Surveys/Statistics/Reports

EBSCO use data for articles and books now included in PlumX impact factor

IPSWICH, Mass. — June 23, 2014 — Metrics from Plum™ Analytics will now include usage statistics for articles and books that are available from EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) databases and EBSCO Discovery Service. The article-level data from these databases will allow Plum Analytics’ product PlumX to provide usage statistics on articles and books from tens of thousands of providers. This collaboration marks the first time the wealth of information about the actual usage per article such as abstract views, downloads, etc. can be measured across publishers. Continue reading EBSCO use data for articles and books now included in PlumX impact factor

New OCLC Research report provides evidence base for shift to shared print management approach

DUBLIN, Ohio, January 23, 2014—OCLC Research has released a new report, “Understanding the Collective Collection: Towards a System-wide Perspective on Library Print Collections,” which establishes evidence that has allowed and encouraged libraries to begin the shift from local provisioning of library collections and services to increased reliance on cooperative infrastructure, collective collections, shared technology platforms, and “above-the-institution” management strategies.

“Understanding the Collective Collection” collects important work OCLC Research has done for the community in recent years in providing a quantitative, analytic, system-wide view of library collections. It provides critical context for the policy, service and strategy questions raised by shared print discussions in the library community. Continue reading New OCLC Research report provides evidence base for shift to shared print management approach

50% of American adults own eReader or tablet says new Pew report

Pew Internet Research released a new report yesterday on eReaders and eReading.  The report, “E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps” reports an increase in device ownership and eReading among Americans.

Some highlights:

  • 50% of American adults own either an eReader or tablet device
  • eReaders and tablet devices used for reading ebooks nearly twice as much as computers and cell phones
  • Reading eBooks on tablet devices has increased from 23% to 55% in 3 years

Much, much more available in the full report.

SAGE white paper explores discoverability of scholarly content, recommends standards, transparency, metadata, and partnerships

Los Angeles, CA (January 16, 2014)   In a changing academic environment, discoverability of scholarly content demands cooperative efforts across the communications supply chain. A new SAGE white paper, out today, summarizes the current discovery landscape for scholarly communications, advocates for cooperative efforts across the industry, and proposes specific recommendations for discoverability improvement for librarians, publishers, and service providers.

“This white paper draws upon novel insights contributed by international experts about the scholarly ecosystem of publisher content, research tools, and library systems. The experts make predictions about new cross-sector partnerships as researcher workflows evolve,” stated lead author Mary Somerville. “Our recommendations advance the common goal of furthering discovery, access, and usage of scholarly publications and creative work.” Continue reading SAGE white paper explores discoverability of scholarly content, recommends standards, transparency, metadata, and partnerships

Negotiating with vendors, 91% of librarians do not have a documented process

Last week at the Charleston Conference, Matt Dunie, President of Data-Planet, presented with colleagues Carl Grant and Mike Gruenberg in a session entitled, “Secrets in Vendor Negotiations.”  In preparation for this event, Matt sent a short survey (11 questions) to librarians to inquire about their preparations before vendor negotiations.

Highlights of the survey:

Department of Commerce needs input on digital first sale by November 13

Several blogs and news sources are reporting on a public meeting regarding the first sale doctrine as it relates to digital files.  Teleread’s Juli Monroe posted last Thursday.  In her post she said, “There’s going to be a public meeting scheduled for December 12 in Washington D.C., and the U.S. Department of Commerce is seeking public comment from all interested stakeholders on the issue of first sale doctrine and digital files, including ebooks.

A notice was published in the Federal Register

Matt Enis at the The Digital Shift also reported on this topic.  He said, “The Department of Commerce encourages librarians and other interested parties to file comments electronically by email to: CopyrightComments2013@uspto.gov before the November 13 deadline.”

Self-Publishing soars in 2012 – 60% more works than in 2011 according to Bowker

Self-Publishing Movement Continues Strong Growth in U.S. says Bowker- 2012 ISBNs show nearly 60% more self-published works than in 2011

New Providence, NJ – October 9, 2013 – A new analysis of U.S. ISBN data by ProQuest affiliate Bowker reveals that the number of self-published titles in 2012 jumped to more than 391,000, up 59 percent over 2011 and 422 percent over 2007. Ebooks continue to gain on print, comprising 40 percent of the ISBNs that were self-published in 2012, up from just 11 percent in 2007.

“The most successful self-publishers don’t view themselves as writers only, but as business owners,” said Beat Barblan, Bowker Director of Identifier Services. “They invest in their businesses, hiring experts to fill skill gaps and that’s building a thriving new service infrastructure in publishing.”

