All posts by Mirela Roncevic

Weekly News Roundup [September 23, 2016]

end-of-week-e-news-round-up3

How a café in Croatia became an open virtual library (and what it teaches us about the future of books) (No Shelf Required)

Kindle Unlimited Funding Increases Slightly in August 2016 (The Digital Reader)

Research Tools: USDA Releases New Database with Nutrition Info For Over 80,000 Brand Name Food Products (Infodocket)

Kobo Aura 2016 vs. Kobo Glo HD vs. Kindle Paperwhite (comparison) (Password Incorrect)

The Kindle Reading Fund will make books more accessible around the world (Ebook Friendly)

Creative Commons licenses under scrutiny—what does “noncommercial” mean? (Ars Technica)

Download our new #Frankfurt @Book_Fair preview magazine free (Publishing Perspectives)

2016 Trend Report: What publishers need to know (The Average Joe)

Copyright Is Not an Inevitable or Divine Right, Court Rules (Torrent Freak)

e-Book Cover Design Awards, August 2016 (The Book Designer)

Comic Book Readers Still Prefer Print Over Digital (InfoDocket)

Facebook begins using artificial intelligence to describe photos to blind users (The Verge)

NSR Post: A time to soar above the level plain of tradition (No Shelf Required)

New Partnership between EBSCO and Mackin Makes Accessing eBooks Easier for Schools (Library Stuff)

Google Books will now make better suggestions on what to read next (Techcrunch)

Former Disney Digital Boss Says He “Loves Piracy” (Torrent Freak)

Keio University Offers “Introduction to Japanese Subcultures Post-1970” Online Course For Free (Crunchyroll)

Stop Piracy? Legal Alternatives Beat Legal Threats, Research Shows (Torrent Freak)

Students and universities set to reap the benefits of market-leading e-book pilot (JISC)

Aberystwyth University share their digital storytelling experiences (JISC)

News Roundup [September 16, 2016]

end-of-week-e-news-round-up3

Every Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world and from various news sources. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their organizations, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture.  Enjoy this week’s compilation.


Academic libraries are shrinking, while content is growing. How did we get here? (No Shelf Required)

Hop in and fire up ‘Citroen Origins’ virtual museum website (Autoblog)

80,000 Students Receive Digital Library Card (Good Ereader)

One of the most frequently overlooked cornerstones of effectively #publishing digital content is semantic tagging (Aptara)

Europe’s biggest and best digital publishing conference is coming. Here’s @philipdsjones on #FutureBook16. Join us! (The Bookseller)

Comic book readers still prefer print over digital (USA Today)

Bonnier Books CEO Jacob Dalborg: ‘Digitization Is Not Necessarily Evil’ (Publishing Perspectives)

Streaming, abonnement : 25 % du marché de l’ebook d’ici 3 ans (Hélène Merillon, Youboox) (Actualitte)

Amazon adds another Prime benefit: Audible Channels and free audiobooks (Techcrunch)

Bookboon Brings Free eBooks to South African Commuters (The Digital Reader)

Open Ebooks Announces Compatibility with Clever (Digital Book World)

Pearson, Follett Partner on Digital Textbook Program (Campus Technology)

Copyright reform fails EU citizens in favour of industry (Open Rights Group)

It’s official — ebooks really are books and Euro tax could plummet (Roger Packer)

A Promising New eBook Reader for Linux Appears (OMG Ubuntu)

Download: Publishing Perspectives Fall 2016 Magazine (Publishing Perspectives)

European Commission introduces copyright on links… that’s right, hyperlinks (Privacy Online News)

This Ebook Publisher Doesn’t Have Authors. It Has Writers’ Rooms (Wired)

Museum of Modern Art Digital Archive Goes Live Tomorrow, Thousands of Images, Documents Will Be Accessible Onlin (Infodocket)

Shelfie Announces Launch of Ebook Deal Finder (Library Stuff)

Paul Klee, for Kids | Touch and Go (School Library Journal)

Snakes, Mandrakes and Centaurs: Medieval Herbal Now Online (Medieval Manuscripts Blog)


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her creative and all things related to creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

Book of the Week: What Remains by Tracey Lee

In an effort to draw attention to quality independent literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers from around the world) and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews published on BIR’s site each week. This week’s pick is Tracey Lee’s novel What Remains.

What Remains

About Author

tracey-lee

Tracey Lee is a former schoolteacher from Southern Australia. After 32 years of teaching, she is now pursuing her love of writing fiction. Lee notes that she finds inspiration for her work from observing human behavior. Many of her stories relate to ordinary people and their response to extraordinary events.  The author received her Master’s in Creative Writing from the University of Canberra, and is currently living in New South Wales with her husband.

 


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

Academic libraries are shrinking, while content is growing. How did we get here?

