Articles of Interest – Kindle edition

A summary of the various articles about Amazon’s announcement to work with libraries via OverDrive, plus a couple of others on Amazon.

Kindle Library Lending and OverDrive – What it means for libraries and schools – OverDrive blog post

Amazon to Allow Library Lending of Kindle Books (Updated) Library Journal

Librarian’s Hope for a “Seamless Experience” with Amazon Kindle – Library Journal

Amazon Continues to Push Book innovation with Library Lending and Ad-Supported Kindles – Scholarly Kitchen

After Kindle Lending, the Deluge « LJ Insider

Amazon to launch library lending for Kindle books – USATODAY.com

Kindle Library Lending Announcement Raises Questions – Information Today

Library eBooks Coming to the Kindle – eBookNewser

Amazon To Bring Ebook Lending to Local Libraries – Mashable

Kinboox – New eBook Lending Site Launched – eBookNewser

SEC is Investigating Amazon About the Sales Tax Disputes – eBookNewser

Achtung! German Kindle Store Opens – eBookNewser

Articles of Interest

Apologies for the long list, I’ve been away for a week and lots has happened!

Ingram Announces New Library Ebook Access Model and Audiobook Shift

In the era of ebooks, what is a book worth (I)

Is signing with a mainstream publisher now a mistake?

Digital book subscriptions, by Jane Litte

Publishers Weekly: Librarians at the Gate

HathiTrust: A Research Library at Web Scale – from InfoDocket

Reflections on Google Book Search – The Scholarly Kitchen

AcademicPub Opens Custom Textbook-Building to Faculty …

California Bill Would Offer Clear Protection for Digital Reading Records

Six Reasons Google Books Failed by Robert Darnton | NYRBlog | The New York Review of Books

Nook Friends is a Shot Across the Bow of eBook Lending Sites – eBookNewser

Sixty Percent of iPad Owners Read eBooks on Their iPad – eBookNewser

Hands on With Sony’s S1, S2 Tablet PCs

News: No Room for Books – Inside Higher Ed

This Week in Libraries: Interview with Sarah Houghton-Jan about ebooks

OnCampus Research: “E-Books, E-Readers Begin to Catch on with College Crowd”

Flat World Knowledge releases Make It Your Own platform

Reprinted in full from Information Today NewsBreaks, by Paula Hane.

Flat World Knowledge, a publisher of free and open college textbooks for students, announced the release of a new platform called MIYO (Make It Your Own). The fully-automated system gives professors greater control over textbook content, and the ability, with one click, to make their modified book available to students free online or in multiple, low-cost digital and print formats.

MIYO (mee-oh) transforms a static textbook into an adaptable learning platform by combining a digital-first architecture with Flat World’s open licensing model that grants faculty the right to revise, remix and share its textbooks. The new system uses familiar drag-and-drop and click features that allow instructors to easily move or delete chapters and sections; upload Word and PDF documents; add notes and exercises; insert video and hyperlinks; edit sentences; and incorporate other content that is free to reuse under a Creative Commons open license. Continue reading Flat World Knowledge releases Make It Your Own platform

Credo Reference adds Salem Press Collection

From a Credo Reference press release:  Credo Reference, the award-winning online reference service, is pleased to announce the launch of an in-depth new Publisher Collection from Salem Press.

Joining a growing list of 33 other Publisher Collections, all available stand-alone or alongside a subscription to Credo General Reference, the new Salem Press Collection will be offered as perpetual purchase or on a subscription basis.

This new Collection features key titles from both the Critical Surveys of Literature series (guides covering the major writers of world literature) and the Great Lives from History series (detailing the biographies of important people throughout history). Filled with vital content, and including 54 volumes from 13 titles, the Salem Press Publisher Collection offers: Continue reading Credo Reference adds Salem Press Collection

Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

No Shelf Required: E-books in LibrariesI’ve been working on on a book chapter for a book edited by No Shelf Required‘s Sue Polanka. My chapter covers “Open Access E-Books”. Over the next week or two, I’ll be posting drafts for the chapter on the blog. Many readers know things that I don’t about this area, and I would be grateful for their feedback and corrections. Today, I’ll post the introduction, subsequent posts will include sections on Types of Open Access E-Books, Business Models for Open Access E-Books, and Open Access E-Books in Libraries. Note that while the blog always uses “ebook” as one word, the book will use the hyphenated form, “e-book”.