The analysis shows the growing prominence of a handful of companies that offer publishing services to individual authors.  More than 80 percent of self-published titles came to market with support from just eight companies, including Smashwords and CreateSpace. Continue reading Self-Publishing soars in 2012 – 60% more works than in 2011 according to Bowker

New study finds 67% of parents prefer print books for bedtime reading to children

A new study, “The State of Bedtime Stories Survey,”  conducted online by Harris Interactive (R) in April 2013 (on behalf of Reading is Fundamental and with the support of Macy’s) was just released.  The study provides insight on the state of reading to children (8 and under) at bedtime.  The report asks about book format, with 67% of parents reporting they typically use printed formats when reading bedtime stories.  The full study, executive summary, and infographic are available for online reading or download via Reading is Fundamental on Scribd.

Here is the data related to book format preference, from the executive summary:

What form of book [do/did] you typically use when reading bedtime stories to your[X]-year old [son/daughter]?
Seventy-six percent of parents of children age 8 years or younger report that they typically use a printed book format when reading bedtime stories to their child, while 2% typically use an e-book format and 17% use both of these book formats.

Library value in the developing world, new study published

SAGE, in consultation with Claire Creaser of LISU the national research and information centre based at Loughborough University (UK), and Lucy Browse of International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP) have published the results of a research study, Library Value in the Developing World.

The final report has been published and can be downloaded for free here.  Below is a summary of the study and findings, from the SAGE website.

Raising awareness of how the library supports teaching and research staff is key to demonstrating library value in developing countries, concludes a new report published today. The findings are the result of a six-month research study with twelve developing country institutions conducted by SAGE exploring perceptions of the value of academic libraries by teaching and research staff in developing countries. Continue reading Library value in the developing world, new study published

68 essential resources for eBooks in libraries by Ellyssa Kroski

Ellyssa Kroski, Director of Information Technology at the New York Law Institute and the blogger for OEDb’s iLibrarian, as well as a writer, educator, and international conference speaker, developed this list of 68 essential resources about eBooks in libraries.  Ellyssa has organized the list into several broad categories including:  general, devices, blogs, purchasing, creating, and more.

68 Essential Resources for eBooks in Libraries

eBooks are a constant topic in library news today.  If you’re just getting caught up or striving to keep current, here are 68 resources that will put you in-the-know and help you make an informed decision about implementing eBooks in your library. Continue reading 68 essential resources for eBooks in libraries by Ellyssa Kroski

Big Six eBooks in libraries, a comparison chart

I came across this wonderful PDF from ALA’s Digital Content Working Group (DCWG) showing the availability of Big Six (soon to be Big Five) ebook titles to libraries.  Random House, Harper Collins, Hachette, Macmillan, Penguin, and Simon & Schuster are included.  It highlights the amount of content available for purchase, license/use terms, and the vendor platforms where content is available.  Robert C. Maier is maintaining the document and his last update was May 15, 2013, so the information is pretty up-to-date.  Robert based his chart on one started at Library Journal earlier this year. He welcomes comments via email at robert_maier[at]comcast.net

Thanks, Robert, for maintaining this information.

Internet Archive – 15m downloads per month, 2m ebooks scanned,1,000 partners and other new facts

Robert Miller, Global Director of eBooks for the Internet Archive, sent this email to IA sponsors, partners, and content contributors.  It has some really interesting facts, figures, and updates from the IA and Robert was kind enough to let me repost it here on NSR in full. I have highlighted some of those remarkable facts and figures in bold below.

Dear Archive Sponsors, Content Contributors and Partners,

We are at the mid-year point in 2013. I wanted to share  with you some “news you can use” about several milestones we will soon be reaching, a few changes in our pricing structure and plans for the remainder of the year. Please feel free to distribute this email to the appropriate people on your teams or the libraries you represent.

First, thank you for your continued support of the Internet Archive. We, together, have collectively built the largest, free, public digital lending library in the world. Yippee to all of us!

Funding
As you might remember, our original funding for the Internet Archive digitization program came in the form of a generous grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 2004. This one-time grant was never meant to be ongoing, but was to allow for the development of a low cost, high quality digitization program to be used by libraries to complement, enhance or replace their own internal efforts. In short, it was to be a backbone infrastructure service and resource to help libraries move quickly and decisively into eBooks, both in terms of access and preservation. Continue reading Internet Archive – 15m downloads per month, 2m ebooks scanned,1,000 partners and other new facts

French Ministry of Culture and Communication releases ebook study

The French Ministry of Culture and Communication released the findings of a study they commissioned for ebooks.  IDATA conducted the study and collected data from June 2012 to February 2013 through interviews with nearly forty experts and professionals from selected countries (U.S., Canada, Germany, Spain, UK, Sweden, Netherlands).  The full report (in French) can be downloaded at: http://bit.ly/ZMlVLE.    The Ministry also published a short summary in English, available here.  Continue reading French Ministry of Culture and Communication releases ebook study

SmashWords research analyzes self-published book sales data

I finally had time to read this very interesting article in the Huffington Post written by Mark Coker about the  Smashwords study conducted to analyze self-published book sales data.  Coker highlights seven key findings from the study and includes his slides from a presentation at the RT Booklovers Convention earlier this year.  It’s worth a read if you are interested in self-publishing.

