Sharpe Reference now indexed in Reference Universe

From a Paratext press release:

Paratext is pleased to announce that links to the reference works from the Sharpe Online Reference collection have been added to the nearly 50,000 scholarly subject encyclopedias and other reference titles accessible via Reference Universe.    Sharpe Online Reference (SOLR) includes the titles that make up the U.S. and Global History and Culture collections. SOLR brings together award-wining subject coverage, the convenience and flexibility of online research and a fresh new approach to digital content ownership.

You can find the full press release here.  Additional information about Paratext resources can be found at  www.paratext.com.

Articles of Interest

3M announces Cloud Library e-book lending service for ’21st century’ libraries — Engadget

Mobile Reading REALLY Comes of Age — An Information-packed Slide Deck Worth Viewing « The Scholarly Kitchen

How To Download eBooks From Your Local Library – eBookNewser

8,000 authors choose Open Access and see direct evidence of the positive impact

Jailbreak Your Kindle for Dead Simple Screensaver Customization – How-To Geek

Cheap isn’t Always the Best Price – eBookNewser

eBooks: Smithsonian Libraries Converts Digital Publications for eReaders; Material is Free To Download « INFOdocket

News: A Hole Lot of Books – Inside Higher Ed

iPad, Tablet Users Prefer Digital Texts — Campus Technology

6 Companies Aiming to Digitize the Textbook Industry

ALA annual programs on e-Reference preservation and the impact of wikipedia

As you prepare your ALA Annual schedule, please consider the following two programs sponsored by the RUSA Reference Publishing Advisory Committee and the Reference Books Bulletin Advisory Board.
RUSA Reference Publishing Advisory Committee Program:
Reference Publishing: Preservation Trends & Issues – June 25 Sat 1:30-3:30
As electronic reference products transform to electronic formats, often with continuously updated content instead of one time publications, new challenges for archiving and preservation arise. Building on recent developments for archiving electronic books and journal content, this program will highlight the issues and challenges of preserving free and licensed e-reference content as well as foster discussion on possible solutions.
Panelists:
  • Heather Ruland Staines, Sr. Manager eOperations at Springer Science + Business Media
  • Ken DiFiore, Associate Director, Outreach & Participation Services,Portico
  • Marie McCaffrey, Executive Director, HistoryLink.org
  • Jacob Nadal, Preservation Officer, UCLA Library

Reference Books Bulletin Advisory Board Program:
The Wikipedia Effect: How Wikipedia Has Changed the Way the World Finds and Evaluates Information – Monday June 27 10:30-12 Convention Center 345

How have eBooks improved library service?

It seems like most of the blog posts, articles, and presentations on eBooks focus on the challenges and other negative impacts of eBooks.  I don’t deny these exist, but would like to turn some attention to how eBooks improve library service.  When people ask me why they should invest in eBooks, I always respond with a couple of standard responses – 24/7 access to content anywhere for your patrons and no shelf required.   Today I can add to that list – patrons are asking for them.  I’m in the process of writing an article for the Special Libraries Association about improving service through ebooks.  I’d like to include some specific examples of how libraries have improved service with ebooks.  If you have an idea or example you can share with me for the article, please let me know.

Some topics I hope to explore are:

  • eReference and virtual reference services
  • patron driven acquisition and short-term loans for just-in-time collections
  • 24/7 access anywhere including mobile
  • downloadable content for personal devices
  • embedding eBooks in content management systems
  • lending eReaders

OverDrive accelerates eBook distribution for K-12 and higher education markets

From an OverDrive press release:

Educational and academic publishers can now reach schools around the world with hundreds of K-12 and higher education libraries now in OverDrive’s global network. New eBook publishers supplying to OverDrive-powered school, college, and university libraries include Houghton Mifflin, Evan-Moor Educational Publishers, Kaeden Publishing, Barnes Report, and ALA Editions. They join Barron’s Educational Series, Inc., Disney Digital Books, Elsevier Science, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Scholastic, Taylor & Francis, and many others in providing digital books to libraries via OverDrive. Continue reading OverDrive accelerates eBook distribution for K-12 and higher education markets

Bowker study shows print is NOT dead

Received this via email today:  Bowker released its annual report on U.S. print book publishing, compiled from its Books In Print® database.  Based on preliminary figures from U.S. publishers, Bowker is projecting that despite the popularity of e-books, traditional U.S. print title output in 2010 increased 5%.  Output of new titles and editions increased from 302,410 in 2009 to a projected 316,480 in 2010. The 5% increase comes on the heels of a 4% increase the previous year based on the final 2008-2009 figures.