Open Access E-Books

As e-books emerge into the public consciousness, “Open Access”, a concept already familiar to scholarly publishers and academic libraries, will play an increasing role for all sorts of publishers and libraries. This chapter discusses what Open Access means in the context of e-books, how Open Access e-books can be supported, and the roles that Open Access e-books will play in libraries and in our society.

The Open Access “Movement”

Authors write and publish because they want to be read. Many authors also want to earn a living from their writing, but for some, income from publishing is not an important consideration. Some authors, particularly academics, publish because of the status, prestige, and professional advancement that accrue to authors of influential or groundbreaking works of scholarship. Academic publishers have historically taken advantage of these motivations to create journals and monographs consisting largely of works for which they pay minimal royalties, or more commonly, no royalties at all. In return, authors’ works receive professional review, editing, and formatting. Works that are accepted get placement in widely circulated journals and monograph catalogs. Continue reading Open Access E-books Part One, from Eric Hellman

University of Michigan Library opens ECCO – Eighteenth Century Collections Online to the public

The University of Michigan Library is opening to the public 2,229 searchable keyed-text editions of books from Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO).  The texts are available to the public at no cost.

ECCO is a research database containing significant English- and foreign-language titles printed in the United Kingdom during the 18th century and important works from the America The database is published by Gale, part of Cengage Learning.

The texts typed by the Text Creation Partnership, range from Pope’s “Essay on Man” to a “Discourse addressed to an Infidel Mathematician.”  The Text Creation Partnership (TCP) produced the keyed texts in collaboration with Gale, which provided page images for keying and is permitting the release of the keyed texts in support of the Library’s commitment to the creation of open access cultural heritage archives. Continue reading University of Michigan Library opens ECCO – Eighteenth Century Collections Online to the public

No Way! Kindle owners CAN borrow books from public libraries

I never thought I’d see the day!  Great news Amazon and OverDrive. News release from Kindle here.

From a Publishers Weekly article:  Amazon announced this morning that Kindle owners will soon be able to borrow books from public libraries. Working with vendor OverDrive, which manages e-book lending for the vast majority of public libraries, the deal will make thousands of titles available via more than 11,000 of OverDrive’s public library partners. To date, Kindle has been noticeably absent from library lending, as OverDrive’s service worked only with ePub-enabled devices, including the Sony Reader, the Nook, iPads, and smartphones. Amazon officials said that with Kindle Library Lending, library-ebooks managed by OverDrive will now be available for all generations of Kindle devices and for use with free Kindle reading apps on most other devices, including Android, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone.

The service will launch later this year.

OverDrive Apps for Android and iOS Updated

From an OverDrive blog post:

OverDrive has made some enhancements to the apps for Android and iOS.  They include:

OverDrive Media Console for Android (v2.2)

  • Sepia display option for eBooks
  • Screen-dimming override for eBooks
  • Faster EPUB performance
  • Sleep timer for audiobooks

OverDrive Media Console for iPhone/iPad (v2.2.1)

  • Orientation lock for eBooks
  • Night mode and sepia display option for eBooks
  • Screen lock override for eBooks
  • Improved range of font size settings
  • In-app library “Website Finder”

Argentine Library Association Conference -eBook Highlights

Today I presented at the Argentine Library Association Conference about ebooks in US Libraries, thanks to an invitation from the American Embassy (in Buenos Aires) Information Resource Center.  I offered information about purchasing and accessing eBooks and about lending eReaders in libraries.  But, I learned quite a bit in return!  For example, no one who attended my presentation (about 80 librarians) offered ebooks in their library.  Also, only 2 of the attendees owned an eReader (one Kindle and one iPad if you are counting).  Why?  There just are not many Spanish language eBooks available for libraries and the format has not become as popular yet.   I expect this will change soon, as more publishers offer eBooks and US publishers move into the South American market. Continue reading Argentine Library Association Conference -eBook Highlights