The seven key findings include:

  • Ebook Sales Conform to a Power Curve
  • Viva Long Form Reading: Longer Books Sell Better
  • Shorter Book Titles Appear to Have Slight Sales Advantage
  • How Indie Authors are Pricing Their Books: $2.99 is the Most Common Price Point
  • How Price Impacts Unit Sales Volume: Lower Priced Books (usually) Sell More Copies
  • The Yield Graph: Is $3.99 the New $2.99?
  • A Closer Look at the Yield Graph Reveals Why Indie Ebook Authors Have a Competitive Advantage over Traditionally Published Authors

For those interested in self publishing, Coker offers a free ebook, The Secrets to Ebook Publishing Success.

Credo’s student information literacy survey results now freely available

April 8, 2013, Boston, Oxford –   Credo, the industry leader for information skills solutions, today announced that the results of an information literacy survey of over 1,500 students from more than 400 institutions worldwide are now freely available.  Anyone may register for a free copy, along with a paper authored by Dr. Allen McKiel, Dean of Library Services at Western Oregon University at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Survey_Results.  Additionally, Credo will be unveiling results at ACRL during a breakfast discussion on 11 April 2013.

Continue reading Credo’s student information literacy survey results now freely available

Springer releases white paper on eBook use and acceptance in an undergraduate institution

Springer has released a White Paper on ebook use and attitudes.  The study was conducted at Wellesley College.  Deborah Lenares of the Margaret Clapp Library at Wellesley College, and Steven Smith, formerly of Wellesley College and now Head of Collection Management at Boston University Libraries co-authored the white paper.

More information, including key findings and links to the full paper, is below:

A new white paper from Springer examines eBook adoption at an undergraduate institution

Conventional wisdom holds that the availability of eBooks and their inherent utility – full text searchability, ease of access, etc. – are what drive use and acceptance. But are these the only factors behind the rate of adoption of eBooks at undergraduate universities? A new Springer white paper by Deborah Lenares of the Margaret Clapp Library at Wellesley College, and Steven Smith, formerly of Wellesley College and now Head of Collection Management at Boston University Libraries, draws on past studies and a new survey of users at Wellesley College to uncover some interesting insights for undergraduate librarians and institutions. The white paper is available both online, and will be distributed at this year’s Electronic Resources and Libraries (ER & L) Conference in Austin, TX. Continue reading Springer releases white paper on eBook use and acceptance in an undergraduate institution

Credo survey suggests students lack basic information skills

Credo Survey Suggests Students Lack Basic Information Skills Critical for Academic and Workforce Success

Survey finds 37% of students do not feel adequately prepared to start research

More information from the press release below.  Note the opportunity to attend an event at ACRL relating to the study as well as receive the full text of the study.  Links are below.

March 5, 2013, Boston, Oxford – A survey developed by librarians and sponsored by Credo found that many college students falsely perceive their level of information literacy. The data collected suggests that while students display an understanding of information skills, they are not successful at the next step —application of the skill. These information skills are critical to success in the classroom, but they also extend beyond campus to prepare students for success on the job and in everyday life.  Continue reading Credo survey suggests students lack basic information skills

New study shows kids ebook reading has nearly doubled since 2010

Scholastic recently released a new study on kid’s reading in the digital age.  The study found that kids reading of ebooks has nearly doubled since 2010. Full details are on the Scholastic site or you can download the full report with appendices here.

Below are some highlights of the study from the Scholastic site:

Kids, Families, and eBooks

Survey for librarians on personal/professional eBook use from Against the Grain

Against the Grain is conducting a survey of librarians’ personal and professional eBook usage.  The following survey is 24 questions long, and should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
Feel free to share this link with other librarians who may be interested in participating.

We appreciate your time and thank you for your participation!  Please contact  Leah Hinds if you have any questions or comments.

Sincerely,

Katina Strauch
Editor, Against the Grain

Library borrowers DO buy eBooks, don’t they?

OverDrive and the ALA conducted an online survey at U.S. public library websites in June/July 2012.  They asked a variety of questions, but the most important ones revolved around eBook purchasing.  The survey asked, “If a digital audiobook or eBook is unavailable in the library’s digital collection or there is a wait time, would you consider purchasing it from an online retailer?  53% said yes and 47% said no.  They also asked, “Have you ever purchased a book (physical or digital) after borrowing that title from the library?  Only 35% said yes, while 64% said no. Continue reading Library borrowers DO buy eBooks, don’t they?