Category Archives: Independent Publishing

New Bowker report reveals self-publishing ISBNs climbed 8 percent between 2015 and 2016

Just in from Bowker:

New Bowker report reveals maturation and stabilization in the self-publishing industry

Since 2011, International Standard Book Numbers (ISBNs) for self-published titles have climbed 218.33%, according to the latest report from Bowker. A total of 786,935 ISBNs were assigned to self-published titles in 2016; in 2011, that number was 247,210. Continue reading New Bowker report reveals self-publishing ISBNs climbed 8 percent between 2015 and 2016

Welcome, local author. Your public library wants you!

As the indie author revolution grows, more and more libraries are providing services to them. Many libraries have extensive information on their websites. Pike’s Peak Library District sets an excellent example at https://ppld.org/local-authors. But, what do you do when an indie author/aspiring writer walks in the door and needs something he or she can carry home with them?

Many indie authors are first-time writers, especially those who write memoirs. They may be of retirement age and somewhat uncomfortable with technology. For instance, they would rather you give them information in printed form than refer them to your website. They may have an ebook edition of their book, but they paid someone to create it for them, and they do not understand library ebook purchasing procedures. They didn’t know your library had services for them, and you need something to give them so they can begin learning about the services.

Continue reading Welcome, local author. Your public library wants you!

What’s the best way to get indies into libraries?

Has one of your library patrons ever asked why your library had a Kindle bestseller title in print but not as an ebook? Maybe someone who preferred reading e rather than p? Or have you ever wondered the same thing, yourself, when you found an ebook you wanted to read but then found that your collection development people had missed it, or that they had trouble adding it to your collection?

In an earlier article in this column on indies in libraries we looked at indie authors whose ebooks have become bestsellers and discussed why libraries would want to add these to their collections. To summarize what we found, while libraries focus their acquisitions efforts on books from the Big Five, there is a parallel universe of publishing that generates bestsellers and sells them to the public. Some of these bestsellers get into library collections, but not all. The issue for libraries is acquiring as many of these bestsellers as possible to minimize their loss of patrons to Amazon and other ebook services that provide instant access to the titles.

These books are not the old-fashioned self-published books with bad covers and typographical errors that many library and publishing professionals still think of when thinking of independent authors and independent publishing; rather, these are professionally written, edited and produced books (mostly genre fiction) that have been published by highly skilled writers who take advantage of the new realities of publishing. They purchase the editorial and design services of publishing professionals through marketplaces, such as Reedsy, where they can contract for services from editors and others who are current or former employees of the Big Five. They publish and distribute their books on platforms, such as Amazon, that are built to drive sales for them. And they market their books through book blogs, store appearances, and direct email services, such as BookBub.

In this article, we will look at the practical aspects of adding indie ebooks to a library collection, how indie authors distribute their ebooks, and the channels that libraries can use to add these books to their collections. Continue reading What’s the best way to get indies into libraries?

Indies Unlimited, a one-stop source of reliable information for indie authors

You’re sitting behind the Reference Desk or maybe trying to slip unnoticed through the stacks on your way to a staff meeting, when an elderly lady or gentleman quietly asks for help.

“I am trying to write my memoir. I’m a retired (doctor, lawyer, construction worker—you know the drill, so fill in the blank) and I want to write the story of my life. But I’m stuck. I thought it would be easy. After all, I lived it. But now I see I don’t know much about writing, much less about getting published. I just spent $4000 with a company that was supposed to help me with the writing and then print the book, but all they did was type up my notes and print them on cheap paper with a shoddy cover that didn’t even show the photo I sent them for it. Now, what do I do?”

In your mind, the question is not only what does your patron do, but what do you do? The patron doesn’t need a referral to a long list of resources that might or not be of help, much of which is appropriate for published indies but not for novices. He or she needs direction to a reliable, trustworthy resource that is written for someone in his situation—the beginning, unpublished author. Continue reading Indies Unlimited, a one-stop source of reliable information for indie authors

Audio drama for education

Among real (physically present) experiences fewer and fewer children and youth meet in either entertainment or educational milieux is the live theatrical stage. While cultural doubts that widespread literacy could survive film, radio, television, and internet connectivity have been put to bed by the reality that each, turn, has increased interest in popular reading, attending plays has for many communities, become a non-experience.