Print alive and well at the Buenos Aires Book Fair

Today I had my first glimpse of the Buenos Aires Book Fair (Feria del Libro).  I’ve never attended a book fair, so it was very exciting to see the rows and rows of publishers and other information providers with their booths and offerings.  It is similar to an ALA conference exhibit, but the focus here is truly on books!  Publishers have shelves and boxes of printed books for sale during the book fair and are expecting over 1 million visitors during the 3 week event.  According to my local host, Jorge Rodriguez, Director of the Information Resource Center (IRC) at the US Embassy in Buenos Aires, the fair attracts the people of Argentina and surrounding areas, not just publishers.  It is such a cultural event for the people of Argentina, who are very attached to reading and books.  The love of books is apparent while walking around the city of Buenos Aires – independent bookstores are on every street!

The IRC of the US Embassy in Buenos Aires also has a booth at the fair and their theme is the evolution of the book.  They have a variety of print sources, but are also displaying ebook readers and tablet devices as well.  Their booth is all white, with flowing white canvas pieces hanging from floor to ceiling.  From a distance, it reminds me of book pages turning in the breeze.

More to follow, including pictures!

NSR is headed to the 33rd Buenos Aires International Book Fair

On Sunday I’m headed to Buenos Aires to attend the Buenos Aires International Book Fair, and in particular, the Argentine Library Association Annual Conference.  I’m very excited to have this opportunity to learn more about libraries, publishing and eBooks in Argentina and South America.  While there, I will be presenting a couple of session on ebooks in US libraries and reference services in academic libraries.  I hope to share some of what I learn about ebooks in South America on the blog, particularly information on the US Embassy Information Resource Centers.  Stay tuned for more information, photos, and perhaps an audio interview.

Ciao

Articles of Interest

eBook Tops All Trade Publishing Categories in February – eBookNewser

World Book Mobile Launched

Libraries and E-Content: Toward a More Universal Design

Copyright Office submission to Congress: analysis of digitization and legal framework of the Google case

David Rothman speculates On A Two Part National Digital Library

More Graphic Textbooks from Flat World Knowledge

The End of Content Ownership | Lance Ulanoff | PCMag.com

Could you create an open textbook?

Inkling: Changing the Textbook Industry — with the iPad – Tom …

CQ Press takes traditional print directories to a new level with First Street

First Streetâ„¢ was launched this month by CQ Press. The new database takes data from 20 years of CQ Press print directories and a variety of other political resources and cross references them for relationships.  They have a visual aspect as well, called coalition builder.  It’s fascinating to see how traditional print reference directories have come to new life in online databases.  More information on First Street is available in an article from Information Today.

World Book content searchable on EBSCO Discovery Service

From an EBSCO press release:  A recent agreement between EBSCO Publishing (EBSCO) and World Book, Inc. (World Book) will bring twelve popular reference tools into EBSCO Discovery Service™ (EDS). Metadata, including full-text searching, for World Book resources will be added to the EDS Base Index allowing the World Book content to better impact searching through the EDS single search interface. The twelve World Book resources that will be searchable in EDS include popular English language titles as well as French and Spanish language reference tools.

The titles include:  World Book Kids, World Book Student, World Book Advanced, World Book Discoverer, World Book Online for Kids, World Book Online Info Finder, World Book Online Reference Center, Living Green, Early People, Inventions & Discoveries as well as the French and Spanish language reference tools, L’Encyclopedie Decoverte & Enciclopedia Estudantil Hallazagos Continue reading World Book content searchable on EBSCO Discovery Service

EQUACC issues interim report

The Equitable Access to Electronic Content (EQUACC) Task Force met for the first time at a meeting held at ALA Midwinter and had a more substantive session at a one-and-a-half day retreat at the Washington Office, March 7-8, 2011.  The retreat happened to coincide with the announcement that HarperCollins would limit loans for its e-books.  Throughout the retreat, the significance of the HarperCollins decision factored into most of the discussions.  In addition to addressing this timely issue, the Task Force made significant progress toward identifying challenges and solutions for improved electronic access, use, distribution, and preservation.  The Task Force focused on long-term strategic issues given that there could easily be a situation similar to the HarperCollins decision in the future and ALA must be prepared to respond effectively.

