Digital Rights Management

Does DRM prevent eBook piracy?

No one seems to have this magic answer, but a recent article interviewing Brian O’Leary of Magellan Media offers some insight.  O’Leary described a 2 1/2 year study with O’Reilly media, stating:

“We undertook research two-and-a-half-years ago with O’Reilly, and we’ve been studying Thomas Nelson as well, to measure the impact of piracy on paid content sales. We approached it as if it were cooperative marketing. We would look at the impact of what sales looked like before there was piracy, say for four to eight weeks, and then we’d look at the impact of piracy afterward. Essentially, if the net impact of piracy is negative, then you would see sales fall off more quickly after piracy; if it were positive, the opposite.

Data that we collected for the titles O’Reilly put out showed a net lift in sales for books that had been pirated. So, it actually spurred, not hurt, sales. But we were only looking at O’Reilly and Thomas Nelson. The results are not emblematic of publishing overall. It could be more conservative, it could be less conservative. We just don’t have enough data. I’ve tried to get other publishers to join in, but it really hasn’t been a successful mission. Even at a low- or no-cost offer, publishers seem reluctant to collect the data required to reveal the true impact of book piracy.”

Later in the interview, O’Leary states, “Any good pirate can strip DRM in a matter of seconds to minutes.”  If you’d like to be one of these pirates, a recent blog post on WIRED offers step-by-step instructions on just how to remove DRM from eBook formats, compliments of the Apprentice Alf.

ALA TechSource Workshop on eBooks and Libraries

ALA TechSource is sponsoring a two-part webinar/workshop on eBooks and Libraries.  The details are below.  If you’d like to read an interview with Sue Polanka, the workshop presenter, it’s available here.

Integrating E-Books and E-Readers into Your Library (ALA TechSource Workshop)

With the recent explosion in the popularity of e-reading devices, many librarians are grappling with how to effectively integrate these devices into their services and collection. In this two-session ALA TechSource workshop, Sue Polanka will provide practical guidance on how to begin purchasing e-books for your library to lend electronically and how to purchase e-reading devices for patron use.
Continue reading ALA TechSource Workshop on eBooks and Libraries

Articles of Interest

Top 10 Articles of 2010 – Digital Book World

Amazon Kindle E-Reader Sales Will Keep Growing in 2011: 10 Reasons Why – Mobile and Wireless – News & Reviews – eWeek.com

Predictions for 2011 from Smashwords Founder – GalleyCat

How to add books to the iPad, iPhone, etc.

Check Out Library Books Using Your Phone – eBookNewser

David Thornburg on Open-Source Textbooks | Edutopia

Almost One-Third of Internet Users Plan to Buy a Kindle

Feeding Your E-book Habit: Borrowing From the Library — The …

Year One: The Born Digital Publisher – The Scholarly Kitchen

Go To Hellman: 2010 Summary: Libraries are Still Screwed

How to find free Kindle books

NOOK ereaders become biggest seller in B&N’s history

People will pay for digital content says Pew Internet & American Life Project

IDATE releases ebook report

Prediction for 2011 – The Individual Rules – The Scholarly Kitchen

Steve Haber: The Changing Role of Libraries in the Digital Age

Using Bluefire Reader to Download Library eBooks

There have been several blog posts this week about using the BlueFire Reader application to download eBooks from library collections to various iOS devices.  Josh Hadro from Library Journal has a great post with step-by-step instructions and screen shots.  Other posts, not as detailed as Josh’s, include:

CNet – Bluefire Reader brings free public-library e-books to iOS

Another post from the Download Squad site offers a brief description with a couple of screen shots.

Articles of Interest

Three misperceptions about the ebook business

Textbooks headed for ash heap of history?

A Student’s Stranded On A Desert Island … Tech Devices

Inside the Google Books Algorithm – Alexis Madrigal – Technology – The Atlantic

iTunes U Introduces Free eBooks: Download Shakespeare’s Complete Works

Joe Wikert’s Publishing 2020 Blog: eBooks: Lending vs. Reselling

Forrester Research on future of ebooks: $3 billion by 2015

Will Your Local Library Lend E-Books? (Or Can They?)