Aside from the skills of actors and directors, set designers, and architects who have designed theater spaces to both contain and enhance unrelated stagings within them, the literary component of theater is unique in its genre qualifiers: the script requires dramatic interpretation by its actors and audience is an essential component to final production. That production gives the audience access to facts, feelings, and ideas carried to them from physical expression (typically physical gesture as well as human voice). In the case of audio drama, human gesture must be indicated through tone, pacing, and breathing on the actors’ parts. Continue reading Audio drama for education

Indie Author Day: Librarians and authors sound off on the benefits of participating

In anticipation of Indie Author Day 2017, to take place on October 14, this article will summarize what I found after speaking with several librarians and an author who had participated in Indie Author Day last October.

Four themes emerged:

  • The Indie Author Day name sends too narrow a message
  • Libraries need to do more, and earlier, promotion to bring in readers as well as authors
  • The most successful aspect of Indie Author Day was networking among the authors. In one case, this resulted in the founding of a writers group at a library.
  • …and what about paying the authors for the books?

Mel Parish, the author who organized Eastchester Public Library’s Indie Author Day 2016 spoke to me at length about her experiences with it. 

“It was good to get together with other authors,” she said. However, the name of the event conveyed the message that it was a day for authors, and not for  readers (and book purchasers). 

Calling it Indie Author Day sends the message that it is a day for authors, rather than for readers, so it attracts authors. At Eastchester, several of the people in the audience were actually either writing books or planning to, and they wanted to learn more about how to become an indie author. It wasn’t clear that the event was for readers as well as for authors, so people thought that it was especially for authors who hoped to get their books into public libraries, which can be difficult, since librarians see being published by one of the Big Five as the stamp of approval for a book, and they won’t buy books from the smaller independent presses or from indie authors. 

Continue reading Indie Author Day: Librarians and authors sound off on the benefits of participating

Self-publishing platform Pronoun adds Overdrive and Bibliotheca, expanding distribution to libraries for indie authors

Just in:

Pronoun, a self-publishing platform for easy ebook design, distribution, and marketing, now includes library distribution.

NEW YORK — June 7, 2017 — Pronoun today announced the addition of library distributors OverDrive and Bibliotheca to its retail distribution, which includes Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, and Google Play.

Authors are now able to add OverDrive and Bibliotheca as distributors when publishing on Pronoun, adding their ebook to catalogs from which over 20,000 libraries can purchase for circulation.

Library distribution expands Pronoun’s already easy-to-use self-publishing platform including free ebook conversion, Author Pages, book tracking, data-powered marketing tools, and one-stop distribution across all major ebook retailers.  Authors can set their own price for books distributed in library catalogs and can earn 70% royalties. Continue reading Self-publishing platform Pronoun adds Overdrive and Bibliotheca, expanding distribution to libraries for indie authors

Dutch startup Sweek—a free reading and writing platform—welcomes 100,000th user

From a Sweek press release:

Sweek, a platform for free reading and writing, has welcomed its 100,000th user last week, since the official launch at the Frankfurt Book Fair seven months ago. Meanwhile, readers and writers from over 100 countries are already using Sweek. Both aspiring and top authors have joined Sweek, and traditional publishers are starting to use Sweek as a talent-scouting platform. Continue reading Dutch startup Sweek—a free reading and writing platform—welcomes 100,000th user

Book of the Week: No Place for a Lady (Thea Rosenbaum)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. Books highlighted include a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

No Place for a Lady

About Author

Thea Rosenbaum was born during World War II in Berlin, Germany. She began her career as a stockbroker for one of the most reputable global investment management firms. She left that job to become Germany’s only female war correspondent in Vietnam, catapulting her to achieve her dream job to be a journalist and serving as senior producer for ARD German television for over two decades in the United States. She is a loving mother of two children and grandmother of four grandchildren. Thea is a proud US citizen since 2013 and lives in Florida.


