Digital Rights Management

Webinar Summary eBooks vs. Apps: Pros, Cons, and Possibilities

I attended the Digital Book World/Aptara webinar today -eBooks vs. Apps:  The Pros, Cons, and Possibilities.  My notes are below, summarizing the content.  Very interesting webinar and some really good content, eye opening for a librarian to see what features are being discussed for enhanced ebooks, brings back memories of interfaces past and present.  Slides are available – definitely look at the comparison chart, discussed below.

Speakers: Eric Freese, Pablo Defendini and Peter Costanzo; Moderator:  Guy LeCharles Gonzalez

enhanced ebooks – are easier to develop because it the preparation of a data file, usually less expensive,  based on a standard,  interoperable because they are built on EPUB, but some vendors will wrap DRM around them making them slightly inoperable.

apps – are programs specifically written for a platform and interoperability cannot be guaranteed; easier for the functionality to be successful by it required custom development expertise. Continue reading Webinar Summary eBooks vs. Apps: Pros, Cons, and Possibilities

Digital Book 2010 Presentations online

I’m a bit late with this post, but the IDPFs Digital Book 2010 Conference presentations are now online (have been since June 3rd – alas I had a vacation).  There are some interesting ones out there on:

  • the eBook revolution
  • ePUB
  • DRM, copyright protection  and biz models of the future
  • marketing and selling eBooks
  • digital magazines and newspapers

Some of these include the audio as well. Enjoy!  Lots of food for thought.

OverDrive – audio interview with Steve Potash

Last Saturday while exploring the ALA Annual exhibit hall, I had the chance to sit down and chat with Steve Potash, CEO of OverDrive.  There is always so much going on with OverDrive, and the interview highlights so much of this.  Have a listen.

Interviews with Steve Potash and over 20 other individuals are available on the NSR interviews page.

Mad World of eBooks – part three, ALA Discussion

See parts one and two of this session for more information.  The session was described by one of the speakers as “speed dating for eBooks”- evaluating the relationships between libraries, publishers, vendors.  Best thing I heard all day.

Group three – Becky Clark, Johns Hopkins, Alex Holzman, Temple UP, Rob Kairis and Kay Downey, OhioLINK Continue reading Mad World of eBooks – part three, ALA Discussion

Mad World of eBooks, part two – ALA discussion

For the introductory material on the session, please see part one of this blog post.

Second group – Lenny Allen, OUP, Erin Igoe, Cambridge UP, Tony Horava, OCUL, Joy Kirchner, COPPUL

  • Lenny – budget and workflow are concerns, always looking a year in advance.
  • Erin – CBO general ebook platform focused on perpetual access of titles; forthcoming developments – digital collections from Cambridge Libary, New Cambridge history of Islam; discussing the best use of delivering print materials in a digital format that will be most useful, relevant and user friendly.  Always looking at discoverability and functionality, they really want to be at the simultaneous release of p and e, it’s the workflow issue that is holding things up.  Lots of opportunities for ILL, PDA, metadata (better and more consistent fashion), use reports. Suggests that librarians keep pushing the envelope with publishers. Continue reading Mad World of eBooks, part two – ALA discussion

Mad World of eBooks part one – ALA discussion

On Saturday morning at ALA, a group of librarians and publishers gathered together to discuss the world of eBooks, particularly aspects of consortial purchasing.  Each hour of the discussion a panel of publishers and librarians was on hand to lead the discussion.

The event was organized by Michael Zeoli at YBP, Julie Gammon at the University of Akron, and Tony Horava at OCUL.  Michael began the event with general slides about eBook and print book availability and sales.  He also offered a few anonymous comments from librarians.  I’ll try to get copies of his slides to post. Continue reading Mad World of eBooks part one – ALA discussion

ALA Session – Challenges of Implementing eBooks for Publishers, Libraries, and End-Users

You are cordially invited to the Electronic Resources Management Interest Group ALCTS/LITA meeting at ALA 2010 Annual Conference in Washington, DC.