Library eBooks on the iPad/iPhone, no Sync Required – Library Journal

Kindle Facts and Figures (history & specs)

Charleston Conference, eBook Access Models and Technology

Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Digital Services Librarian at Southern Connecticut State University, spoke about access models for eBooks, specifically with mobile devices and dedicated eReaders. Lisa spoke about barriers to access stating that restrictive DRM, licensing, and incompatible formats are all barriers to accessibility of eBooks.  Additionally, devices all have different loading options. Librarians have to understand DRM, formats, and compatibility between devices in order to assist their patrons.

Lisa suggested we visit the M-Libraries site, where librarians are sharing their knowledge about ebooks and mobile access.  She also recommended a post from Stephen’s Lighthouse where he lists several sites that compare eBook readers. Continue reading Charleston Conference, eBook Access Models and Technology

Charleston Conference – E-Content Procurement

Cory Tucker, Head of Collection Development from UNLV and Emilie Delquie, VP of Publishers Communication Group provided an overview of the variety of ways in which electronic content is being procured in libraries.  Cory discussed several current driving factors for procurement including decreasing library budgets, the variety of business models available, and network level access and discovery of content.

Emilie provided several statistical charts to show the shift of ARL expenditures from print to electronic (estimated 80% on electronic by 2020).  She borrowed her slides from James Michalko at OCLC.   Continue reading Charleston Conference – E-Content Procurement

Articles of Interest

Macmillan POD Shift: Kiss Your Warehouses Goodbye – eReads

Kindle vs. Nook vs. iPad: Which e-book reader should you buy? – CNET News

New Attributor study on pirated ebooks – of dubious value

How Amazon is Winning the eBook Wars

Frankfurt 2010: Google Editions Makes a Strong Impression at the Fair

The Kobo and the Alex Ereaders Compared

Trying to borrow library e-books a frustrating exercise – Cover to Cover

Toronto startup cracks the electronic textbook – The Globe and Mail

Amazon Can Exterminate Everyone Else In eBooks

Barnes & Noble Launches Self-Publishing Platform PubIt | News & Opinion | PCMag.com

IGI Global offers array of eBooks, databases, and forthcoming library science series

I knew upon seeing the mailing address of IGI Global – Chocolate Ave. in Hershey, PA, that I would like them.  But, upon leaving the NY offices I was presented with a box of chocolates, and I liked them even more.  What I didn’t know but soon came to discover, was the enormous amount of eBooks, journals, and databases they have produced since their founding in 1988.

Here are some highlights of the products, available and forthcoming, from IGI Global: Continue reading IGI Global offers array of eBooks, databases, and forthcoming library science series

New Articles of Interest

Standards & Best Practices – Identifiers – Roadmap of Identifiers …BISG

Video – Students Love AccessMyLibrary School Edition – Gale/Cengage

Hands-On with a New e-Reader – NYTimes.com

Library Labs Turn to Their Patrons for Project Ideas – Wired Campus

Why Share Open Educational Resources? – College Open Textbooks Blog

Library can’t lend an eBook to Kindle user | StarTribune.com

Xerox to sell and service Espresso Book Machines

Kobo announces WiFi ereader – faster processor, new screen

Ready to ditch paper? Here are the top 10 e-readers

Kno announces 14-inch single-screen tablet

Amazon Patent Could Charge For Browsing A Book Online – eBookNewser

Amazon launches “Kindle on the Web”

Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Yesterday at the LJ/SLJ eBook Summit I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion of the acquisition models of eBooks for academic libraries.  We chatted about business models, workflow issues and their opportunities and challenges, the pros and cons of electronic access,and the future of eBooks.  I was pretty busy doing my moderating duties and didn’t get a chance to summarize the program, but luckily some folks at LJ did.  Here is what they had to say: Continue reading Ebooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice

Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets

A must read post from the Librarian in Black blog, Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets, offers a summation from 3 speakers at this event held in San Francisco on September 21st.  They include Paul Sims, Ann Awakuni, and Henry Bankhead.