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

 

Book of the Week: Nickerbacher (Terry John Barto)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. Books highlighted include a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

Nickerbacher

About Author

Terry John BartoNickerbacher’s award–winning author Terry John Barto is a director and choreographer of 200+ regional theater productions, industrials, television, and cruise ship shows throughout the United States and abroad. As creative director for Wings of Dreams Productions, he honed diverse ideas into compelling fiction family stories, wrote screenplays for animation features, and inspired a team of artists to develop dolls and action figures. Nickerbacher will inspire kids of all ages to dream big.

He lives in Los Angeles, California and enjoys pilates, yoga, and hiking with his dachshunds, Hunter and Mazie. Terry John Barto is also the author of Gollywood, Here I Come!


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

 

Book of the Week: My Guardian Angel (Hsiao-Yen Chi)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. Books highlighted include a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

My Guardian Angel

About Author

Hsiao-Yen ChiHsiao-Yen is an author, illustrator and graphic designer living in California with her husband and two daughters. She was born in Hong-Kong and grew up in Taiwan. She started doodling at a very young age and early on developed a great interest in drawing and painting. Yen has both BFA and MFA degrees in illustration from Academy of Art University in San Francisco . She has been publishing children’s books since 2010. She now works for Volare studio/Volotot as a graphic illustrator of children’s products.


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Book of the Week: Manly Manners (Wayne James)

In an effort to draw attention to quality self-published literature and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. Books highlighted include a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction. This week’s pick:

https://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/manly-manners-lifestyle-modern-etiquette-for-the-young-man-of-the-21st-century/

About Author

Wayne JamesSt. Croix-born Wayne James, “The ‘Bad Boy’ of Good Manners,” is no stranger to the worlds of style, diplomacy, and courtesy. In March of 1987, while in his last semester of Georgetown University’s school of law, James presented his first collection of fashion at the Anita Shapolsky Gallery in New York’s SoHo. One week later, Bergdorf Goodman bought the exclusive rights to the collection. In May of that same year, James went on to earn his law degree. In 1999 James was elected Senator of the United States Virgin Islands and served as Senate Liaison to the White House. (Wayne James is also no stranger to the world of controversy: In June of 2016, while in Modena, Italy, researching and writing volume three of the Manly Manners treatise, he was detained by Italian authorities acting on behalf of a request from the United States of America for alleged fiscal inconsistencies during his tenure as senator.  James has denied all charges, and the matter is being resolved in a court of law.)


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

If the only necessary people in the publishing process are the writer and reader, shouldn’t libraries serve both?

self-publishingThe concept of a public library as self-publishing platform for aspiring writers isn’t new and libraries across North America are steadily warming up to it, increasingly becoming the go-to places for aspiring local writers to produce, publish and share their work in their community and nationally. In recent years there has been an explosion of self-publishing platforms available to writers all over the Internet and several are used in libraries in the United States and Canada. The three that stand out include Biblioboard, Pressbooks, and Self-E (by Library Journal).

Stratford Public Library (SPL), Ontario, Canada, provides access to all three of these resources for its card holders who may use them through the library’s website. Clearly, the library is trying to position itself as the place where local residents don’t just get free books but also create them from scratch for free.

Just underneath the “Self Publishing Resources” heading on SPL’s website, one notices this quote by Guy Kawaski: “The only really necessary people in the publishing process now are the writer and reader.” Public libraries such as SPL are certainly making the necessary steps to stand as examples of institutions that serve the needs of their patrons in an age that transcends traditional publishing channels and recognize that emerging digital technologies are democratizing the written word like we’ve never seen before. They are making it possible for writers in their community who would normally not be able to get exposure to share their writing and possibly realize their greatest dreams and ambitions. Continue reading If the only necessary people in the publishing process are the writer and reader, shouldn’t libraries serve both?