  • Program: Challenges of Implementing eBooks for Publishers, Libraries and End-Users
  • Date: Friday, June 25th, 2010
  • Time:  4:00pm—5:15pm
  • Location: Hilton Washington-Fairchild Room
  • Speakers: Aaron Wood, Director of Software Product Management, Alexander Street Press. Former Metadata Librarian and Assistant Head of Technical Services at the University of Calgary and  Sue Polanka, Head of Reference and Instruction, Wright State University Libraries Continue reading ALA Session – Challenges of Implementing eBooks for Publishers, Libraries, and End-Users

Articles of Interest

Some good reads out there in the blogosphere these last few weeks. Many of these are focused on the electronic textbook and/or implications of such.  Additional articles include analysis on the library and bookstore of the future and a comical video about digital publishing and DRM.

Bookstore of the future: Books Plus?

NYPL Joins HathiTrust, as Repository Expands and Brands – 5/27/2010 – Library Journal

BEA: Tomorrow’s Library in the World of Digits

The model digital library branch: Reality or just a wish?

Videos: Opposing Voices in Digital Publishing, DRM: Terms and Conditions

Academic e-books change students research habits

Best eBook News on Twitter

UC takes e-books for test drive

Business School Director: Kindle DX ‘Not Flexible Enough’ for Students

Will E-book Pressures Send Hardcover Prices Soaring?

Top eBook/eReader Trends of 2010

Really interesting lists of eBook and eReader trends on the Kindle Review blog (posted March 5th).  Some of the things I was happy to see on the list include:

  • Multi Purpose Devices vs. Dedicated Readers – Will the dedicated readers be able to survive?
  • Rise of ePUB
  • DRM – is it possible we rid of it? ….unfortunately that is followed up by Is it possible it becomes more onerous and widespread?  Clearly this is a trend that can go either direction.
  • Rise of eTextbooks
  • Arrival of Textbook Readers (Entourage eDGe or Kindle DX 2?)

One thing I saw that concerns me –

Libraries and the Kindle – Libraries are flocking to eReaders and eBooks in general and the Kindle in particular.

I hope libraries are looking at the bigger/broader picture of eBooks as well.  I’d hate to see everyone latching on to the Kindle when there are so many new multi-purpose devices coming on the market that allow much more flexibility in eBook downloads/reading.  (Ibis, Blio, Kobo are examples, but not all will work with libraries….yet.  OverDrive is also branching out into DRM free EPUB and PDF for viewing on multiple devices)

OverDrive offers DRM free EPUB & PDF and much much more

Received a press release from OverDrive announcing many enhancements to the OverDrive interface and digital content offerings.  The announcements were made today, just shy of the start of the Public Library Association Conference in Portland, Oregon.  Those attending the PLA Conference should stop by the OverDrive booth(2347) for demos of all these new features.  My favorite is “Open eBooks” – DRM free eBooks in EPUB and PDF formats which can be downloaded and read on nearly all EPUB enabled devices.  Here are just a few things mentioned in the press release: Continue reading OverDrive offers DRM free EPUB & PDF and much much more

Librarians speak up about Ebooks – HighWire Press Survey Results

It’s a popular day for releasing survey results it seems.  Earlier we got Aptara’s results from a publisher survey on eBooks and now HighWire has released a survey on eBooks based on librarian input.  The result are in the full report.

According to HighWire, the report espouses some familiar and consistent themes:

  • Simplicity and ease of use seem more important than sophisticated end-user features.
  • Users tend to discover ebooks through both the library catalog and search engines.
  • While users prefer PDFs, format preference will likely change as technology changes.
  • DRM seems to hinder ebook use for library patrons; ability to print is essential.
  • The most popular business model for librarians is purchase with perpetual access.

10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Earlier this week I attended the O’Reilly Tools of Change (TOC) Conference for the first time.  Over 1250 attendees gathered in New York City to discuss and network   about issues and trends in publishing, in particular, digital publishing.  While much of the information presented was for the publishing industry, I did manage to find several great ideas and concepts that relate to libraries.  I’d like to share these with you, in no apparent order. Continue reading 10 Takeaways from the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference for Librarians

Tools of Change – Networked, Mobile and Landlocked, Current Ereaders

Tools of Change – Networked, Mobile & Landlocked – Current Ereaders – Feb 22 11:45 – 12:30

Liza Daly and Keith Fahlgren

Requiem for an ebook shopper – consumer perspective on devices available

Liza showed a interesting slide with the interconnectivity (or not) by popular readers, very complicated to buy a book (consumer says, the hell with it, I’ll just buy a movie).  We don’t care so much about devices, it’s something that consumers will choose based on their liking.  What we should be concerned about is interoperability. Last year it looked like this would happen, but things have really changed. Continue reading Tools of Change – Networked, Mobile and Landlocked, Current Ereaders

Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts

Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts – Feb. 22 – 3:30 – 5:00

Cali Bush, O’Reilly Media – Cali is a non lawyer from the O’Reilly legal department.

