Print on Demand

Springer’s MyCopy Service now available in Europe

Springer has offered the MyCopy service in the US and Canada since 2008.  It was so successful, they are now expanding the service to European library users.  MyCopy offers a POD copy to users at $24.95.  More from Springer:

After the successful launch in the US and Canada, Springer Science+Business Media has extended its MyCopy service with immediate effect to library users in Europe.  In line with this service, all registered library patrons will be able to order a softcover copy of a Springer eBook for their personal use by clicking on a button on the Springer platform www.springerlink.com.  The softcover copies are priced at a flat fee of EUR 24.95, which includes shipping and handling within these European countries: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK. Continue reading Springer’s MyCopy Service now available in Europe

Baker & Taylor’s POD service adds Wiley and Information Age Publishing

Baker & Taylor recently announced a partnership with Information Age Publishing  and Wiley (announcement) for print on demand services.  Using B & T’s Textstream Digital Print Service, over 1,000 backfiles from Information Age Publishing and a wide variety of backfile titles from Wiley will now be available POD for B & T customers.

B & T launched it’s Textstream Digital Print Service in the fall of 2009. Textstream offers digital print and bind options with a variety of options including: hardcover, spiral bindings, dust-jackets, and 4-color inside pages.

Bowker Report on Book Production – Non-traditional books surge

Bowker released a report today on U.S. Book production.  Among their projections:  U.S. book production in 2009 remained flat but 2009 was an extraordinary year of growth for “non-traditional” books.  According to the press release,  these [non-traditional] books, marketed almost exclusively on the web, are largely on-demand titles produced by reprint houses specializing in public domain works and by presses catering to self-publishers and ”micro-niche” publications.  Bowker projects that 764,448 titles were produced that fall outside Bowker’s traditional publishing and classification definitions.  This number is a 181% increase over 2008 — which doubled 2007’s output – driving total book production over 1,000,000 units for the first time. ”

Thanks to GalleyCat for the post.

FlatWorld Knowledge Partners with B & N and NACS

I am reproducing this post from the teleread blog, thanks Paul!

Flat World, the publisher of commercial open source college textbooks, had partnered with Barnes & Noble College Booksellers and NACS Media Solutions to distribute their textbooks to over 3,000 college bookstores for the fall semester.

These are pilot programs and will launch in August. The average cost of a Flat Word textbook is $29.95 which, they say, is 75% lower than most conventional textbooks. The bookstores will receive digital files and the college instructors can then remix, reorder and add content. The stores than will use POD to provide paper copies.

(sp) I saw a presentation from FlatWorld at the TOC conference and discussed them in my top 10 takeaways from the conference. They have an interesting business model, I’ll be anxious to see if they find success at the college bookstores.

College Bookstores to add Espresso Book Machines

Expect to find print on demand textbooks and other academic and trade titles available for POD in college bookstores very soon.  From a press release, “NACS Media Solutions (NMS), a
subsidiary of the National Association of College Stores (NACS) and On Demand Books LLC (ODB), the maker of the Espresso Book Machine® (EBM), have entered into a joint agreement
whereby NMS will market the EBM to the collegiate marketplace and permission academic content for distribution throughout the worldwide network of EBMs.”  No word on pricing.  Thanks to Teleread for the info.

10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Earlier this week I attended the O’Reilly Tools of Change (TOC) Conference for the first time.  Over 1250 attendees gathered in New York City to discuss and network   about issues and trends in publishing, in particular, digital publishing.  While much of the information presented was for the publishing industry, I did manage to find several great ideas and concepts that relate to libraries.  I’d like to share these with you, in no apparent order. Continue reading 10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

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Tools of Change – Making the Case for Digital Printing

Making the Case for Digital Printing –  Tools of Change Conference – Feb. 22, 1:30 – 3:30

Brian O’Leary and Ashley Gordon

This session was directed to publishers who are thinking about digital printing opportunities.  The speakers were obviously pro-digital printing and provided many examples of the benefits of digital printing for publishers.  But, libraries should take note.  Digital printing could be a good source of revenue for libraries who have large digital collections.  I particular like the idea of “chunking”  and creating keepsake books from public domain material (discussed below).  Consortia could purchase a POD machine and member libraries could use this for a variety of projects, just think of the number of digital collections in one consortia.  What great revenue!  The speakers discussed 3 overlapping segments in digital printing- digital printing vendors, onsite services, and author services

Digital printing is more than print on demand (POD).  POD is a strategy in digital printing.

Content: Think in terms of content, not the physical book Continue reading Tools of Change – Making the Case for Digital Printing

Nicolas Baker on the Kindle

Nicolas Baker, famous within libraries for Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper (2001),  has written an article about the Kindle for the New Yorker.  Not much surprising, general kvetching: the Kindle doesn’t work well with images, text to speach is not an audiobook, not every book is available, etc.  but I think it is interesting to see ebooks capturing such a large part of the popular culture’s attention.

The only part I think Mr. Baker missed the mark was in the reader chat forum.  A reader asks:

“Do you see e-readers, including the Kindle or even iPod, playing any role in libraries? Or perhaps can you foresee libraries having a role in providing content to such devices? Librarians have played a huge role in my reading life and I’m not ready to cede that role over to Amazon or bn.com at the moment.”

In his response, Mr. Baker mentions print on demand machines and then adds, “but if all books become electronic, the task of big research libraries remains the same—keep what’s published in the form in which it appeared.”

