New (but not surprising) AAP findings this week: paperback, hardcover, and audio sales grow; ebook sales decline

AAPAAP has released some new numbers this week that point to the trend we saw in previous findings: that print (paperback and hardcover) and audio sales continue to grow while ebook sales continue to decline.

As always, when such reports are released, NSR zooms in on ebook numbers. They continue to go down (not up), as we can clearly see, but as we’ve noted previously on this issue, this may actually be a good thing. At least for those who advocate for more affordable access to books online, and especially for those whose advocate free access to books online (beyond libraries). Although disappointing, numbers like this do not confirm that people don’t want to read and access content in digital format. Instead, they confirm that they simply do not want to pay for ebooks, or at least not as much they’ve had to pay thusfar. Continue reading New (but not surprising) AAP findings this week: paperback, hardcover, and audio sales grow; ebook sales decline

Smashwords, where indie authors may price their books at ‘free,’ but ‘free’ isn’t the core mission

smashwordsThe focus of this week’s Free Content Alert column is ebook distributor Smashwords, which occupies a unique niche in the world of free ebook collections in that its focus is indie ebooks. As stated on Smashwords’ website:

Smashwords is the world’s largest distributor of indie ebooks.  We make it fast, free and easy for any author or publisher, anywhere in the world, to publish and distribute ebooks to the major retailers  and thousands of libraries. Continue reading Smashwords, where indie authors may price their books at ‘free,’ but ‘free’ isn’t the core mission

More ebook choices for OASIS users

OasisProQuest has just announced it has joined forces with De Gruyter to make De Gruyter’s 26,000 ebooks (from over 15 international imprints) available for purchase through the OASIS® system. This prompted us to revisit OASIS—ProQuest’s free web-based system for searching, selecting, and ordering print and electronic books for academic libraries—and provide a quick update on its growth.

Indended for academic, corporate, and government libraries, OASIS (Online Acquisitions and Selection Information System) supports multiple ordering and selection workflows for print and ebooks, including approval plans, firm orders, standing orders, demand driven acquisition, EDI ordering and MARC ordering. It now provides libraries with access to over 1.5 million unique ebook titles and 25 million print titles. Continue reading More ebook choices for OASIS users

NSR invites publishers and vendors to support EveryLibrary’s efforts to protect libraries

every library

EveryLibrary—a nonprofit social welfare organization chartered to work on local library ballot initiatives and the only national organization dedicated to political action at a local level to create and protect public funding for libraries—has just put out a statement to all who support its mission to fight for the future of libraries to join its efforts by pledging support.

As part of its efforts, EveryLibrary is working to roll-out a coalition strategy in 2017 that looks to expand, not shrink, library budgets, even in the current political climate. As part of its coalition strategy, EveryLibrary signed on to the One America Coalition to focus on a core part of libraries: services to immigrants and new Americans. In addition, EveryLibrary has been part of a coalition protecting Net Neutrality for over two years and next month it will announce an expansion of its voter registration and ballot access mission.

This is a good opportunity for publishers and vendors working with libraries—public, school, and academic—to consider making a donation to support EveryLibrary’s mission. Efforts like these should serve as a reminder to publishers and vendors that sell to libraries—and whose businesses thrive from their relationship with libraries—that libraries continue to face serious challenges with funding and their livelihood depends on the continued support from the public.

Individual contributions are always welcome and make a difference, but organizational contributions have the potential to make the deepest impact. Hence this post.

More information on EveryLibrary’s 2017 agenda is available here.

Book of the Week: Bedtime for Buzzy (T.J. Hackworth)

No Shelf Required is an ardent supporter of independent authors writing and producing their work on their own terms and with their own resources. In an effort to draw attention to quality independent (aka self-published) literature (fiction and nonfiction published by independent authors and indie publishers around the world), and in agreement with BlueInk Review, NSR highlights a wide variety of titles reviewed on BIR’s site each week. Enjoy this week’s (very timely) pick.

Bedtime for Buzzy

About Author

hackworth

 

T.J. Hackworth is a writer of short stories and children’s fiction. His work has also appeared recently in the Wisconsin Review. He lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife and daughter.

 

 


About BlueInk Review

BlueInk Review was founded by Patti Thorn, former books editor of the Rocky Mountain News, and Patricia Moosbrugger, literary agent and subsidiary rights specialist. It offers serious, unbiased reviews of self-published books. Reviews are penned largely by writers drawn from major mainstream publications, such as The New York Times and Washington Post, and editors of respected traditional publishing houses. Select reviews appear in Booklist magazine.

