doesn’t Care About Your Local Bookstore | Epicenter | Wired.com

Stop Treating $9.99 As The Magic E-Book Price | paidContent

E-Book Readers Face Sticker Shock – WSJ.com

New Mobile Connectivity Options at the Hillsborough Library | NJ.com

Libraries launching Chromebook check-out programs | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics

Goodbye Textbooks, Hello iPad | PCWorld

Kno Giving Away $10 Million in Free eTextbooks — The Digital Shift

The Broader Context of Patron-Driven Acquisitions « The Scholarly Kitchen

Education Department releases new data on academic libraries | Inside Higher Ed

92% of librarians say offline access to eBooks more or equally important than online access

ebrary has done a number of survey’s over the years.   They recently released the results of their 2011 survey of librarians regarding mobile and offline access.  The results are available (registration required) at http://www.tfaforms.com/222151.  Last June, I interviewed Matt Barnes, VP of Marketing at ebrary about the download survey and ebrary’s new PDA program. Feel free to have a listen.

According to the ebrary press release, “Among other key findings, the survey revealed that 92% of librarians find providing offline access to e-books more or equally important than providing online access.” Continue reading 92% of librarians say offline access to eBooks more or equally important than online access

Articles of Interest

The No Shelf Required Guide to E-Book Purchasing | ALA TechSource

US eBook Sales Doubled in September – eBookNewser

Penguin Restores Kindle Lending, but Still Not Providing Digital Editions of New Titles — The Digital Shift

Cambridge U. Press Would Like to Rent You an Article – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Amazon Reports Best Kindle Sales EVAR on Black Friday – eBookNewser

What We Should Learn from the Collapse of Borders « The Scholarly Kitchen

The big list of free Kindle tools | freewaregenius.com

Max Basaraba Talks Digital Publishing – eBookNewser

So What Do You Do, Joshua Tallent, eBook Formatting Expert? – mediabistro.com Content

E-Everything: Putting It All Together

The November, 2011 issue of Against the Grain focuses on the e-everything future.  Edited by Audrey Powers from the University of South Florida, the issue discusses e-content procurement, access models and technology, content integration, first sale doctrine, and much more. It’s a great line-up of contributors and topics.  The table of contents should be posted on their site very soon here:  http://www.against-the-grain.com/toc/

Many of the contributors were also part of the E-Everything pre-conference during the Charleston Conference in early November.  Archived versions of the pre-conference presentation will be available on Against the Grain and Libraries Thriving sites.

Articles of Interest

Kindle Fire to Ship with Amazon Appstore, Access to Several Thousand Apps – eBookNewser

Wake Forest and Odigia collaborate on textbook alternative | TeleRead

All 50 State Librarians Vote to Form Alliance With Internet Archive’s Open Library — The Digital Shift

BISG Press Release | More Than a Passing Fancy: Ongoing BISG Study Reveals E-Book Buyers Deepening Commitment to Digital Formats

Paying for first

How to Extend the Due Date of Your Library eBook on the Kindle | Librarian by Day

Ebrary Ebook Downloads: the First Time | Academic Librarian

Library With Free Online College Textbooks Makes Debut — The Digital Shift

Major Medical Library Closing Its Doors to Patrons and Moving to Digital Model — The Digital Shift

Can Amazon and Apple Peacefully Coexist? Probably, But As for Google… « The Scholarly Kitchen

Advocates say public money for open educational resources is smart investment | Inside Higher Ed

Self-Published Authors Need Success to Begin – WSJ.com

Douglas County Libraries Strikes New Deals With Publishers to Own Ebooks

ebrary’s 2011 Global Student E-book Survey results

ebrary is announcing the availability of  the 2011 Global Student E-book Survey.  Full results (downloadable) will be available in January.  Those of you attending the Charleston Conference next week can get a sneak peek at the results during a session on Friday (details below).  Here is more from the press release:

ebrary Surveys Suggest Students’ Research Needs Unmet, Results to be Presented at Charleston

November 1, 2011 – Palo Alto, CA, USA – In an ongoing effort to better understand the research requirements and expectations of students, especially as they relate to books, ebrary® today announced the initial results of its 2011 Global Student E-book Survey.  A comparison of the new survey with the same survey conducted in 2008 implies that aggregators, publishers, and librarians need to better collaborate to address students’ information and research needs. Continue reading ebrary’s 2011 Global Student E-book Survey results