 

zeoli-op-image

In this week’s opinion piece, Michael Zeoli (of YBP Library Services) takes a close look at how collection development practices have evolved in academic libraries in recent years, especially since the advent of the ebook and proliferation of digital content. Regardless of how familiar book professionals are with complex purchasing models in academic settings, it is important that we understand how we ‘got here’ before we can understand how best to move forward. We also must acknowledge that we all willingly participated in the creation of complex business models for buying and managing content. We must now all participate in simplifying them. The reality is, as Michael explains, that the academic library book world is shrinking, even as more content is created and new technologies are implemented. This raises serious questions about the future of the academic library and the roles we all play in shaping it. Perhaps the most important sentence in the piece is: “All parts of our ecosystem have an active role to play; none should act out of fear and remain passive.” Full article below. —Ed.


Academic library staff has been shrinking for 2 decades, while the quantity of scholarly content has grown exponentially.  In the 1960s Richard Abel & Company began the Approval Plan service as a systematic approach to help libraries manage the volume of new books published.  Libraries rely on vendor services (i.e., companies catering to libraries) to discover and acquire much of scholarly content.  Since the 90s, libraries have also depended on vendors to provide shelf-ready services for print books, customized cataloging, to manage financial transactions electronically, and to maintain online interfaces to support collection development and acquisitions processes.  Ebooks brought another layer of labor and complexity to library workflows.

Ebooks elbowing their way into the landscape

Within a decade of their birth, ebook aggregators entered mainstream library collecting.  Initially, the ebook appeared as just another format or manifestation of the print book; the library choice expanded beyond paper or cloth to include ‘e’ versions (in many cases PDFs).  Technology changed this: ebook models have upset the balance in traditional library collecting and continue to challenge traditional understandings not just of collection development, but of the role of the academic library.

The ebook aggregators’ business models exist outside the realm of print books – except as a distribution model on which to piggyback for just as long as necessary (think ‘the scorpion and frog’ fable).  The business of the aggregator is to sell ebooks, not books.  Aggregator ebook platforms are designed for this purpose.  Each is different from the others in design (technical as well as strategic):

  • User interface & experience
  • Library acquisition models
  • Library control of patron access
  • Publisher control over: 1) Library acquisition models; 2) License terms for each model; and 3)  ‘Triggers’ to purchase and loan (Patron-Driven Acquisitions – DDA / Short-Term Loan – STL / Evidence-Based Acquisitions – EBA)

‘Standards’ in the industry exist only to the degree necessary for one company to compete with another (‘not-for-profits’ are not exempted!).  Focus has been split 3 ways:

  • Competition to win market-share
  • Sustainable development of the market
  • Alternatives to ‘unsustainable models’

To a large extent, the futures of libraries and publishers live at the margins of these considerations.

Competition is driving complexity.  Beyond complexity, competition does not always favor clarity or transparency, even when possible.  Libraries and publishers struggle to gain full vision into some of the forces acting under the surface of a rapidly evolving landscape. Continue reading Academic libraries are shrinking, while content is growing. How did we get here?

News Roundup [September 9, 2016]

News Roundup

Every Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) and ebook supporters keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their organizations, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture. Here’s the thinking behind what we choose to highlight. Enjoy this week’s compilation.
New York: “Queens Library Launches Digital Archives” (Infodocket)

Preview ICER 2016:Ebooks Design-Based Research & Replications in Assessment & Cognitive Load Studies,by @guzdial (Computing Education Blog)

How to add fonts to the Aura One or other Kobo ereaders: Why won’t Amazon let us do this? (Teleread)

Major Publishers are hurting. It’s easy to see why: (Hugh Howey)

eBook pricing resembles three dimensional chess (Idealog)

Reabble is an RSS Feed Reader for Your Kindle (The Digital Reader)

BookShout and T-Mobile Partner to Distribute 237,000 Ebooks (The Digital Reader)

A Return to Print? Not Exactly (Bloomberg)

Whale Math: If Reasonable eBook Prices Devalue Books, Then What About This? (The Digital Reader)

New report by Bowker: Self-Publishing in the United States, 2010-2015, Print and Ebook (Bowker)

Start Saying Goodbye to eBook Pagination (Go to Hellman)

Kobo, OverDrive Post Instructions on How to Use Library eBooks on the Aura One (The Digital Reader)

BookShout Partners With T-Mobile to Distribute 237,000 eBooks (The Digital Reader)

Survey on E-Book DRM Licensing (Copyright and Technology)

Why PRH Sold Author Solutions: Business Dropped by a Quarter in 2015 (The Digital Reader)

Colleges making up English and maths GCSE shortfall given lifeline with free e-books (JISC)

Why the Hammer Museum’s new free digital archives are a game changer (Library Stuff)


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to books and all things creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

Unlocking knowledge means empowering people, and MIT is setting a powerful example

MIT OPenCourseWare

No need for an elaborate introduction here about what exactly MIT is doing by opening up their digital content online. Best to start by simply quoting Dick K.P. Yue, Professor at MIT School of Enginnering: “The idea is simple: to publish all of our course materials online and make them widely available to everyone.”