Book of the Week: Bedtime for Buzzy (T.J. Hackworth)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent (aka self-published) literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights a wide variety of titles reviewed on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s (very timely) pick.

https://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/bedtime-for-buzzy/

About Author

hackworth

 

T.J. Hackworth is a writer of short stories and children’s fiction. His work has also appeared recently in the Wisconsin Review. He lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife and daughter.

 

 


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Ingram’s Consortium now represents over 100 independent publishers. New partners have just been announced.

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MINNEAPOLIS —Consortium Book Sales & Distribution, a brand of Ingram Publisher Services, announces five new publishers for the Spring 2017 season: Animal Media Group LLC, Cassava Republic Press, Hoxton Mini Press, Iron Circus Comics and Transit Books. All presses began distribution with Consortium on Jan. 1, 2017, with the exception of Animal Media Group, which began Sept. 1, 2016.

Consortium grew out of a small book wholesaling cooperative in 1985 to become a full-service distributor, earning a reputation as an advocate for independent publishers. Consortium now represents more than one hundred independent publishers from the United States, Canada, Europe, India, and Australia, enabling them to successfully reach the trade, library, and academic markets for their books. More information about Consortium is available here.

Book of the Week: An Expert’s Guide to Fashion Styling (BJ Wilson)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors around the world writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent (aka self-published) literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews of a wide variety of titles published on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s pick.


https://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/an-experts-guide-to-fashion-styling/

About Author

BJ Wilson

 

BJ Wilson, owner & founder of BJ Wilson & Company began her career in 1983. While working as an administrative assistant, she began consulting for friends and acquaintances who sought advice and help with their wardrobes.

 

 

 


 

About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Book of the Week: Tax Reform with the 20/20 Tax (James C. Tanner)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors around the world writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent (aka self-published) literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights a wide variety of titles reviewed on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s (very timely) pick.


http://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/tax-reform-with-the-2020-tax/

About Author

tanner

 

James C. Tanner is a certified public accountant with over 40 years of experience. He earned his undergraduate degree from Santa Clara University and his Master’s in Accounting and Taxation from the University of Denver. He currently lives with his wife in Colorado. Tax Reform with the 20/20 Tax is his first book.


 

About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Book of the Week: The Lethal Equation (Jacquel Clark)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors around the world writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent (aka self-published) literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews of a wide variety of titles published on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s pick.

http://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/the-lethal-equation/

About Author

Jacquel Clark

Jacquel Clark is a retired accountant from a Fortune 500 company who spent more than 25 years working for corporate America before becoming an independent consultant. Clark earned her undergraduate degree in accounting and her masters degree from Stetson University. She currently lives in Florida where she teaches finance and accounting courses at a local college. This is her first book.

 

 


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Book of the Week: The Vivisection Mambo: 125 Poems of the Neo-Realist School (ed. by Lolita Lark)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors around the world writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews of a wide variety of titles published on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s pick.

http://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/the-vivisection-mambo-125-poems-of-the-new-neo-realist-school/


About Author

LolitaLolita Lark has been editor of The Review of Arts, Literature, Philosophy, and the Humanities (RALPH) since 2000. She has published an earlier collection of poetry, and an anthology of reviews, articles and readings from RALPH that was cited by Kirkus as “One of the best books of 2014.” Lark currently lives in San Diego, CA.

 

 

About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

 

Book of the Week: Under the Pong Pong Tree (by Hal Levey)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors around the world writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews of a wide variety of titles published on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s pick.


http://www.blueinkreview.com/book-reviews/under-the-pong-pong-tree/

About Author

LeveyHal Levey is a Boston native and graduate of Harvard University. He spent a year as a visiting professor on the medical faculty at the University of Singapore. This experience gave him some of the background for his novel Under The Pong Pong Tree.

 


 

About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.