The non-traditional sector continues its explosive growth, increasing 169% from 1,033,065 in 2009 to an amazing 2,776,260 in 2010.   These books, marketed almost exclusively on the web, are largely on-demand titles produced by reprint houses specializing in public domain works and by presses catering to self-publishers and ”micro-niche” publications. Continue reading Bowker study shows print is NOT dead

2011 Salem Press Library Blog Awards – Vote Now

Salem Press has once again surveyed the library blog landscape in search of exceptional thinking, writing and information. After sifting through hundreds of nominations, our blog judges have spoken and their votes have been tallied. Forty outstanding blogs, five in each category, came out on top. We now need your help to narrow down the list of finalists.

To vote for your favorite blogs, click Blog Awards. And thanks for participating. Continue reading 2011 Salem Press Library Blog Awards – Vote Now

Articles of Interest

Mourning the Printed Book — The Aesthetic and Sensory Deprivation of E-books « The Scholarly Kitchen

10 Websites To Download Free eBooks – eBookNewser

The subscription model for ebooks hasn’t emerged yet, but it will – The Shatzkin Files

Best-selling authors criticize HarperCollins library ebook policy

Will Amazon make a tablet? ‘Stay tuned,’ says Jeff Bezos

Publishers should focus on customers, not formats

EBSCO Publishing launches mobile applications

I received an email today from Kathleen McEvoy at EBSCO Publishing.  They are beginning to release mobile applications, the first for the iOS.  eBook reading applications will follow (see last line below). More information is also available in the press release.

From the email: The new iPhone app is available free from the iTunes App Store and provides easy authentication for users via a library’s EBSCOhost profile.

The iPhone app introduces new features including the ability to view content in visual landscape mode and the option to save articles and PDF full-text content on the device for offline viewing. The app also includes existing EBSCOhost features such as limiting to full text, date ranges, peer-reviewed content or by publication. Continue reading EBSCO Publishing launches mobile applications

Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

From Eric Hellman’s blog, Go To Hellman – The fourth section my book chapter on Open Access eBooks looks at theier relationship with libraries.  I previously posted the Introduction,  What does Open Access mean for eBooks and Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books. I’ll be posting one more section, a conclusion.

Thank you for all of your comments; the completed chapter (and OA eBook) will be better for them.

Libraries and Open Access E-Books
One of the missions of libraries is to provide access to all sorts of information, including e-books. If an e-book is already open access, what role is left for libraries play?

Here’s a thought-experiment for libraries: imagine that the library’s entire collection is digital. Should it include Shakespeare? Should it include Moby Dick? These are available as public domain works from Project Gutenberg; providing these editions in a library collection might seem to be superfluous. Many librarians have been trying to convince their patrons that “free stuff on the Internet” is often inferior to the quality information available through libraries. There are certainly e-book editions of these works available for purchase with better illustrations, better editing, annotations, etc. Should libraries try to steer patrons to these resources instead of using the free stuff? Continue reading Open Access eBooks, part 4, by Eric Hellman

Interview with DeGruyter CEO, Sven Fund, about DeGruyter eBooks

Yesterday I spoke with Dr. Sven Fund, the CEO of DeGruyter.  News to me, DeGruyter has been publishing for 262 years! We discussed DeGruyter’s ebook program including their e-ditions program.  E-ditions provides “on demand” requests for digital or print copies of thousands of backlist titles.  Listen to the interview here.

Over 30 interviews with librarians, publishers, aggregators, and others in the information industry are available on the NSR interviews page.

NISO Launches E-book Special Interest Group

Great news from NISO about a new special interest group:  The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) and its Architecture Committee are pleased to announce the creation of a Special Interest Group focused on E-books (the NISO E-book SIG). Simultaneous with the formation of the group, NISO is issuing a call for participation in the E-book SIG and its associated monitoring group. The E-book SIG will explore a range of industry best practices and standards related to the creation, distribution, discovery, delivery, and preservation of digital book content. The primary responsibilities of the group will be to continuously monitor and review the state of the industry for e-books and to suggest areas for new initiatives within NISO or areas where NISO can engage with other communities on e-book work underway outside of NISO. The group will also host thought leader meetings and commission relevant research to advance the state of the industry. Continue reading NISO Launches E-book Special Interest Group

Open Access eBooks, Part 3

From Eric Hellman’s Go To Hellman blog.  Please offer your comments to Eric at the Go To Hellman blog.

Here’s the third section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; and What does Open Access mean for eBooks subsequent posts will cover Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the second section prompted me to make significant revisions, which I have posted.