If you haven’t heard about MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW), here is the scoop. It’s intended not just to help educators at MIT improve curricula and make learning more effective for those enrolled at MIT, but to invite independent learners anywhere in the world to use the school’s course materials in their own educational pursuits and at their own pace. In other words, they are free to ‘take’ the course in the privacy of their own home by following full notes and having full access to materials every step of the way.

This is admirable. Truly admirable. And this is what the leaders among us who recognize the true value of digital content do: they open it up to the world. They eliminate all frictions and find ways to bypass man-made rules and institutions and simply make knowledge available to all. They have outgrown all unnecessary discussions of print and digital competing, and about complicated models that serve the select few, they recognize that unread/unused content has little to no value, and, most of all, they are pushing their own ‘institutional’ status quo by embracing the idea that learning never stops and that it is our collective responsibility to educate the world beyond the confines of university walls at a time when, despite all of the technological advances the world has seen, more than 90 percent of its population is not college-educated.

In a way, one can even argue that the same way the print book (the physical ‘paper’ object) is the container we buy, while consuming the content inside for free online (well, not really, but we hope to get there one day, don’t we?), the brick-and-mortar institution becomes the ‘experience’ we now buy (to directly engage with others, including professors and fellow students), while consuming the content (from course materials) online for free. So if we can’t afford to ‘be there’ in person, we can still afford to do it on our own terms.

Everything related to one’s ‘physical experience,’ then must come at a price, for obvious reasons: books must be printed (and before that, they must be written and produced); professors’ time must be paid, and the school’s expenses must be covered. In the same way, we are now able to listen to music for free online, while we must pay to attend a concert or by a CD or an LP (those of us who still collect them).

If we are able to recognize that digital content helps us open up knowledge to the world virtually while doing no harm to the ‘physical experience,’ we are able to create a circle in which everyone benefits. In fact, digital content and its widespread availability enhances the value of the ‘physical’ experience. All other creative mediums have caught on to this but books and textbooks. Initiatives like the one at MIT are a step in that direction.

Materials from 2340 courses are available, and the site is visited by millions. Each course includes lecture notes, slides, videos, instructor insights, Further Study listings, and much more. Here is a list of the most visited courses. MIT accepts donations to keep the operation running. For more info, go here.

Unlocking knowledge means empowering people not only beyond the university but beyond the borders of the United States of America. MIT is setting a powerful example.

Book of the Week: The Cannabis Revolution by Stephen Holt

In an effort to draw attention to quality independent literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights reviews of a wide variety of titles published on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s pick.

The Cannabis Revolution©

About Author

Stephen HoltStephen Holt, MD, has written over 25 books relating to medical issues such as aging, osteoporosis, weight loss, and sleep deprivation. He is the founder of Holt Institute of Medicine in New York and an emeritus professor.  Holt holds a medical degree from Liverpool University Medical School and is a board certified Internist and Sub Specialist in the US, UK, and Canada.

 


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

 

Who decides? [what, how, and when people should read]

This post, recently published on Facebook by NSR Managing Editor, was addressed to book readers (not book professionals). But publishers, librarians, authors, editors, distributors, and all others in the business of creating, selling, and managing books would benefit from asking the same questions. If for no other reason than for the simple fact that they, too, are book readers before they are book professionals.


locked up

Who decides?

In 2016, human creativity is exploding online. Right here, on Facebook. We admire paintings and sculptures from museums in far-away countries, we watch videos, share photographs, listen to music, read articles. Everything is within reach, and everything is free. At the same time, the world’s knowledge is locked up in books, which still carry a high price tag.

In 2016, every man should ask: Why can’t we read books freely online like we read everything else? Are publishers and librarians doing enough to maximize the potential of the ebook in ways we haven’t seen before? Is what we see in bookstores and libraries all there is out there to read? Should others decide what I will read, how, and when? Why are we talking about the love of paper and not about the love of learning and the ability to get to the right information at the right time? What if there wasn’t even competition between the two formats (print and electronic)? What if there was already a way to open up books online so that everyone benefits, including those who create them? How much do I even know about the technologies supporting the growth and development of ebooks as free mediums? Why isn’t anyone teaching me?

In 2016, every man should ask: Why don’t we have free access to knowledge and the written word online? When will we have it? And who decides?