Library = warehouse

UM to sell digitized books on Amazon

First Google, now Amazon, UM has certainly got connections.  They announced this week a plan to offer book reprints for sale on Amazon as reprints on demand.  According to their press release,”The University of Michigan will make thousands of books that are no longer in copyright — including rare and one-of-a-kind titles — available as reprints on demand under a new agreement with BookSurge, part of the Amazon.com group of companies.  The agreement gives the public a unique opportunity to buy reprints of a wide range of titles in the U-M Library for as little as a few dollars. As individual copies are sold on Amazon.com, BookSurge will print and bind the books in soft-cover form.” Continue reading UM to sell digitized books on Amazon

Springer’s MyCopy Launches!

Pilot project successfully completed / Library users in the USA and Canada can order soft cover copies of Springer eBooks

Way to go Springer!  I loved this idea as a pilot, and love it even more now.  This is fantastic news for eBooks and end users.  I’ve never met an end user who didn’t want to push the print button on an eBook.  I wish you much success. sp Continue reading Springer’s MyCopy Launches!

Kirtas teams with OCLC to ease access to digital content

From Teleread.org

By Paul Biba

Picture 2.pngStill another digital deal being done. The more the merrier! From a press release I received from Kirtas:

Kirtas Technologies, the worldwide leader in bound-book digitization, and OCLC, a global online library service and research organization; have signed an agreement that will enable streamlined access to the ever-increasing numbers of digitized books to users of OCLC’s WorldCat and Kirtasbooks.com. Continue reading Kirtas teams with OCLC to ease access to digital content

Will Print-on-Demand Stifle eBooks?

There is a really interesting article (with comments) on the TeleRead blog about the Espresso Book Machine.  If you remember, UM purchased the Espresso back in October.   This new article, written by Court Merrigan, focuses on the machine’s use in bookstores – store front or in one’s closet.  It’s big in the UK, with plans to expand the 500,000 title Espresso offering even further if Blackwell can negotiate the rights to in-copyright books.

Merrigan ponders the future of bookstores, amazon, and the impact of POD to the eBook industry.  Comments from publishers offer even more ideas and perspectives.   One comment, from Michael Pastore, states “This machine could also be deployed in libraries, and help make some money for libraries, which are much in need right now. And independent bookstores might be looking at this machine reverently, as a mechanical messiah.”

Thoughts on the UM Press Digital Move

You’ve probably read the news about the University of Michigan Press going digital only with most of their titles.  They’ve decided to jump to the future business model ahead of many publishers, by going digital now, rather than later.  I like their reasoning for the move.  Phil Pochoda, Director of the UM Press was quoted in the Inside Higher Ed article to say “Why try to fight your way through this? Why try to remain in territory you know is doomed? Scholarly presses will be primarily digital in a decade. Why not seize the opportunity to do it now?”

Another reason for the decision was to increase the number of titles that UM Press could publish.  With the cost of printing and distribution, only titles that would sell, sell, sell were printed.  Publishing digital only means more titles from more scholars on more topics, not just those that fit the mainstream.  I think that’s good for everyone.

UM Press can also utilize the new Espresso Book Machine acquired by the UM in 2008 (see NSR post).  The print on demand (pod) machine has the ability to offer print versions of the digital titles for those who aren’t quite ready for the ebook world.

University of Pennsylvania to Digitize and Print-on-Demand

I read this article in LJ about another library digitization/print-on demand product.  This time it’s with the University of Pennsylvania (UP) and Kirtas.  UP is now part of the elite group of libraries providing print-on-demand services including University of Michigan, Emory, and Cornell.

The UP project will scan books in the public domain (200,000), but only when a title is requested by an end user.   So, it’s kind of like the Patron Driven Acquisition ebook model, but now it’s being done in reverse.  Take the print, digitize it, then print a copy on demand to ship to a user.  Price information was not listed on the UP Press Release.

Springer’s MyCopy….$24.95 and it’s yours!

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Springer announced it’s new pilot print on demand service – MyCopy –  for “registered” patrons.  The service allows a library’s registered patrons to order a softcover print copy of an ebook the library has ALREADY purchased.  The copy is to be used by the patron for personal use.  11,000 titles are currently available, assuming your library owns all of those!  Books are printed in black and white with a color softcover.

Publishing will never be the same folks.  I hope Springer shares the title data with libraries.  That could be a useful collection development tool.

I couldn’t help but think about this on the way home today….but wouldn’t this be the best way for students to buy cheap textbooks?  Libraries subscribe to the ebooks of major textbook publishers and they all do print-on-demand for patrons at $24.95.  Oh wait, we are talking about textbook publishers here, better make that $99.95!�

First McGill, now Michigan. Libraries in the Print-on-Demand Biz

I was envious with McGill’s news, and now Michigan!  Talk about rubbing salt on my wounds….

Seriously, this is fantastic news for UM Libraries.  Their new “Espresso Book Machine,” – and it ain’t coffee folks – will print-on-demand titles from the UM digital collection.  Public domain titles from the 2 million item collection will be the first shot for Espresso.  Books will cost around $10.00, but must be picked up in person, as UM doesn’t plan on getting in the shipping business.

LJ News has a nice story. For more information on the Espresso, check out On Demand Books.

McGill University to digitize materials and print on demand

What a fabulous innovation from McGill University.  They purchased a Kirtas APT BookScan 2400RA  and will be digitizing rare materials from their collection to sell via print-on-demand.  It’s fabulous to see a library embarking on a project like this, one that will bring income!  Wow, the envy I have…..

For the full story see the press release.