Business Models for Creation of Open Access E-Books
Any model for e-book publishing must have a business model for recouping the expenses of production: reviewing, editing, formatting, design, etc. In this section, we’ll review methods that can be used to support Open Access e-book publishing. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 3

Articles of Interest

Archiving the Web for Scholars – (Internet Archive) Inside Higher Ed

Barnes & Noble to launch next-generation Nook May 24th | TeleRead

News: Picking a Fight – (Amazon and College Book Stores) Inside Higher Ed

Petition against HarperCollins ebook/library policy garners 53,786 signatures | TeleRead

Ereaders fail at education

UK publishers and libraries in talks over e-book lending | TeleRead

Self-publishing author J.A. Konrath to headline OverDrive’s Digipalooza 2011

From OverDrive:  Author and self-publisher J.A. Konrath (a.k.a. Jack Kilborn) will be a featured speaker at Digipalooza 2011.  Konrath has authored 22 eBook titles that are available through OverDrive public, school, and college libraries. He has sold more than 300,000 eBooks. OverDrive’s 3rd international user group conference will be held in downtown Cleveland, July 28-31, 2011.  The biennial event will provide hundreds of librarians interaction with representatives from HarperCollins Publishers, Books on Tape (a division of Random House), John Wiley & Sons, AudioGO, Blackstone Audiobooks, and Brilliance Audio. Digipalooza has been recognized as a leading forum for librarians to network and share “best practices” on maximizing the value and circulation of eBooks and digital audiobooks while interacting with publishers and industry leaders. Continue reading Self-publishing author J.A. Konrath to headline OverDrive’s Digipalooza 2011

Library Journal/School Library Journal 2011 ebook survey available

From an LJ email:  Library Journal and School Library Journal invite you to participate in our 2011 ebook survey. This data will allow us to trend the changing nature of library ebook collections. Survey results will be shared at our October 12 ebook summit and in upcoming issues of LJ and SLJ.

We want to hear from all public, academic and school libraries, even if your library currently has no ebook collection. You can view a pdf of the survey before answering (recommended!). Please click on the link below to begin.

Click here to get started.

If you complete the survey you’ll be entered into a drawing to win a Nook Color (2 Nook Colors will be given away) or a complimentary registration to our upcoming all-day virtual ebook summit on October 12*. Continue reading Library Journal/School Library Journal 2011 ebook survey available

University of Washington Kindle Study – Results in

A study of how University of Washington graduate students integrated an Amazon Kindle DX into their course reading provides the first long-term investigation of e-readers in higher education.

Details on the study:
The researchers interviewed 39 first-year graduate students in the UW’s Department of Computer Science & Engineering, 7 women and 32 men, ranging from 21 to 53 years old.

By spring quarter of 2010, seven months into the study, less than 40 percent of the students were regularly doing their academic reading on the Kindle DX. Reasons included the device’s lack of support for taking notes and difficulty in looking up references. (Amazon Corp., which makes the Kindle DX, has since improved some of these features.) Continue reading University of Washington Kindle Study – Results in

Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

Reprinted from the Go To Hellman blog from Eric Hellman.  Here’s the second section of my draft of a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. I previously posted the introduction; subsequent posts will include sections on Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”. The comments on the first section have been really good; please don’t stop!  Comments can be directed to Eric via the Go To Hellman blog.

What does Open Access mean for e-books?
There are varying definitions for the term “open access”, even for journal articles. For the moment, I will use this as a lower-case term broadly to mean any arrangement that allows for people to read a book without paying someone for the privilege. At the end of the section, I’ll capitalize the term. Although many e-books are available for free in violation of copyright laws, I’m excluding them from this discussion.

Public Domain
The most important category of open access for books is work that has entered the public domain. In the US, all works published before 1923 have entered the public domain, along with works from later years whose registration was not renewed. Works published in the US from 1923-1963 entered the public domain 28 years after publication unless the copyright registration was renewed. Public domain status depends on national law, and a work may be in the public domain in some countries but not in others. The rules of what is in and out of copyright can be confusing and sometimes almost impossible to determine correctly. Continue reading Open Access eBooks, Part 2. What does Open Access Mean for e-books?

ebrary launches use-triggered short-term loans

From an ebrary press release:  ebrary®, a leading provider of e-books and research technology, today announced the availability of usage-triggered Short-Term Loans.  Currently in beta, this groundbreaking model provides libraries with all of the benefits of traditional short-term loans with the added advantage of only paying if titles are used.

ebrary’s new Short-Term Loans can be a library’s standalone cost-saving service, or used in conjunction with ebrary’s Patron Driven Acquisition program to offer an additional layer of mediation before titles are triggered for purchase.  As YBP’s preferred e-book vendor, ebrary also makes Short-Term Loans available through YBP’s Demand Driven Acquisition service. Continue reading ebrary launches use-triggered short-term loans

Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session

On Tuesday, May 3rd I recorded a 15 minute segment for the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education on Think TV, the local public television station in Dayton, Ohio.  My topic was the rise of digital textbooks and options available for students and faculty to access and produce textbooks and learning materials.  Below is a snapshot of my general comments with links to various sources for more information.

Our current textbook system is broken.  We have arrived at $200 textbooks and have students who cannot afford them.  As a result, students try to borrow a textbook from the library or a friend (sometimes the older edition), purchase a used one, or go without.  Neither of these options provides revenue to the publisher, thus resulting in higher price points in an effort to recover the costs or production.   What can we do about this catch 22? Continue reading Digital Textbooks and Open Educational Resources – Summary of SOCHE Think TV session