A few clips from the post:

Paul Sims, “He believes that eBooks have the potential to disrupt our ability to provide access to collections. He quoted the ALA Core Value about Access: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” eBooks are preventing us from meeting this core value.” Continue reading Future of Libraries 2010: The Consumer and Library E-book Markets

LJ/SLJ eBook Summit Preview – eBooks and Academic Libraries

The LJ/SLJ eBook Summit on September 29th offers a variety of speakers and panel discussions relating to eBooks and libraries.  One such session, eBooks and Academic Libraries: Toward a New Best Practice, will discuss the myriad opportunities and challenges in purchasing, acquiring, and accessing eBooks in an academic library.  Speakers, representing publishers, libraries, and consortia, include:  Michael Levine-Clark, an expert on patron driven acquisition from the University of Denver, Emily McElroy, who heads up the eBook Team for the Orbis Cascade Alliance, and Brett Rubinstein, manager of library sales for Springer.  I’ll be moderating the session, live from 3:00 – 3:55 EDT.

Some of the topics our panel will discuss include:

  • acquisitions options
  • the role of aggregators and distributors
  • approval plans
  • managing duplication of content
  • Access and DRM
  • devices
  • shared collections
  • patron driven business models
  • future of ebooks

Librarian Speaks up about eBooks

James Mouw, assistant director for technical and electronic resources and the electronic resources officer at the University of Chicago Library, was interviewed for an article in the Chronicle this week.  The article, E-Books: What a Librarian Wants, discusses simultaneous release, DRM, perpetual access, and workflow issues.  James will be speaking at the Charleston Conference in November during the E-Everything preconference.  He will be one of the presenters discussing electronic content integration.

O’Reilly Media offers DAISY formats in ebook bundles

From an O’Reilly Media press release:

For years O’Reilly Media has supplied digital files of our books to Bookshare, a non-profit that provides accessible reading material to the print disabled. For qualifying readers, these ebooks are made available worldwide. And now, through a collaboration with Bookshare, we’ve started making the easy-access DAISY (Digital Accessible Information Systems) formats available within our ebook bundles on oreilly.com for more than 800 titles. Continue reading O’Reilly Media offers DAISY formats in ebook bundles

Articles of Interest

iPad, Kindle, Nook or Sony? What is the best e-book reader?

Ebooks: The $100 Sweet Spot has been Reached

Another Press Stops Publishing – Inside Higher Ed

Project Gutenberg: Timeline Events

Moving Tales: Do Animated eBooks Have a Future?

Sony takes on Kindle with next-gen e-readers – CNET News

Espresso Book Machine Spreads to Bookstores

Copyright, Ebooks and the Unpredictable Future | Digital Book World

Should You Buy an E-Book? – WSJ.com

All In the Delivery – Inside Higher Ed

Notre Dame Launches EReader Study…in Thrive Michiana

Articles of Interest

Hot reads this week.  Here’s a list of some good ones:

New from Bowker: Selection of Statistics from Consumer-Focused Research Report for Book Industry « ResourceShelf

The digital era has not made publishers defunct

Kobo Now Supports ePub and PDF files

Google Book Search beneficial to publishing industry, study shows

The ABC’s of E-Reading – Wall Street Journal

Virginia State University Business School Buys E-textbooks for Students

Ebook market share at B&N tops their print book share

BISG Study – 7% of eBook downloads are from a library

The Book Industry Study Group, along with a variety of corporate sponsors, launched a study in late 2009 about consumer attitudes toward e-book reading.  Consumers were asked a series of questions in Nov. 2009, Jan. 2010 and again in July 2010.  Some initial results were released during a twitter #followreader discussion hosted by O’Reilly TOC.  The following is an excerpt from the TOC post:  (note that “library” is reported for 7% of ebook downloads) (after original post found out that Kelly from BISG said that library downloads are so much in their infancy they don’t have a large enough sample.  They hope to do a survey soon regarding this.) Continue reading BISG Study – 7% of eBook downloads are from a library

Three New eBook Platforms Nearing their Debut

Great post in the Idea Logical Blog about 3 new eBook platforms – Google Editions, blio, and Copia.  The author, Mike Shatzkin, discusses each of the readers angles, pricing, content, and challenges.  Shatzkin’s final take, “So I think we can expect a multi-player ebook market, with some incompatible formats and a lot of incompatible DRM for some years to come. And the players currently in the game can expect their sales to go up but their market share to go down when the three new entrants join the fray this fall. That much seems certain, but very little else does.”

hat tip to @buffyjhamilton for the tweet