The flawed (and outdated) art of categorizing books and knowledge

books-401896During my years as a Library Journal book review editor, I spent countless hours each week sorting through books (then physical objects only) to figure out what goes where. When I started my editorial career (in the late 1990s), book categories made a lot more sense than they did when I left the book review job in 2010. I can’t count the times I went back and forth with my Library Journal colleagues about whether a newly arrived print galley belonged in my or someone else’s “pile,” to be assigned for review.

Is it Military History or Politics? But couldn’t it also be Law & Crime? Is it Literature because it’s literary or Self-help because it’s about a writer’s spiritual journey? Is it Philosophy or Religion? And what if it’s always at least three categories combined? Questions like these were part of our daily dialog. In retrospect, my colleagues and I made educated guesses every day when assigning books for review and I have no doubt that we didn’t always make the right ones. The way we printed book reviews in the magazine corresponded to the way books were categorized in libraries. Since we were the ones instructing librarians what to buy (by category), we were essentially driving the way books would be made available to patrons in libraries. Quite a responsibility. Continue reading The flawed (and outdated) art of categorizing books and knowledge

Program for DPLAfest 2017, to be held in Chicago April 20-21, now available

 DPLA 2017

DPLAfest 2017—the fourth major gathering of the Digital Public Library of America’s community—will take place on April 20-21, 2017 in Chicago at Chicago Public Library’s Harold Washington Library Center. The event will bring together librarians, archivists, and museum professionals, developers and technologists, publishers and authors, educators, and many others to celebrate DPLA and its community of creative professionals.

DPLA has just released the schedule, including a very extensive listing of the speakers.

From a DPLA press release:

We received an excellent array of submissions in response to this year’s call for proposals and are excited to officially unveil the dynamic program that we have lined up for you. Look for opportunities to engage with topics such as social justice and digital collections; public engagement; library technology and interoperability; metadata best practices; ebooks; and using digital collections in education and curation projects.

DPLAfest 2017 presenters represent institutions across the country—and as far as Europe—but also include folks from some of our host city’s premier cultural and educational institutions, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Field Museum and Chicago State University. We are also grateful for the support and collaboration of DPLAfest hosting partners  Chicago Public Library, the Black Metropolis Research ConsortiumChicago Collections, and the Reaching Across Illinois Library System (RAILS).

The Best of NSR: Why education continues to fail digital content and students

The Best of NSRIn her opinion piece for NSR, Why education continues to fail digital content and students, CEO of learning technology company Metrodigi, Kathryn Stewart, calls for a “much-needed disruption” in education, giving three reasons why it has been slow to leverage the benefits of digital content: inferior user experience, shortage of engaging content, and lack of commitment to overcome institutional barriers. Read full article here.


If you are a book, library or information professional interested in contributing to NSR, please contact the Editorial Director at mirelaroncevic@gmail.com. Please include a writing sample and a brief description of the topic you wish to explore. For more on NSR’s vision, visit our About and Mission pages. To browse our opinion pieces for inspiration, visit our Ideas page.

This week (in the history of) Literature and Arts

February 13, 2000: The last original Peanuts strip is published hours after creator Charles Schulz succumbs to colon cancer at 77.

Schulz’s contract with United Features prevented another artist from taking over Peanuts after his passing. Recycled strips continue to run in more than 2000 daily newspapers.

Seems impossible that it was 17 years ago.

CHarlie Brown Goodbye


Continue reading This week (in the history of) Literature and Arts

Free Trial Alert: Race Relations in America, a timely new resource concerning all

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Adam Matthew has just released a new—and very timely—online collection, Race Relations in America, culled from the extensive work of the Race Relations Department at Fisk University (Nashville), an influential think tank and center of scholarly investigation and public conversation on civil rights in the 20th century. Presenting speeches, reports, surveys and analyses, the resource sheds light on the Civil Rights Movement, segregation, discrimination and racial theory in America between 1943-1970.

NSR thanks Adam Matthew for giving us free access to share with our readers, valid for four weeks. If you are interested in exploring the resource (no strings attached) log in here. Then use the following:

  • Username: NSR2017
  • Password: amdRRIA7

The free trial ends on March 16, 2017. Please note that username and password are case sensitive. Please also note download options are not available during trials. Continue reading Free Trial Alert: Race Relations in America, a timely new resource concerning all

Portal on all aspects of ebooks and digital content and for all creating, reading, publishing, managing, curating, and distributing the written word and other content in digital format, including publishers, writers, editors, content developers, distributors, educators, librarians and information science professionals. Managed by Mirela Roncevic, with contributions from professionals and thought leaders in the United States and around the world.