Cali provided a perspective on eBook contracts from both the publisher and distributor side in 5 segments of her presentation.  While this was publisher/distributor specific, the terms and gotchas and gimmes are important for libraries to think about when reading their own contracts with publishers, aggregators, or distributors.  Cali referred to downstream rights where the rights going from authors to publishers to distributors decreases with each step.  This is an interesting thing to think about.  She didn’t include libraries or end users in her chart, however, but I would imagine they are even further downstream. Continue reading Tools of Change – Ebook Contracts

Tools of Change – Practical Ebook Formatting Workshop

Practical Ebook Formatting: Limitations and Optimizations – Joshua Tallent (Ebook Architects) and Phil Frank (Hendrickson)

  • TOC Conference, Monday, Feb. 22nd 9 – 12:30, Mariott Marquis, NYC
  • About 200 folks in the room, 1/2 do the ebook formatting on a regular basis, 1/2 are managing people who do this, and me.
  • I decided to attend this session b/c I know nothing about it 😉  Please keep this in mind as you read my notes. Continue reading Tools of Change – Practical Ebook Formatting Workshop

4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

Here is another blog post from Sylvia Miller, Director of “Publishing the Civil Rights Movement” at the University of North Carolina Press, summarizing a Charleston Conference presentation.  It is reprinted with permission.  (Thanks Sylvia, you are making my job easy!)

At the Charleston Conference, I attended an all-day preconference workshop on e-books organized by Sue Polanka of Wright State University (who runs the blog No Shelf Required), Carolyn Morris of Coutts Information Services, and Janet Fischer of Publishers Communication Group, Inc. I was especially impressed with the final talk of the day, given by Anh Bui of HighWire Press, Stanford University–probably because she said things that support the ideas in our Long Civil Rights Movement online pilot!
Continue reading 4 Principles for E-book Discovery & Visability

The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts

The following summary of the Charleston Conference was written by Sylvia Miller from the University of North Carolina Press, and author of “Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement” blog.  It is reposted with permission

Trains and battleships were two of the most telling metaphors that presenters at last week’s Charleston Conference used in their attempt to describe the strength, speed, and scariness of the changes currently taking place in academic librarianship and scholarly publishing.  The news media and press outlets that focus on education and publishing seem to regard 2009 as a tipping point for public acceptance and business success of e-books.   The speakers at this conference attended by 1,000 academic librarians and scholarly publishers clearly recognized that this enormous change is upon us.

In a talk entitled “I Hear the Train A Comin’”  Kevin Guthrie, President of Ithaka, asked, “When the tracks and the cars come up to everyone’s door, what happens to the beautiful old train station?”  He was of course referring to the impact of the Web on libraries, many of which may no longer be needed as physical repositories of content duplicated down the street, across town, and online.

Responding to this year’s conference theme “Necessity Is the Mother of Invention,” several speakers urged librarians to act quickly and strongly for positive change.   Ivy Anderson of the California Digital Library said that reorienting libraries toward the future was “like turning a battleship around.”  In an inspiring keynote speech, David Lankes of the Information Institute of Syracuse memorably referred to the dubious efficacy of “conducting exit interviews on the deck of the Titanic“!

Lankes urged librarians to recognize their mission “to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities” and become innovative, proactive leaders.  When I described the speech to a colleague here at UNC Press, she immediately said, “That could also apply to publishers!”  I told her that in fact the first audience member to comment during the Q&A session said exactly that.  In another plenary speech, Douglas Armato of the University of Minnesota Press concluded, speaking of libraries and publishers, “If we’re not dealing with this evolution together, we should be.”
Continue reading The Charleston Conference – top 10 thoughts