Opinions my own.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and book reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to creativity, writing, and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

News Roundup [September 2, 2016]

News Roundup

Every Friday, NSR releases a compilation of news stories related to ebooks, epublishing, elibraries, and digital literacy from around the world. The goal is to help information professionals (of all walks of life) keep up with what is happening in the world of ebooks and econtent beyond the confines of their organizations, institutions, countries, and continents.

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of the most important news that occurred this (or any other) week. But it is a curated list, and a way for NSR to not lose sight of the big picture. Here’s the thinking behind what we choose to highlight. Enjoy this week’s compilation.
Belgians are Hunting Books, Instead of Pokémon (The Digital Reader)

Subway Reads Brings Free eBook Excerpts to NYC (The Digital Reader)

I’m blind. Kindle text to speech has been a nightmare to master—here’s how to fix this (Teleread)

France Passes Copyright Law Demanding Royalties For Every Image Search Engines Index Online (Techdirt)

Amazon Launches Telugu Language Online Bookstore (The Digital Reader)

Podcast: 10 Trends Driving the Future of Publishing with Mark Coker (Self Publishing Advice)

South Carolina State Library Adds Over 19,000 Documents to South Carolina Digital Library (Infodocket)

Independent authors are starting to outsell the Big Five (The Writer)

In-depth review of Kobo’s Aura One: It’s Pre-order Day #1 (Teleread)

Announcing 2016 Digital Book Printing Conference (Book Business)

Harvard Is Digitizing Nearly 40 Million Pages Of Case Law So You Can Access It Online And For Free (Library Stuff)

Diaries of General George S. Patton (1910-1945) Digitized and Now Available Online (Infodocket)

Kobo Aura One as a PDF eReader: No, Just No (video) (The Digital Reader)

Rx for the Kindle text-to-speech mess—to help blind and sighted alike (Teleread)

Cooper Hewitt Design Museum: Mass Digitization Effort Complete, More than 200,000 Objects Now Accessible Online (Infodocket)

Timberland libraries now offer access to self-published books (Publetariat)

Review Round-Up: Kobo Aura One (The Digital Reader)

Axiell and ODILO Offer Better Digital Content Access (Information Today)

ProQuest Introduces Enhancements and New Options for Books and Ebooks (Information Today)

Cambridge Core is the new academic platform from Cambridge University Press, launching on the 4th September. (Ebooks@Cambridge)

This Fall, we will partner with the French Comics Association to promote the #comicsframed festival. #NYC stay tuned for exclusive news! (French Culture)

Writer is Self, Author is Ego [and an Editor would like to apologize] (No Shelf Required)


Paul Biba is former Editor-in-Chief of TeleRead. For his curated ebook/elibrary/epublishing news, follow him on Twitter @paulkbiba.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to books and all things creativity and literacy, follow her on Facebook.

Writer is Self, Author is Ego [and an Editor would like to apologize]

Writer vs. Author

What is a writer? What does it mean to write? I searched high and low for answers, looked left and write, and came to this conclusion:

Writer is — any man or woman willing, learning, or already able to express him or herself through writing in order to grow spiritually, emotionally, and intellectually and to contribute to a larger community by sharing one’s own experience with others for the sake of augmenting collective consciousness.

What is an author? What does it mean to author? I searched high and low for answers, looked left and right, and came to this conclusion:

Author is —  a man or woman selected by an institution or organization to express him or herself through writing in order for that institution or organization to grow financially and through branding and to contribute to a larger community by sharing his or her experience with others for the sake of augmenting budgets of institutions and organizations and salaries (and titles) of those who run them and who deemed that man or woman ‘worthy.’ Collective consciousness also grows this way, but it is controlled by the institution which exercises tremendous power over that consciousness. This institution can be a private entity which first identifies the author (e.g., established publisher) or a public entity which, often in cooperation with an established publisher, chooses to nurture the author and the spreading of his or her message (e.g., library).

Writer creates. Writer is an artist. Writer is self. Writing is liberty. Writing is personal growth. That which is written only asks to be read.

Author controls.  Author is a brand. Author is ego. Authoring is power.  Authoring is institutional growth. That which is authored only asks to be sold.

Writer =  Creation. Art. Self. Liberty. Personal growth. Reading.

Author =  Control. Brand. Ego. Power. Institutional growth. Selling.

Author =Authority

[As concluded by a professional book editor and book reviewer who spent 20 years of her career telling everyone she believed that a) writing was hard work, b) not everyone can or should write, c) we needed publishers and libraries to tell us what is worthy, and d) being rejected by publishers and libraries means that you are less worthy and you should not write (and therefore not participate in creating). She would now like to apologize.]


Opinions my own.

Mirela Roncevic is Managing Editor at No Shelf Required. For all NSR-related news and book reviews, follow her on Twitter @noshelfrequired. For her writings related to creativity, writing, and literacy, follow her on Facebook.