The interim report is available here.

Articles of Interest

Forget Netflix. E-book Publishers Need a Hulu: Tech News and …

Streaming or Buying Books: Will Readers Choose a Subscription Model for E-Books?

O’Reilly to Go Print on Demand – eBookNewser

We can surmise that e-book sales may be responsible for the steep downturns in the US and UK – Futurebook

Intel Capital, Condé Nast Owner Invest $30 Million in Kno; Intel to Consult on Student Tablet Hardware

At #LBF11: 24symbols – the Spotify Model for Books

24Symbols to launch ebook subscription service in June

Spanish Start-Up To Launch “Spotify For Books”

Kno secures $30 million in funding, leaves hardware business

Books | Libraries, publishers armed for e-book showdown | Seattle Times Newspaper

Might e-readers replace vanishing libraries?

Google Who? – Inside Higher Ed

Booked! Libraries, eBooks and Their Collections!

OCLC and Ingram to launch 9 day eBook loans for 15% of MyiLibrary eBook price

DUBLIN, Ohio, April 11, 2011—OCLC and Ingram Content Group Inc. will soon offer a new service option that will provide library users short-term access to e-books not in their collection through WorldCat Resource Sharing and ILLiad.

The new service option, to launch in the coming months, expands access to library content available through WorldCat Resource Sharing to include access to e-books from Ingram’s MyiLibrary e-book collection for a period of up to nine days. E-book loans are fee-based, set at 15 percent of the MyiLibrary price for access to the e-book. The fee is managed through the WorldCat Resource Sharing interlibrary loan Fee Management feature, a service that supports payment of resource-sharing services through the library’s OCLC invoice. Continue reading OCLC and Ingram to launch 9 day eBook loans for 15% of MyiLibrary eBook price

Worldreader, making digital books available in the developing world

Worldreader is a very interesting non-profit venture to get e-reading devices to those in developing countries.  Very similar to the one laptop per child concept.  Here’s the information from their about page:

Worldreader.org’s mission is to make digital books available to all in the developing world, enabling millions of people to improve their lives.  We identify schools, train teachers, work with communities, and partner with publishers to bring millions of books to underserved children and families in the developing world. Continue reading Worldreader, making digital books available in the developing world

OhioLINK receives $750,000 EDUCAUSE grant for multimedia course material

OhioLINK has been named a recipient of a $750,000 grant from Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC), a new initiative focused on identifying and scaling technology-enabled approaches to dramatically improve college readiness and completion, especially for low-income young adults. OhioLINK’s winning project will build off of its successful Ohio Digital Bookshelf program by creating multimedia and self-assessment tools to help students succeed in fundamental math and applied engineering courses. OhioLINK’s proposal was one of 29 recipients chosen out of 600 pre-proposals and 50 finalists. Continue reading OhioLINK receives $750,000 EDUCAUSE grant for multimedia course material

“26” not set-in stone, OverDrive challenged on access fees

Two great articles in Library Journal yesterday.  The first article summarized the comments of Josh Marwell, president of sales at Harper Collins regarding the 26 check-out rule.  Marwell sat on a panel as part of “eBooks: Collections at the Crossroads,” a symposium organized by the Connecticut Library Consortium (#clctrendspotting, #clcebooks).

Clip from article:

“Is 26 set in stone? No. It’s our number for now, but we want to hear back. Immediately. Honestly, it doesn’t make sense that one size fits all. We consider it a work in progress. But this is the number that we have now,” he said.

“I invite you to test the water. Use it. Give us feedback. We’re in the water. We want to be here,” he said, noting that the company wants to sell ebooks to libraries and has been doing so for ten years. Marwell pointed out that HarperCollins has been hearing “quietly” from some librarians who are going to see how the new policy works for them.

“We try to be intelligent about our policy,” he said. “And when we landed on 26, the information that we had was that most books don’t circulate 26 times. In terms of the long tail, this particular number probably works for a different part of the collection. We realize it doesn’t work for the best sellers.” Continue reading “26” not set-in stone, OverDrive challenged on access fees